Edward Preston Young DSO, DSC, RNVR

Born  17 Nov 1913
Died  28 Jan 2003(89)

Ranks

12 Apr 1940 T/S.Lt.
12 Apr 1941 T/Lt.
??? T/A/Lt.Cdr.

Retired: Nov 1945


Decorations

23 Mar 1943 DSC
12 Sep 1944 DSO
5 Jun 1945 Bar to DSC

Warship Commands listed for Edward Preston Young, RNVR


ShipRankTypeFromTo
HMS P 555 (P 555)T/Lt.Submarine23 Mar 194315 Jun 1943
HMS Storm (P 233)T/Lt.Submarine18 Jun 194323 Apr 1945

Career information


L-to-R: Bill Ray, Brian Mills, Edward Young, Richard Blake & Dicky Wade in the wardroom of H.M.S. Storm

Sources

Telegraph (2003). Commander Edward Young, obituary.

Events related to this officer

Submarine HMS Storm (P 233)


21 Aug 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) departed her builders yard at Birkenhead for Holy Loch. (1)

22 Aug 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) arrived at Holy Loch to begin a period of trials and training. (1)

5 Oct 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) departed Holy Loch for Scapa Flow. She made the passage with HMS Sea Rover (Lt. J.P. Angell, RN) (on passage to Lerwick). They were escorted by the armed yacht HMS White Bear (Cdr. (retired) A.L. Sanders, RN). (2)

8 Oct 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) arrived at Scapa Flow to participate in A/S exercises. (2)

9 Oct 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) conducted A/S exercises with HMS Milne (Capt. I.M.R. Campbell, DSO, RN), HMS Middleton (Lt. C.S. Battersby, RN), HMS Vigilant (Lt.Cdr. L.W.L. Argles, RN) and HMS Teazer (Lt.Cdr. A.A.F. Talbot, DSO and Bar, RN). (2)

11 Oct 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) conducted A/S exercises with HMS Vigilant (Lt.Cdr. L.W.L. Argles, RN) and HMCS Haida (Cdr. H.G. De Wolf, RCN). (2)

12 Oct 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) conducted A/S exercises with HMS Saumarez (Lt.Cdr. E.N. Walmsley, DSC, RN) and during the afternoon with HMS Loch Tulla (T/Skr. S.M. Norton, RNR). (2)

13 Oct 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) conducted A/S exercises with USS Corry (Lt.Cdr. L.B. Ensey, USN), HMS Brissenden (Lt. the Hon. D.D.E. Vivian, RN), HMS Hamlet (T/Lt. J.C. Boyd, RNVR) and HMS Celia (T/Lt. L.B. Merrick, RNR). (2)

14 Oct 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) conducted A/S exercises with HMS Saumarez (Lt.Cdr. E.N. Walmsley, DSC, RN), HMS Seagull (T/A/Lt.Cdr. R.W Ellis, DSC, RNR), HMS Middleton (Lt. C.S. Battersby, RN) and HMS Teazer (Lt.Cdr. A.A.F. Talbot, DSO and Bar, RN). (2)

15 Oct 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) conducted A/S exercises with HMS Musketeer (Cdr. R.L. Fisher, OBE, RN), HMS Mahratta (Lt.Cdr. E.A.F. Drought, DSC, RN), USS Corry (Lt.Cdr. L.B. Ensey, USN) and HMS Brissenden (Lt. the Hon. D.D.E. Vivian, RN). (2)

17 Oct 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) conducted A/S exercises with HMS Musketeer (Cdr. R.L. Fisher, OBE, RN), HMS Scorpion (Lt.Cdr. W.S. Clouston, RN) and HMS Ashanti (Lt.Cdr. J.R. Barnes, RN). (2)

18 Oct 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) conducted A/S exercises with HMS Urchin (Lt.Cdr. J.T.B. Birch, DSO, DSC, RN) and HMS Scorpion (Lt.Cdr. W.S. Clouston, RN).

Upon completion of the exercises Storm departed Scapa Flow for Holy Loch. She made the passage together with the British submarine HMS H 43 (Lt. C.A.J. Nicoll, RN) and the Dutch submarine HrMs K XV (Lt.Cdr. Baron C.W.T. van Boetzelaer, RNN). They were escorted by the British armed yacht HMS Cutty Sark (Cdr.(retired) R.H. Mack, RN). (2)

20 Oct 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) arrived at Holy Loch. (2)

22 Oct 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) was docked at Holy Loch. (2)

23 Oct 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) was undocked. (2)

11 Nov 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) departed Holy Loch for Lerwick. She made the passage together with HMS Sceptre (Lt. I.S. McIntosh, DSC, RN), HMS Sea Nymph (Lt. J.P.H. Oakley, DSC, RN) and HMS Thrasher (Lt. H.R.B. Newton, RN). They were escorted by the British minesweeper HMS La Capricieuse (Lt.Cdr.(retired) C.M. Norman, RN). (3)

14 Nov 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) arrived at Lerwick. After a few hours in port she departed for her 1st war patrol. She was ordered to patrol off Northern Norway.

