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The U-Boats that Surrendered. U-1407 (HMS Meteorite) in the Royal Navy - 1945 to 1949

by Derek Waller - 31 Oct 2011
The Potsdam Agreement signed on 2 August 1945 included the decision to allocate just 10 U-Boats to each of the three Allies for technical assessment and experimental purposes. This led to the creation of the Tripartite Naval Commission (TNC) which was charged with determining the list of U-Boats to be allocated to each country. Thus, they recommended which U-Boats should be retained by the UK, one of which was the Type XVIIB U-Boat, U-1407, which was powered by a Walter gas turbine using high-test peroxide (HTP) as its fuel.

The U-Boats that Surrendered - The U-Boats Allocated to the UK in 1945 (Version 2)

by Derek Waller - 9 Oct 2011
The 1945 post-war Potsdam Agreement signed on 2 August 1945, which included the requirement to allocate 10 U-Boats to each of the three Allies (USA, UK and USSR), led to the creation of the Tripartite Naval Commission (TNC), which was charged with determining exactly which U-Boats would be allocated to each country. Thus, representatives of the TNC visited the UK in August and September 1945 to inspect all the surrendered U-Boats held in the UK, mainly at Lisahally and in Loch Ryan. As a result, they decided which U-Boats should be recommended to the Commission for formal allocation and therefore transfer to each of the three Allies.

The U-Boats that Surrendered - U-Boats at Lisahally in Lough Foyle, near Londonderry, N. Ireland 1945 to 1949

by Derek Waller - 4 Sep 2011
In May 1945 the Royal Naval port at Lisahally, in Lough Foyle near Londonderry in Northern Ireland became a centre of activity for the receipt, processing and ultimate disposal of many of the German U-Boats that had surrendered elsewhere in Europe at the end of the war.

The U-Boats that Surrendered - U-Boats in the Royal Navy post-May 1945

by Derek Waller - 16 Aug 2011
after the end of WW2, a number of U-Boats saw some degree of service with the Royal Navy, which also had an early opportunity to inspect and conduct trials with several U-Boats in addition to the 10 which were to be allocated to the UK.

Reassessing the losses of U 85 and UC 68

by Michael Lowrey - 16 Apr 2011
In March 1917 two German U-boats, the large U 85 (Kplt. Petz) and the smaller UC 68 (Oblt. Dagetau) disappeared. This article is a reassessment on their fates.

The Fate of the U-Boats which Surrendered - Sink or Scrap?

by Derek Waller - 13 Mar 2011
The discussions among Allied Powers as to what to do with the surrendered German U-boats at end of the war.

The U-Boats that Survived - The Whole Story

by Derek Waller - 10 Jan 2011
A total of 156 U-Boats surrendered to the Allies at the end of the war in Europe in May 1945. Of these, 155 were German-built U-Boats and one was a Dutch submarine used by the Germans (UD-5). When the war with Japan ended in August 1945, seven of the Imperial Japanese Navy’s submarines which surrendered were either ex-German-built or German-commissioned U-Boats. Also, two U-Boats were captured during the war: U-505 by the US Navy and U-570 by the Royal Navy.

The U-Boats that Surrendered - The U-Boats Allocated to the UK in 1945

by Derek Waller - 13 Dec 2010
The 1945 post-war Potsdam Agreement, which included the requirement to allocate 10 U-Boats to each of the 3 Allies (USA, UK and USSR), led to the creation of the Tripartite Naval Commission (TNC), which was charged with determining exactly which U-Boats would be allocated to each country. Thus, representatives of the TNC visited the UK in August and September 1945 to inspect all the surrendered U-Boats held at Lisahally and in Loch Ryan. As a result, they decided which U-Boats should be recommended to the Commission for formal allocation and therefore transfer to each of the three Allies.

The Potsdam Agreement and the Tripartite Naval Commission

by Derek Waller - 29 Nov 2010
The Potsdam Agreement and the decisions of the associated Tripartite Naval Commission (TNC) are critical elements in the story of the disposal and destruction of the Kriegsmarine after the end of the war in Europe, as they formed the basis of the actions that led to the ultimate fate of all the U-Boats that survived the war and surrendered at the end of it.

Fact or Fiction - Did U-1197 Surrender in 1945?

by Derek Waller - 18 Nov 2010
Ever since the end of the war in Europe in 1945 there has been uncertainty surrounding the U-Boats that surrendered. Much of it relates to the surrender dates and locations, but some even relates to the question of whether or not a particular U-Boat surrendered in the first place. U-1197 is an example of the latter, and the purpose of this note is to illustrate how uncertainties can still be portrayed as fact even 65 years after the events took place.