Italian submarines in World War Two


Neghelli (NG)
Neghelli

TypeCoastal / Sea going 
ClassAdua (23) 
Laid down 25 Feb 1937 Odero-Terni-Orlando, Muggiano
Launched7 Nov 1937
Commissioned28 Feb 1938
End service
Stricken
Loss date19 Jan 1941
Loss position37° 15'N, 24° 04'E
History
Fate Possibly sunk on 19th January 1941 in the Aegean in position 37°15'N, 24°04'E by depth charges from the destroyer HMS Greyhound. However, the results of the attack were inconclusive and there is no absolute certainty of her fate.

Commands

CommanderDate fromDate toCommand
C.C. Carlo Ferracuti28 Aug 193819 Jan 1941

Patrols and events

 CommanderDateTimePortArr. dateArr. timeArr. portMilesDescription
1Ferracuti, Carlo9 Jun 19400705La Spezia21 Jun 19400845La Spezia759Patrolled south of Cape Antibes. Area of patrol between 42°54'N, and between 43°24'N and 07°00'E and 07°40'E.
  13 Jun 1940034043° 10'N, 7° 20'EAt 0240 hours, a 6,000-ton steamer was sighted proceeding with lights according to regulations. Neghelli closed to investigate but as the flag could not be made out and she was steering 240° toward Marseilles (or Toulon), an attack was prepared.

At 0340 hours, a single torpedo was fired from a bow tube (450mm, W.200 type) at a range of 1,800 metres. It missed as her speed was apparently 2-3 knots slower than initially estimated. C.C. Carlo Ferracuti decided not to pursue the action with the gun in order not to reveal his position. He was hoping to have more worthwhile targets.
  13 Jun 19401445
1340 GMT (e)
43° 10'N, 7° 20'E
(0) Approximately.
At 1445 hours, Neghelli was on a listening watch at a depth of 27 metres, when she was suddenly depth charged. She had not detected her aggressors.

These were the French destroyers La Bayonnaise and Baliste escorting the 15th Submarine Division (or 15e DSM: Vénus, Pallas, Iris and Archimède to take positions for the Vado operation. Both attacked the submarine with depth-charges.

Ferracuti, Carlo26 Jun 19402200La Spezia27 Jun 19402040La Maddalena213Passage La Spezia-La Maddalena with Argo and Scirè.

2Ferracuti, Carlo3 Jul 19401410La Maddalena7 Jul 19400755La Maddalena723Patrolled within 5 miles from 37°12'N, 07°30'E on a 290°-110° axis, on a patrol line with Scirè and Diaspro off Algerian coast.
  6 Jul 19402200
(0) Off Sardinia.
At 2200 hours, the Italian steamer Derna (1,769 GRT, built 1912) was sighted at a distance of 2,500 metres, on a southerly course toward Cagliari.

Neghelli was not aware of the presence of Derna, fortunately the vessel promptly identified herself and the attack was aborted.

Ferracuti, Carlo22 Jul 19401340La Maddalena22 Jul 19401945La Maddalena32Exercises.

3Ferracuti, Carlo31 Jul 19402225La Maddalena1 Aug 19401523CagliariSailed with Scirè and Argo and brief stop at Cagliari to pick up her sailing orders before proceeding for patrol.

3bFerracuti, Carlo1 Aug 19401546Cagliari11 Aug 19401100La Maddalena1369Patrolled south of the Balearic Islands on a line from 38°20'N 6°20'E to 06°00'E, on a patrol line with Argo and Scirè. The compressor of her starboard diesel engine broke down but was repaired during the mission [mileage is from 31st July].
  5 Aug 19401830
(0) 70 miles SW of Asinara.
At 1830 hours, two torpedo tracks were observed. They missed the submarine at one minute interval, the first 250 metres ahead and the second 50 metres ahead. These were probably porpoises as no other submarine carried out an attack in this vicinity on that day.

Ferracuti, Carlo14 Aug 19400045La Maddalena14 Aug 19401954La Spezia205Passage La Maddalena-La Spezia.

Ferracuti, Carlo19 Sep 19400810La Spezia19 Sep 19401831La Spezia54Exercises with the submarine Fieramosca.