For the daily positions of HMS Storm during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Storm 1st war patrol in a larger map (4)

27 Nov 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) ended her 1st war patrol at Lerwick. After only about half an hour in harbour she departed for Holy Loch escorted by HMS Sardonyx (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E. Playne, RNVR). Off Scapa Flow they were joined by HMS Thrasher (Lt. H.R.B. Newton, RN). (4)

29 Nov 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) arrived at Holy Loch. (3)

30 Nov 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) shifted from Holy Loch to Ardrossan where some modifications were to be fitted before her deployment to the Far East. (3)

20 Dec 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) shifted from Ardrossan to Holy Loch. (5)

27 Dec 1943
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) departed Holy Loch for passage to Gibraltar. This was the first leg of the trip to the Far East.

Passage towards Bishops Rock was made together with the British submarine HMS Viking (Lt. Rawdon Bannar-Martin, DSC, RN) and the Dutch submarine HrMs K XIV (Lt.Cdr. J.F. Drijfhout Van Hooff, RNN). They were escorted by the British armed yacht HMS Cutty Sark (Cdr.(retired) R.H. Mack, RN).

For the daily positions of HMS Storm during this passage see the map below.


View HMS Storm passage Holy Loch - Trincomalee in a larger map (5)

6 Jan 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) arrived at Gibraltar. (6)

9 Jan 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) departed Gibraltar for Beirut. She made part of the passage (to about Malta) in convoy KMS 37. (6)

10 Jan 1944
At 1832 hours, in position 36°03'N, 00°21'W, convoy KMS 37 came under air attack from German torpedo bombers flying at about only 50 feet and Storm opened fire with her Oerlikon and Vickers guns. No damage was done. (6)

20 Jan 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) arrived at Beirut. (6)

27 Jan 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) shifted from Beirut to Haifa. (6)

28 Jan 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) was docked at Haifa. (6)

29 Jan 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) was undocked at Haifa. She departed later the same day for Port Said. (6)

30 Jan 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) arrived at Port Said. (6)

31 Jan 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) transited the Suez Canal and arrived at Suez. (6)

1 Feb 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) departed Suez for Aden. (7)

7 Feb 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) arrived at Aden. (7)

10 Feb 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) departed Aden for Trincomalee. (7)

22 Feb 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) arrived at Trincomalee. (7)

24 Feb 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) departed Trincomalee for her 2nd war patrol (1st in the Far East). She was ordered to patrol in the Malacca Straits.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Storm during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Storm 2nd war patrol in a larger map (4)

28 Feb 1944
At 1557 hours (zone -6.5) HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) spotted a Japanese submarine in position 06°27'N, 93°55'E. She was however unable to attack.

The submarine in question was most likely the Japanese I-165 (offsite link) that had departed Penang for a patrol in the Indian Ocean the day before. (4)

7 Mar 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) made a torpedo attack on what turned out to be a Japanese A/S vessel. Four torpedoes were fired but no hits were obtained. Storm was hunted following the attack and two depth charges were dropped but these did no damage.

(All times are zone -6.5)
2318 hours - In position 02°57'N, 100°42'E sighted a darkened ship bearing 170°. Enemy course was 290°. At first this looked like a medium seized merchant ship at a range of 3 to 4 nautical miles. Closed on the surface to attack.

Light conditions were very difficult and it could still not be seen what the target was. At one point it was thought it might be a submarine.

2348 hours - Fired four torpedoes from 2000 yards at the still unidentified target. All torpedoes ran straight. The target however crossed the tracks unharmed. It was now seen that it was most likely a submarine chaser.

2350 hours - Dived and went to 150 feet. Furtunately there was a heavy density layer below 80 feet. The enemy meanwhile stopped several times to listen but no A/S transmissions were heard.

0003 hours (8th) - Two depth charges were dropped. No damage.

0015 hours (8th) - A second vessel now joined the hunt but no more depth charges were dropped. Storm meanwhile retired to the North-West.

0210 hours - No more HE could be heard.

0427 hours - Surfaced. Nothing in sight.

0455 hours - Sighted a blue flashing light on the port beam. Dived. No HE could be heard.

Early on the morning two ships that were searching the area were seen. T/Lt. Young decided not to attack and stay clear. (4)

12 Mar 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) sank a coaster with gunfire in the Malacca Strait.

(All times are zone -6.5)
1740 hours - In position 04°32'N, 99°31'E sighted a mast bearing 300°. It was soon seen to be a coaster of about 500 tons.

1742 hours - Dived to close submerged. However it soon became apparent that she could not be overtaken submerged.

1801 hours - Surfaced and closed at full speed to engage with gunfire.

1819 hours - Opened fire with the 3" gun from 3000 yards. The target soon stopped and did not put up a fight.

1835 hours - The target sank in position 04°34'N, 99°20'E. 55 Rounds had been fired in this action. (4)

18 Mar 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) ended her 2nd war patrol (1st in the Far East) at Trincomalee. (4)

29 Mar 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) was docked at Trincomalee. (8)

1 Apr 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) was undocked. (9)

3 Apr 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) conducted exercises off Trincomalee. (9)

6 Apr 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) departed Trincomalee for her 3rd war patrol (2nd in the Far East). She was ordered to patrol off Port Blair.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Storm during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Storm 3rd war patrol in a larger map (4)

13 Apr 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) made a torpedo attack on what is thought to be a small tanker. Four torpedoes were fired but no hits were obtained.

