Ships hit by U-boats


Dixie Arrow

American Steam tanker



NameDixie Arrow
Type:Steam tanker
Tonnage8,046 tons
Completed1921 - New York Shipbuilding Corp, Camden NJ 
OwnerSocony-Vacuum Oil Co Inc, New York 
HomeportNew York 
Date of attack26 Mar 1942Nationality:      American
 
FateSunk by U-71 (Walter Flachsenberg)
Position34.55N, 75.02W - Grid CA 7995
Complement33 (11 dead and 22 survivors).
Convoy
RouteTexas City, Texas - Paulsboro, New Jersey 
Cargo86.136 barrels of crude oil 
History Completed in November 1921 
Notes on event

At 14.59 hours on 26 Mar, 1942, the unescorted and unarmed Dixie Arrow (Master Anders M. Johanson, lost) was hit on the starboard side by two torpedoes from U-71 about 12 miles off the Diamond Shoals Light Buoy, when she was proceeding on a zigzag pattern with 45° tacks at 11 knots. The first hit amidships and destroyed the deckhouse, killing all deck officers, the radio operator and several other men. The second struck between the mast and the smokestack and broke the ship in two. The engine room was not damaged, but the forepart became enveloped in flames almost at once. The engines were stopped and the tanker was turned into the wind, to allow eight men on the forecastle to jump overboard. The helmsman Able Seaman Oscar G. Chappell stayed at his post until these men escaped, but died when the flames were blew back toward the bridge. The helmsman won the Merchant Marine Distinguished Service Medal. Two boats were destroyed by fire and a third boat swamped. The last boat got away with eight men. These men and 14 others in the water were picked up by USS Tarbell (DD 142) and taken to Morehead City, North Carolina. Four officers and seven men of eight officers and 25 men died in the attack. The Dixie Arrow sank about two hours later and her wreck lies in 34°53´30N/75°44´42W.

 
On boardWe have details of 11 people who were on board

Location of attack on Dixie Arrow.

ship sunk.


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