Ferracuti, Carlo20 Sep 19400800La Spezia20 Sep 19401857La Spezia27,5Exercises with the submarines Cappellini, H 1 and H 4.

Ferracuti, Carlo21 Sep 19400900La Spezia21 Sep 19401526La Spezia61Exercises with the submarines Scirè, Viniero and the auxiliaries Porto Sdobba and Rimini.

Ferracuti, Carlo27 Sep 19401350La Spezia27 Sep 19401802La Spezia22Exercises with the submarine Tazzolli.

Ferracuti, Carlo2 Oct 19400820La Spezia2 Oct 19401220La Spezia21Exercises.

Ferracuti, Carlo4 Oct 19400845La Spezia4 Oct 19401250La Spezia22Exercises.

Ferracuti, Carlo12 Oct 19400917La Spezia12 Oct 19401250La Spezia20Exercises.

Ferracuti, Carlo14 Oct 19401335La Spezia14 Oct 19401750La Spezia26Exercises with the submarines H 1, H 8 and the torpedo boat Curtatone.

Ferracuti, Carlo16 Oct 19400907La Spezia16 Oct 19401134La Spezia21Exercises.

Ferracuti, Carlo17 Oct 19400906La Spezia17 Oct 19401230La Spezia24Exercises with the torpedo boat Curtatone.

Ferracuti, Carlo18 Oct 19401400La Spezia18 Oct 19401800La Spezia25Exercises.

Ferracuti, Carlo21 Oct 19400906La Spezia21 Oct 19401215La Spezia19Exercises.

Ferracuti, Carlo22 Oct 19401345La Spezia22 Oct 19401750La Spezia23Exercises.

Ferracuti, Carlo29 Oct 19400855La Spezia29 Oct 19401237La Spezia23Exercises.

Ferracuti, Carlo31 Oct 19400850La Spezia31 Oct 19401120La Spezia17Exercises.

Ferracuti, Carlo9 Nov 19400855La Spezia9 Nov 19401250La Spezia22Exercises.

Ferracuti, Carlo10 Nov 19401500La Spezia10 Nov 19401736La Spezia21Exercises.

Ferracuti, Carlo15 Nov 19401240La Spezia17 Nov 19401645Messina490Passage La Spezia-Messina.
  16 Nov 19400530At 0530 hours, an Italian cruiser escorted by two destroyers was sighted on a northerly course. Neghelli made the recognition signal but was not answered.

Ferracuti, Carlo21 Nov 19401400Messina25 Nov 19401305Leros645Passage Messina-Leros. Uneventful.

4Ferracuti, Carlo11 Dec 19400600Leros22 Dec 19401415Leros1336Sailed for a patrol off Mersa Matruh between 31°40'N and 32°40'N. and between 26°40'E and 27°40'E.
  13 Dec 19402036
2042 (e)

(0) 340° - Mersa Matruh - 70 miles.
At 2022 hours, a shadow was sighted at a distance of 6,000 metres and was identified as a SOUTHAMPTON class cruiser.

At 2036 hours, range had closed to 1,900 metres when three torpedoes (533mm) were fired from the bow tubes at 12 seconds then 40 seconds intervals. One hit was heard 95 seconds after the first torpedo was fired and it hit the cruiser forward.

At 2038 hours, a fourth torpedo (450mm) was fired from a bow tube at a range of 1,600 metres. It missed. Neghelli was about to turn to fire stern torpedoes when the cruiser turned straight toward her, forcing her to submerge and the attack was foiled.

The target was the 4,190-ton antiaircraft cruiser HMS Coventry. She was on her way to join convoy A.N. 10 and was hit, losing part of her stern. There were no casualties. She could still make 13 knots and was joined by the destroyers of the 2nd Flotilla HMS Hyperion (D.2), HMS Mohawk and HMS Diamond at 0015 hours on the 14th. The escort was reinforced by the destroyers from the 14th Flotilla HMS Jervis (D.14), HMS Janus and HMS Hereward. The stricken cruiser and her escort arrived at Alexandria at noon on the 14th.