(All times are zone -6.5)
0328 hours - In position 11°24'N, 92°54'E sighted two vessels to the southward approaching Port Blair. Closed to identify. The target soon appeared to be a small coastal tanker 500-1500 tons escorted by a submarine chaser. Started attack.

0505 hours - Fired four torpedoes but as the enemy just reduced speed and now speed up again they most likely all missed astern. Storm went deep on firing. No counter attack followed although the area was patrolled during the whole day by a small A/S vessel. (4)

14 Apr 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) attacked a merchant vessel with six torpedoes off Port Blair. 2 possible hits were claimed but no Japanese ship was sunk in that position on this day.

(All times are zone -6.5)
0647 hours - In position 11°23'N, 92°49'E sighted smoke bearing 095°. Assumed this was a ship making for Port Blair.

0730 hours - The target was now seen to be a 3500 tons merchant ship with 3 escort vessels, one of which was a destroyer [actually this was the Japanese minesweeper W-7, see next day]. There were also two aircraft circling overhead. Started attack. Given the very strong escort for a ship of this size decided to fire a full salvo as she must be valuable to the enemy.

0852 hours - Fired 6 torpedoes from about 5000 yards. Went deep after firing and ran the the South-East. 3 Minutes and 20 seconds after firing there were two sharp explosions with a 5 second interval. Possibly they were torpedo hits also given the fact that the targets HE could no longer be heard after the explosions.

0901 hours - The counter attack began. Between now and 1050 hours, 21 depth charges were dropped. No damage was caused by them.

1110 hours - Periscope depth. Nothing in sight, remained down for the whole day. Reloaded the torpedo tubes in the meantime. (4)

15 Apr 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) torpedoed and sank the Japanese minesweeper W 7 (738 tons, built 1938, offsite link) off the Andaman Islands in position 11°34'N, 93°08'E.

(All times are zone -6.5)
0810 hours - In position 11°34'N, 92°57'E sighted a merchant ship bearing 350° steaming Eastward from Port Blair. She was escorted by the same escorts as the previous target. It was first thought that the merchant vessel was also the same but this one appears larger. There were however only two torpedoes left in the bow tubes and the stern torpedo. T/Lt. Young decided to fire the two bow tubes and keep the stern torpedo for a coup de grace if needed.

0837 hours - Fired two torpedoes from 4000 yards. After 3 minutes and 34 seconds two explosions were heard with 4 seconds between them. When the periscope was raised Lt. Young sighted the merchant vessel turning hard to Port just past the line of fire, half hidden by a veil of thin smoke. The destroyer [actually minesweeper] was on this side of the target and also just passed the line of fire. She had white smoke behind him. Black smoke and flames were seen pouring out of his stern were seen two minutes later. It seemed the escort had been hit. The merchant ship was seen to be making more smoke then before and steaming an erratic course. She soon almost stopped. Decided to attack her with the stern torpedo as she might also have been hit given her behaviour.

No counter attack followed by the other escorts. By now the target was seen to be 6000 yards away, zig-zagging wildly in all directions at a speed of 5 knots. A submarine chaser had meanwhile arrived at the scene and took of the destroyers [minesweepers] survivors and an aircraft had appeared on the scene.

0952 hours - The destroyer [minesweeper] emitted a huge sheet of flame and thick smoke from her stern and slowly sank. The submarine chaser returned to the harbour with the survivors. The merchant ship and the other two escorts meanwhile made off in a direction of 105°. Decided to follow submerged hoping that her speed would be only 5 knots and to overtake her to finish her off.

1224 hours - Surfaced and gave chase. Smoke was in sight bearing 103°. It however soon became evident that they were making about 10 knots, suggesting that the damage, if any, must be very small.

1430 hours - The masts of the target were now in sight.

1530 hours - The targets course was seen to be 135° now, making for Penang.

1830 hours - It was fairly dark now, closed to shadow her with the radar.

2134 hours - In position 10°28'N, 94°45'E obtained a radar echo bearing 360°, range 6400 yards. Shortly afterwards the target was sighted on that bearing. Started attack. Right now a second echo was obtained and one of the escorts began closing rapidly. It seemed Storm had been detected. Lt. Young dived and went deep expecting a hail of depth charges. The escort searched the area for 40 minutes but did not drop anything. The merchant in the meantine was gone now and the chase had to be abandoned.

0113 hours (16th) - Surfaced and proceeded towards Little Andaman Island. (4)

16 Apr 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) attacked a Japanese armed yacht off Little Andaman Island. The action had to be broken off due to problems with the shells for the 3" gun. Storm was depth charged by the enemy but sustained no damage.

(All times are zone -6.5)
1418 hours - When abeam of the Southern tip of the Cinque Islands (approximately 10°50'N, 92°48'E) a lookout sighted a vessel bearing 320°. Distance was about 8 nautical miles. It was thought to be a coaster coast crawling towards Port Blair. Increased speed and turned towards with the objective of attacking with the gun.

Shortly afterwards the target turned towards and as the range decreased she was seen to be a A/S vessel. She looked like a converted yacht with a small gun on the forecastle. Lt. Young decided to remain on the surface and attack with the gun as Storm's gun was far larger then the enemy's. When the range was about 5000 yards the enemy opened fire.

