Ships hit by U-boats


Fjordheim

Norwegian Steam merchant


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NameFjordheim
Type:Steam merchant
Tonnage4,115 tons
Completed1930 - Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson Ltd, Wallsend, Sunderland 
OwnerNiels Røgenæs, Haugesund 
HomeportHaugesund 
Date of attack3 Sep 1944Nationality:      Norwegian
 
FateSunk by U-482 (Hartmut Graf von Matuschka, Freiherr von Toppolczan und Spaetgen)
Position55.55N, 09.28W - Grid AM 5282
Complement38 (3 dead and 35 survivors).
ConvoyONF-251
RouteSwansea - Belfast - Loch Ewe - Halifax 
Cargo4000 tons of anthracite coal 
History Completed October 1930

British aircraft were stationed on Iceland since April 1941. A month later, the Fjordheim transported 18 Northrop aircraft, spare parts, ammunition and depth charges from Canada to Reykjavik for the 330 (Norwegian) Squadron RAF stationed there. 
Notes on event

At 00.10 hours on 3 Sep, 1944, the Fjordheim (Master Arthur Jensen) in convoy ONF-251 was hit by one torpedo from U-482. The explosion killed three men on watch below, blew off the hatches of the holds and a huge wave of water and coal sweeped over the deck. Six minutes later, after the crew had abandoned ship, the boilers exploded and she sank immediately. 32 crew members abandoned ship in four lifeboats and three men jumped overboard. One was picked up by the boats, while two others were found by a boat from the British steam merchant Empire Mallory, which had lowered the boat to help in the search. The survivors in the lifeboats were picked up by HMCS Montreal (K 319) (T/LtCdr S.W. Howell, RCNR) and transferred to the British rescue ship Fastnet on 7 September. The two survivors picked up by the Empire Mallory were transferred to the rescue ship on 13 September, which landed all men at Halifax on 17 September.

 
On boardWe have details of 38 people who were on board

Location of attack on Fjordheim.

ship sunk.


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