5Ferracuti, Carlo14 Jan 19410040Leros19 Jan 19411125Sunk with all handsSailed for patrol off Cerigo (Kythera) and east of Morea [orders mention that she sailed for area GIORGIO (?) and was allowed to go to area MARIO (?) and ARNALDO (?) and sub area LUIGI OVEST ?)]. Reported sunk by HMS Greyhound in 37°15'N, 24°04'E. No survivors, five officers and forty-one ratings lost.
  18 Jan 1941
1430 (e)

(0) Near Cape Sunion.
At 1430 hours, a Greek coast watcher reported sighting a submarine. The sighting may have been bogus, but there is a possibility it was Neghelli, who was lost the following day.
  19 Jan 1941
1125 (e)
On the morning of 19th January, Convoy A.S. 10 was proceeding from Piareus to Port Said. It consisted of the British transports Clan Cumming (7,264 GRT, built 1938), with Clan Macdonald (9,653 GRT, built 1939) and Empire Song (9,298 GRT, built 1940), the three vessels were ex-EXCESS convoy, escorted by the light cruiser HMS Calcutta and the destroyers HMS Greyhound, HMS Janus and HMS Defender.

At 1117C hours, HMS Defender obtained an ASDIC echo in 37°16,5' N, 24°03' E but it was then classified as "Non-Sub".

At 1125C hours, Clan Cumming was on the port wing of the convoy when she was hit forward by a torpedo. Despite being hit, she managed to make 10 knots and, escorted by Janus, she turned back and reached Piraeus at 1900 hours.

There is little doubt that her attacker was the submarine Neghelli.

HMS Greyhound obtained an ASDIC contact at 2,000 yards and carried out three attacks with a total of eighteen depth-charges (5 at 1130, 6 at 1139 and 7 at 1146 hours) set at 100, 150, 250 and 500 feet. No result could be observed. HMS Mohawk and HMS Hereward joined the escort of the two remaining ships at 1645 hours, relieving Greyhound and Defender.

A submarine was sighted off the Gulf of Petali at 2100 hours. This was about 40 miles from the area where Clan Cumming was torpedoed and thus well within the range of Neghelli had she survived the depth charge attack and retired to the northeast. If this sighting was genuine, this would mean that the submarine survived the depth-charging by Greyhound and may have been lost through other means, perhaps the victim of a Greek mine.

Clan Cumming did not survive her long, she was mined and sunk on 15th April 1941.

Neghelli did not return from her patrol and was lost lost with all hands. C.C. Carlo Ferracuti, four officers and forty-one ratings perished.

30 entries. 28 total patrol entries (5 marked as war patrols) and 8 events.

Events

GH 09.03.2021: This table kept here until we make fix the possible missing events in table above

CommanderDateTimePositionDescription
Carlo Ferracuti13 Jun 1940034043.10 N, 07.20 E
At 0240 hours, a 6,000-ton steamer was sighted proceeding with lights according to regulations. Neghelli closed to investigate but as the flag could not be made out and she was steering 240° toward Marseilles (or Toulon), an attack was prepared.

At 0340 hours, a single torpedo was fired from a bow tube (450mm, W.200 type) at a range of 1,800 metres. It missed as her speed was apparently 2-3 knots slower than initially estimated. C.C. Carlo Ferracuti decided not to pursue the action with the gun in order not to reveal his position. He was hoping to have more worthwhile targets.
Carlo Ferracuti13 Jun 19401445
1340 GMT (e)
43.10 N, 07.20 E
(e) 43.13 N, 07.17 E
(o) Approximately.
At 1445 hours, Neghelli was on a listening watch at a depth of 27 metres, when she was suddenly depth charged. She had not detected her aggressors.

These were the French destroyers La Bayonnaise and Baliste escorting the 15th Submarine Division (or 15e DSM: Vénus, Pallas, Iris and Archimède to take positions for the Vado operation. Both attacked the submarine with depth-charges.
Carlo Ferracuti6 Jul 19402200(o) Off Sardinia.At 2200 hours, the Italian steamer Derna (1,769 GRT, built 1912) was sighted at a distance of 2,500 metres, on a southerly course toward Cagliari.