1432 hours - Range was now 4500 yards. Storm also opened fire. With the 6th shot the range was found and the enemy was not near Storm at all. After the 10th round however the ammunition supply suddenly vitually halted. During this delay the enemy however found the range and kept up a fast rate of fire. The shells came closer and closer and the action had to be broken off. The delay in the supply of shells was due to a problem with the fuse caps that were bolted on way to tight so that they could not be unscrewed.

1434 hours - Dived, went deep and proceeded at high speed in direction 110° for 5 minutes.

1445 hours - Six depth charges were dropped. They did no damage. Shortly afterwards the H.E. faded out astern and was not heard from then on.

1620 hours - Returned to periscope depth. Nothing in sight. Proceeded to the South.

1843 hours - Surfaced and set course for Trincomalee. (4)

19 Apr 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) ended her 3rd war patrol (2nd in the Far East) at Trincomalee. (4)

4 May 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) conducted exercises off Trincomalee. (10)

6 May 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) departed Trincomalee for her 4th war patrol (3rd in the Far East). She was ordered to patrol off the North coast of Sumatra and to conduct a special operation.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Storm during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Storm 4th war patrol in a larger map (4)

10 May 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) performed the first part of her special operation. An agent was landed on Pulau Weh during the evening. (4)

14 May 1944
In the evening HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) tried to pick up the agent landed a few days ago. He did not show up at the rendez-vouz. (4)

15 May 1944
At 0040 hours (zone -6.5) HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) spotted the correct signal on the shore about 3/4 mile to the East in the exact location of the village spotted earlier through the periscope. It was decided it was to risky to pick him up there. The next night another attempt would be undertaken. (4)

16 May 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) again tried to pick up the agent from Pulau Weh. However a trap for her was set by the Japanese. Storm managed too escape without serious damage and any injuries to her crew.

(All times are zone -6.5)
At 0030 hours the correct signal was sighted on the shore again, as yesterday half an hour late. Still not in the correct position but further to the West this time. Lt. Young decided to sent the boats in.

0055 hours - The leader of the party that was to pick up the agent 'smelt a rat' and was returning to HMS Storm.

0100 hours - The silence of the night was suddenly over when four machine guns and a 4" opened fire from the shore. A trap has been set for HMS Storm by the Japanese. The agent must have been captured by them and revealed the place and time of the rendez-vouz. The boats were still 400 yards away and made for Storm pulling like mad men. The 4" gun luckily did not find the range but Storm was hit several times by machine gun fire but none of the crew was injured.

0111 hours - Dived and proceeded away from the shore at full speed. When two miles out Lt. Young surfaced and made off at full surfaced speed as it was expected that A/S vessels would be patrolling the area. No ships were however sighted.

(4)

29 May 1944
HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) ended her 4th war patrol (3rd in the Far East) at Trincomalee. (4)

11 Jun 1944
During 11 and 12 June 1944 HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) conducted exercises off Trincomalee. These included night exercises. (11)

13 Jun 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) departed Trincomalee for her 5th war patrol (4th in the Far East). She was ordered to patrol in the Malacca Strait.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Storm during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Storm 5th war patrol in a larger map (4)

18 Jun 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) torpedoed and sank the Japanese auxiliary gunboat Eiko Maru (3011 GRT, built 1938) in the Strait of Malacca off Penang, Malaya in position 05°59'N, 99°10'E.

(All times are zone -6.5)
1615 hours - When in position 057° - Pulau Perak - 20 nautical miles, sighted smoke on the bearing of Pulau Perak.

1621 hours - Surfaced but immediately sighted an aircraft flying towards at a height of 1500 feet. Distance was about 5 nautical miles. Dived without being able to have a look at the target. Went deep for 10 minutes and then came to periscope depth again. The aircraft was not seen again and most likely it had not seen Storm. Set course to the North.

1700 hours - Sighted the funnel and two masts of a small merchant vessel about 12000 yards away. Shortly afterwards sighted the funnel and masts of a second merchant vessel some way astern of the other. Also two single masts were seen which turned out to be escort vessels. Started attack on the first merchant vessel, estimated to be of about 1500 tons.

1802 hours - Fired four torpedoes from 3000 yards and went deep immediately afterwards. After 1 minute and 50 seconds there was a loud explosion followed by two others at interval of 7 and 4 seconds. These last ones sounded different but the first explosion was defenately a hit on the ship. The targets HE ceased.

1811 hours - Three depth charges were dropped but not close.

1814 hours - Four depth charges were dropped, a bit closer. No damage was caused.

1845 hours - No HE could be heard anymore. Returned to periscope depth. Sighted an escort vessel on the Port quarter about one mile away. Went deep again. Soon afterwards HE was heard on that bearing and was closing fast. An attack was expected but luckily it did not materialise.

1920 hours - Heard distant HE on the Port quarter. This was the last that was heard of the enemy.

1959 hours - Surfaced. Retired at speed from the area. (4)

20 Jun 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) attacked German U-boat U-1062 with torpedoes in the Malacca Strait. The torpedoes however miss their target. The U-boat had left Penang the previous day.

(All times are zone -6.5)
0905 hours - In position 06°41'N, 96°27'E sighted smoke bearing 100°. Dived. Shortly afterwards sighted the conning tower of a submarine. She continued to produce a surprising amount of grey smoke. Started attack.

0940 hours - Fired six torpedoes from 2500 yards. Enemy course was 270°, speed 14 knots. During firing depth control was lost and when Storm returned to periscope depth 3 minutes later it was seen that the enemy had turned away. Possibly they had sighted the torpedo tracks. 8 Minutes after firing four torpedoes were heard to explode at the end of their run. (4)

25 Jun 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) ended her 5th war patrol (4th in the Far East) at Trincomalee. (4)

15 Jul 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) departed Trincomalee for her 6th war patrol (5th in the Far East). She was ordered to patrol off the West coast of Burma.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Storm during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Storm 6th war patrol in a larger map (4)

23 Jul 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) sank the Japanese coaster Kiso Maru (554 GRT, built 1939) just North off Port Owen, Tavoy Island, Burma in approximimate position 13°12'N, 98°16'E.

Shortly afterwards Storm entered the Port Owen anchorage and sank two small patrol vessels there.

A gun action off King Island had to be broken off due to a defects to the 3" gun and Oerlikon.

(All times are zone -6.5)
Decided to make a closer inspection of Port Owen, Tavoy Island, Burma.

0915 hours - After rounding the North-East corner of Tavoy Island sighted a coaster coming towards, steaming up the East coast of Tavoy Island.

0940 hours - Surfaced 800 yards on the coasters Port quarter. Engaged with the 3" gun.

0945 hours - The target stopped. Ceased fire after 28 rounds, all of which hit. Closed as the target was now sinking. The crew was seen to abandon ship. Two prisoners were picked up, one Japanese and one Malay.

1000 hours - As it was raining and the visibility was less then 3 miles decided to enter Port Owen. It was now unlikely that the recent action had been observed from the anchorage.

1035 hours - Sighted three vessels in the harbour. One was the hulk of a junk but the other two were small patrol vessels anchored close inshore.

1050 hours - Opened fire on one of the patrol vessels from 1200 yards. This patrol vesel had succeded in weighing anchor and was just underway. She stopped after the third round that was the first hit. The Japanese in the meantime had opened fire with machine guns. As soon as the crew of the first patrol vessel abandoned ship fire was shifted to the second patrol vessel. Soon this vessel was also abandoned. Both vessels were then finished off and Storm departed the anchorage through the South-Eastern entrance. During the action one of the gun crew was wounded in the shoulder by a machine gun bullet. Course was then set towards King Island Sound.

---------------------------------------

1636 hours - Sighted two landing craft proceeding down river from Mergui. One was seen to be armed with two machine guns the other one with one marchine gun.

1700 hours - Surfaced for gun action. Range was about 1800 yards. After two near-misses this vessel turned away. The other one (with the two machine guns) turned toward and opened fire. It was intended to shift fire to this landing craft when the 3" gun malfunctioned. Fire was then to be opened with the Oerlikon but this gun also malfunctioned.

1704 hours - Dived and proceeded Northwards at speed. Shortly afterwards a depth charge was dropped followed 5 minutes later by another one quite close. Several lights were put out. Course was now set to escape through Iron Passage.

1830 hours - Surfaced when clear of Ant Island. (4)

1 Aug 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) sank 3 coasters and a sailing vessel with gunfire of the Mergui Archipelago, Burma.

(All times are zone -6.5)
0442 hours - The forward lookout sighted a small light to the seaward and then the shape of a coaster. The coaster was Southbound and of about 350 tons.

0446 hours - Opened fire with the 3" gun and Oerlikon. After 50 rounds the target sank in position 13°37'N, 98°05'E.

Just after turning away from the scene another ship was sighted on the horizon to the Northward in the gradually increasing light. Dived and closed at speed. This soon turned out to be a small two-masted schooner of 100 tons. She was Southbound.

0626 hours - Surfaced and fired one round, hoping she would stop and that the crew would abandon ship. However she increased speed and ran for the shore. Storm closed to head her off, and in the meantime continued firing. The schooner was soon a shambles. A good burst of Oerlikon set her well on fire. After 36 round of 3" T/A/Lt.Cdr. Young gave up the attempt to sink her. It was seen she was well ablaze also below decks it was decided to leave her as she was clearly a total loss even if she would not sink. She was last seen laying stopped in position 13°38'N, 98°06'E. Two survivors were picked up, one Indian and one Malay. It was learnt from them that the ship was called the Kikaku Maru. Storm then proceded Northward to get away from the scene of the attacks.

------------------------------------------

1100 hours - Sighted a 250 tons coaster Southbound bearing 285°. Closed.

1125 hours - Surfaced 800 yards astern of the target for gun action. The enemy opened fire and turned towards in an attempt to ram. He however soon changed his mind after being hit several times by Storm's gunfire. The crew then jumped overboard, many were seen to be Japanese. The vessel soon sank to deck level at the stern but she refused to sink any further. 38 Rounds of 3" had been fired. As a lookout now reported another vessel to the Southward the action was broken off as the target was clearly a total loss.

1200 hours - Dived and proceeded towards this new target.