Neghelli was not aware of the presence of Derna, fortunately the vessel promptly identified herself and the attack was aborted.
Carlo Ferracuti5 Aug 19401830(o) 70 miles SW of Asinara.At 1830 hours, two torpedo tracks were observed. They missed the submarine at one minute interval, the first 250 metres ahead and the second 50 metres ahead. These were probably porpoises as no other submarine carried out an attack in this vicinity on that day.
Carlo Ferracuti16 Nov 19400530At 0530 hours, an Italian cruiser escorted by two destroyers was sighted on a northerly course. Neghelli made the recognition signal but was not answered.
Carlo Ferracuti13 Dec 19402036
2042 (e)
(e) 32.27 N, 26.44 E
(o) 340° - Mersa Matruh - 70 miles.
At 2022 hours, a shadow was sighted at a distance of 6,000 metres and was identified as a SOUTHAMPTON class cruiser.

At 2036 hours, range had closed to 1,900 metres when three torpedoes (533mm) were fired from the bow tubes at 12 seconds then 40 seconds intervals. One hit was heard 95 seconds after the first torpedo was fired and it hit the cruiser forward.

At 2038 hours, a fourth torpedo (450mm) was fired from a bow tube at a range of 1,600 metres. It missed. Neghelli was about to turn to fire stern torpedoes when the cruiser turned straight toward her, forcing her to submerge and the attack was foiled.

The target was the 4,190-ton antiaircraft cruiser HMS Coventry. She was on her way to join convoy A.N. 10 and was hit, losing part of her stern. There were no casualties. She could still make 13 knots and was joined by the destroyers of the 2nd Flotilla HMS Hyperion (D.2), HMS Mohawk and HMS Diamond at 0015 hours on the 14th. The escort was reinforced by the destroyers from the 14th Flotilla HMS Jervis (D.14), HMS Janus and HMS Hereward. The stricken cruiser and her escort arrived at Alexandria at noon on the 14th.
Carlo Ferracuti18 Jan 1941
1430 (e)
(e) 37.40 N, 23.58 E
(o) Near Cape Sunion.
At 1430 hours, a Greek coast watcher reported sighting a submarine. The sighting may have been bogus, but there is a possibility it was Neghelli, who was lost the following day.
Carlo Ferracuti19 Jan 1941
1125 (e)
(e) 37.17 N, 24.05 E
On the morning of 19th January, Convoy A.S. 10 was proceeding from Piareus to Port Said. It consisted of the British transports Clan Cumming (7,264 GRT, built 1938), with Clan Macdonald (9,653 GRT, built 1939) and Empire Song (9,298 GRT, built 1940), the three vessels were ex-EXCESS convoy, escorted by the light cruiser HMS Calcutta and the destroyers HMS Greyhound, HMS Janus and HMS Defender.

At 1117C hours, HMS Defender obtained an ASDIC echo in 37°16,5' N, 24°03' E but it was then classified as "Non-Sub".

At 1125C hours, Clan Cumming was on the port wing of the convoy when she was hit forward by a torpedo. Despite being hit, she managed to make 10 knots and, escorted by Janus, she turned back and reached Piraeus at 1900 hours.

There is little doubt that her attacker was the submarine Neghelli.

HMS Greyhound obtained an ASDIC contact at 2,000 yards and carried out three attacks with a total of eighteen depth-charges (5 at 1130, 6 at 1139 and 7 at 1146 hours) set at 100, 150, 250 and 500 feet. No result could be observed. HMS Mohawk and HMS Hereward joined the escort of the two remaining ships at 1645 hours, relieving Greyhound and Defender.

A submarine was sighted off the Gulf of Petali at 2100 hours. This was about 40 miles from the area where Clan Cumming was torpedoed and thus well within the range of Neghelli had she survived the depth charge attack and retired to the northeast. If this sighting was genuine, this would mean that the submarine survived the depth-charging by Greyhound and may have been lost through other means, perhaps the victim of a Greek mine.

Clan Cumming did not survive her long, she was mined and sunk on 15th April 1941.

Neghelli did not return from her patrol and was lost lost with all hands. C.C. Carlo Ferracuti, four officers and forty-one ratings perished.

All Italian submarines