1210 hours - The target that Storm had just left was seen to sink in position 13°48'N, 98°01'E. The new target was seen to be a brand new coaster of about 300 tons. She was Northbound.

1255 hours - Surfaced about 800 yards astern of the target and opened fire with the 3" gun. The second round was a hit and made a shambles of the bridge. Several figures were seen to run forward and it was thought that there might be a machine gun there. They never stood a chance as the third round hit forward of the bridge and started a fire. The crew, some of them Japanese, then abandoned ship. A total of 12 rounds were fired by which time the ship was a mass of flames.

1400 hours - The target sank in position 13°47'N, 98°01'E. Storm then proceeded Southwards. (4)

7 Aug 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) ended her 6th war patrol (5th in the Far East) at Trincomalee. (4)

21 Aug 1944
During 21 and 22 August 1944 HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) conducted exercises off Trincomalee. These included night exercises.

HMS Storm and HMS Telemachus (Cdr. W.D.A. King, DSO, DSC, RN) made practice attack on each other.

She also took part in an A/S exercise with HMS Pathfinder (Lt.Cdr. T.F. Hallifax, RN) and HMAS Norman (Cdr. H.J. Buchanan DSO, RAN). (12)

25 Aug 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) departed Trincomalee for her 7th war patrol (6th in the Far East). She was ordered to patrol off the Mergui Archipelago and to proceed towards Fremantle, Australia afterwards.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Storm during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Storm 7th war patrol in a larger map (4)

1 Sep 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) attacked a convoy of 5 coasters and 2 escorts with 5 torpedoes in the Forrest Strait, Mergui Archipelago. No hits were obtained.

(All times are zone -6.5)
1035 hours - Sighted several columns of smoke to the Southward. Closed at speed while dived.

1050 hours - Surfaced for a quick look and sighted 9 small vessels, 7 coasters and 2 escorts. These escorts were either landing craft or small motor launches. They were proceeding up Forrest Strait, passing to the Eastward of High Island. Dived immediately and ran in to attack.

1136 hours - In position 11°08'N, 98°21'E. fired 5 torpedoes at this convoy. Depth setting was 4 feet. Range was 600 yards to the nearest target. The tracks were sighted and made temporary individual alterations of course. Following this attack the escorts made a search for the attacking submarine but the did not locate Storm and no depth charges were dropped until 1218 when two were dropped by the escorts as a farewell gesture.

Storm surfaced during the afternoon in heavy rain to take up a position to get ahead of the convoy but nothing further was seen of it.

(4)

2 Sep 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR) sank a Japanese coaster and two escorts with gunfire off Mergui. They were part of the convoy that was attacked unsuccesfully with torpedoes the previous day. Also an MTB, an MGB and two coasters were damaged by gunfire.

(All times are zone -6.5)
0924 hours - Sighted the same convoy as was attacked yesterday approaching from Morrison Bay on an approximate course of 350°. T/A/Lt.Cdr. Young decided to let them all pass and then attack with gunfire hoping to minimise the chances of a massed ramming attack.

1117 hours - Surfaced in position 12°07'N, 98°14'E and opened fire on the rear coaster from 2000 yards. 7 or 8 Fairly destructive hits were obtained. She turned away and limped towards the shore. Fire was then shifted to the coaster ahead of her. She was hit several times and eventually stopped. By now both escorts came racing towards firing their machine guns. Fire was now opened on both of them with the 3" gun, Oerlikon and Vickers. One of the escorts was sunk and the other one was left a wreck but refused to sink. In the meantime a small vessel was seen coming towards at high speed and it was soon seen to be a Motor Torpedo Boat. It was now engaged and at a range of 3000 yards she turned and fired two torpedoes. The tracks passed about 100 yards astern of Storm. When she was retiring a direct hit was scored on the MTB. Another vessel meanwhile had opened up fore on Storm, this was seen to be a Motor Gun Boat laying stopped about 4000 yards away. Storm was hit on the bridge casing but no one was injured. The coaster had had been stopped earlier was now finished off as was the escort that did not sink when first attacked. The coaster that was first attacked was thought to have beached itself but was later seen to make off with the remainer though heavily damaged.

Fire was then directed at a coaster laying stopped about 4000 yards away. Two direct hits were obtained and his bridge was demolished. Now the 3" gun malfunctioned and all Oerlikon and Vickers ammo had been used.

1153 hours - The action was now broken off and Storm retired to the West. (4)

6 Sep 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) sank a small junk by ramming in position 10°31'N, 98°24'E.

(All times are zone -6.5)
0630 hours - Sighted a small junk in position 10°31'N, 98°24'E. The junk was Northbound. Closed.

0639 hours - Surfaced and fired one round ahead as warning hoping that the crew would abandon ship but they all disappeared from sight. After a pause of two minutes three rounds were fired at her bows. One of these unfortunately killed one of the crew. The junk settled low in the water but refused to sink any further. She was sunk by ramming. Four survivors were picked up but a fifth unfortunately drowned. At 1645 hours the four survivors were put on a small fishing vessel. (4)

14 Sep 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) reconnoitred Christmas Island. No shipping was seen inside the harbour. (4)

18 Sep 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) made a short stop at Exmouth Gulf, Australia for fuel. After nearly four hours she departed for Fremantle. (4)

22 Sep 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) ended her 7th war patrol (6th in the Far East) at Fremantle, Australia. (4)

7 Oct 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) conducted exercises off Fremantle. The included several practice attacks on the Australian minesweeper HMAS Dubbo (T/Lt. F.W. Roberts, RANR(S)). (13)

10 Oct 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) departed Fremantle, Australia for her 8th war patrol (7th in the Far East and 1st in the South-West Pacific area). She was ordered to patrol off the Gulf of Boni, Celebes, Netherlands East Indies.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Storm during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Storm 8th war patrol in a larger map (4)

13 Oct 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) made a short call at Exmouth Gulf for additional fuel before proceeding towards her patrol area. (4)

18 Oct 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) passed Umbai Strait Northbound. (4)

20 Oct 1944
At 1455 hours (time zone -8), shortly after arriving in her patrol area, HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) was bombed by a Japanese aircraft while at periscope depth in position 05°41'S, 120°31'E. Some minor damage to Storm was caused by this bombing. Storm then withdrew to seaward as the area T/A/Lt.Cdr. Young intented to operate in was now compromised. (4)

29 Oct 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) sank two schooners with gunfire and demolition charges in the Gulf of Boni, Celebes, Netherlands East Indies.

(All times are zone -8)
0332 hours - Sighted a darkened vessel fairly close. This was later seen to be a schooner.

0416 hours - Dived in position 04°16'S, 121°07'E.

0500 hours - Sighted 2 more sails to the Westward which were soon seen to be a schooner and a cutter. Closed to attack.

0540 hours - Surfaced near the nearest schooner. The crew were sent away in their canoe. The hold was empty but there was residue of stone ore.

0615 hours - Sank the schooner with gunfire, named Maselomo, in position 04°15'S, 121°10'E. Proceeded towards the second schooner.

0650 hours - The crew had already lowered her sail and abandoned ship before Storm reached her. She was then boarded. Her name was Boenga Padi. The papers showed she was to load nickel ore on her return journey to Makassar. She was sunk with a demolition charge in position 04°10'S, 121°09'E.

0720 hours - In the meantime the small cutter, one mile away, had also been abandoned. The crew had left with their canoe. On board there was only a small cargo of rice and a few bricks. The crews of both schooners and the cutter were now collected and placed on the cutter with orders to sail to the West which they did. (4)

1 Nov 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) sank two schooners with gunfire and demolition charges in the Gulf of Boni, Celebes, Netherlands East Indies.

(All times are zone -8)
0100 hours - Sighted a Westbound schooner in position 04°56'S, 120°59'E. Closed and boarded. The schooners hold was full with nickel ore. The crew of 11 Malays was taken on board and the schooner named Goenong Perak was sunk with gunfire. Storm the resumed her course to the Northward.

----------------------------------------

0930 hours - Sighted a schooner bearing 072° sailing to the South-West. Closed. A warning shot had to be fired across her bows before she lowered sail.

1000 hours - Boarded. She too was full of nickel ore. The malay crew was sent away in their canoe. Her name was Sabarae.

1031 hours - The schooner was sunk with a demolition charge in position 04°16'S, 121°06'E. (4)

2 Nov 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) sank seven schooners gunfire off the Gulf of Boni, Celebes, Netherlands East Indies.

(All times are zone -8)
0540 hours - Sighted three Westbound schooners bearing 130°.

0559 hours - Dived in position 04°25'S, 120°56'E for an aircraft (detected by radar). The aircraft was not sighted.

0616 hours - Surfaced and chased the schooners.

0637 hours - Dived in position 04°33'S, 120°59'E for an aircraft (detected by radar). One again the aircraft was not sighted.

0646 hours - Surfaced and resumed the chase.

0700 hours - Fired a warning shot. All three schooners dropped sail. Boarded each in turn. They all carried nickel ore. One of them was named Moelam Pekkee, the other two were un-named. The crews were taken off and sent below. This meant that there were 18 Malays in the submarine. Four more schooners had meanwhile been sighted on the horizon to the South-West. A fishing vessel was sighted to the Northward. As there was not much wind and the schooners would not be able to sail at a high speed T/A/Lt.Cdr. Young decided to get rid of the Malays first.

0745 hours - Left the abandoned schooners and proceeded five miles to the North towards the fishing vessel.

0828 hours - Disembarked the Malays and returned to the three schooners.

0901 hours - Sank the three schooners in turn with gunfire in position 04°38'S, 121°03'E.

0930 hours - Proceeded towards three of the four schooners sighted earlier. The 4th was some distance to the windward of the others. It was decided to sink the three and then disembark the crews in the fourth.

1005 hours - Came up with the schooners. All were fully laden with nickel ore. Boarded each in turn and took off the crews. Sank them in turn with gunfire in position 05°50'S, 120°52'E. There were now 38 Malays on board Storm. One of the schooners was named Tjenning Atie, the other two were not named.

1202 hours - Came up with the fourth schooner which correctly lowered sail. Cargo was again nickel ore. Had them jettison their cargo and disembarked the 38 Malays.

1219 hours - Began circling the schooner to make sure they carried out their orders.

1300 hours - Gave the schooner permission to proceed. Storm proceeded Northwards.

--------------------------------------

1700 hours - Sighted a schooner bearing 060°, bound South-West.

1745 hours - This schooner was a modern, heavier and beamier type than the others seen during this patrol. She continued to sail on when she was approached by HMS Storm. Fired two warning shots of which no notice was taken except by two of the crew that jumped overboard. Fired a shot at his mainmast, high up, it was a hit but produced no result. Fired two shots through his mainsail but they did not explode. Finally came alongside in position 04°23'S, 121°02'E. Eventually they did lower sail now. Took the crew onboard Storm and proceeded to another small sailing vessel to put them aboard.

2127 hours - Returned to the abandoned schooner and attempted to sink her with gunfire after an attempt to set her on fire had failed. After sinking the hull bopped up again on its side and in spite of ramming refused to sink any further. Her name was Tahaja Azia (4)

5 Nov 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) passed through Lombok Strait Southbound. (4)

9 Nov 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) made a call at Exmouth Gulf for additional fuel before proceeding towards Fremantle. (4)

13 Nov 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) ended her 8th war patrol (7th in the Far East and 1st in the South-West Pacific area) at Fremantle, Australia. (4)

24 Nov 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) was docked at Fremantle. (14)

26 Nov 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) was undocked. (14)

1 Dec 1944
During 1 and 2 December 1944 HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) conducted exercises off Fremantle. These included night exercises.

4 Dec 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) departed Fremantle, Australia for her 9th war patrol (8th in the Far East and 2nd in the South-West Pacific area). She was ordered to patrol in Makassar Strait.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Storm during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Storm 9th war patrol in a larger map (4)

12 Dec 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) arrived at Darwin for fuel, water and fresh meat. After about 6 hours in port she departed for her patrol area. (4)

18 Dec 1944
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) made a torpedo attack on an escorted merchant vessel in the Macassar Strait. No hits were obtained.

(All times are zone -8)
1752 hours - In position 00°34'N, 118°35'E sighted masts and funnel of a small merchant ship bearing 090° and also smoke of another vessel astern. Altered course and closed. Soon it was seen to be a convoy of a merchant vessel of about 1000 tons escorted by three smaller vessels.

1842 hours - Fired three torpedoes from about 4000 yards. No hits were obtained. No counter attack followed. (4)

2 Jan 1945
During the night of 2 / 3 January 1945 HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) passed Lombok Strait Southbound. (4)

10 Jan 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) ended her 9th war patrol (8th in the Far East and 2nd in the South-West Pacific area) at Fremantle, Australia. (4)

23 Jan 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) was put on the slipway at Fremantle, Australia. (15)

24 Jan 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) was put back in the water. (15)

31 Jan 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) departed Fremantle for her 10th war patrol (9th in the Far East). She was ordered to patrol off the West coast of Sumatra and to proceed to Trincomalee upon completion of the patrol.

Storm was due to return to the U.K. for a refit.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Storm during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Storm 10th war patrol in a larger map (4)

4 Feb 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) made a short stop at Onslow, Australia for fuel. She departed for her patrol area after a little over 5 hours in port. (4)

20 Feb 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) ended her 10th war patrol (9th in the Far East) at Trincomalee. (4)

24 Feb 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) departed Trincomalee for the U.K., the first leg of the trip was to Aden.

For the daily positions of HMS Storm during the passage back to the U.K. see the map below.


View HMS Storm passage Trincomalee - Portsmouth in a larger map (16)

7 Mar 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) arrived at Aden. After a few hours in port she departed for Suez. (17)

12 Mar 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) arrived at Suez. (17)

14 Mar 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) transited the Suez Canal and arrived at Port Said. Later the same day she departed Port Said for Alexandria. (17)

15 Mar 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) arrived at Alexandria. (17)

17 Mar 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) was docked at Alexandria. (17)

20 Mar 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) was undocked. (17)

22 Mar 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) departed Alexandria for Malta. (17)

26 Mar 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) arrived at Malta. (17)

27 Mar 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) departed Malta for Gibraltar. (17)

31 Mar 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) arrived at Gibraltar. After a few hours in port she departed for Falmouth. She made part of the passage in convoy MKS-92. (17)

6 Apr 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) arrived at Falmouth. (18)

7 Apr 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) departed Falmouth for Portsmouth. She was escorted by HMS Dochet (T/Lt. G.C. Wood, RNVR). (18)

8 Apr 1945
HMS Storm (T/A/Lt.Cdr. E.P. Young, DSO, DSC, RNVR) arrived at Portsmouth. (18)

Media links


One of our Submarines

Young, Edward

Sources

  1. ADM 173/18121
  2. ADM 173/18123
  3. ADM 173/18124
  4. ADM 199/1870
  5. ADM 173/18125
  6. ADM 173/18829
  7. ADM 173/18830
  8. ADM 173/18831
  9. ADM 173/18832
  10. ADM 173/18833
  11. ADM 173/18834
  12. ADM 173/18835
  13. ADM 173/18837
  14. ADM 173/18838
  15. ADM 173/19738
  16. ADM 173/19739
  17. ADM 173/19740
  18. ADM 173/19741

ADM numbers indicate documents at the British National Archives at Kew, London.


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