Italian submarines in World War Two

Italian Commanders


Alberto Agostini

Born  14 Nov 1907Rome

Ranks

  C.C.Capitano di Corvetta

Decorations

Career information

MOCENIGO (C.C. C.O.): fFrom 25.10.1940 to 04.09.1941.
AMMIRAGLIO CARACCIOLO (C.C. C.O.): from 01.10.1941 to 20.11.1941.
VETTOR PISANI (C.C. C.O.): from 12.12.1941 to 17.01.1942.
GIOVANNI BAUSAN (C.C. C.O.): from 18.01.1942 to 12.02.1942.
LUCIANO MANARA C.C. C.O.): from 14.02.1942 to 03.06.1942.
Head of 12° GRUPSOM (Pola) from 12.02.1942.
Joined R.S.I.

Commands listed for Alberto Agostini


Submarine Type Rank From
Mocenigo (MO, I.19)Ocean goingC.C.25 Oct 19404 Sep 1941
Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)Ocean goingC.C.1 Oct 194120 Nov 1941
Vettor Pisani (PN)Ocean goingC.C.12 Dec 194117 Jan 1942
Giovanni Bausan (BN)Ocean goingC.C.18 Jan 194212 Feb 1942
Luciana Manara (MR)Ocean goingC.C.14 Feb 19423 Jun 1942

War patrols listed for Alberto Agostini

 SubmarineDateTimePortArr. dateArr. timeArr. portMilesDescription
Mocenigo (MO, I.19)15 Nov 19401255La Spezia15 Nov 19401805La Spezia31Exercises.

Mocenigo (MO, I.19)16 Nov 19401130La Spezia16 Nov 19401200La Spezia0,8Changed moorings?

Mocenigo (MO, I.19)19 Nov 19401125La Spezia19 Nov 19401203La Spezia0,8Changed moorings?

Mocenigo (MO, I.19)20 Nov 19401104La Spezia20 Nov 19401730La Spezia29,7Exercises.

Mocenigo (MO, I.19)22 Nov 19400828La Spezia22 Nov 19401430La Spezia0,6Tests?

1.Mocenigo (MO, I.19)24 Nov 19400730La Spezia26 Dec 19401735Bordeaux4220Passage to Bordeaux. Passed Gibraltar on 30th November 1940. Patrolled between 41°00'N and 42°00'N (later extended to 40°00'N), and between 20°00'W and 28°00'W. Suffered from bad weather, four men were lost overboard. Sighted several times Spanish and Portuguese ships. Then refit until the end of February 1941.
  2 Dec 19400936
0950 (e)

(e) 36° 05'N, 9° 50'W
(0) 36.02N, 09.42W.
At 0936 hours, Mocenigo sighted a destroyer at 9-10,000 metres and altered course to attack. At 0954 hours, the destroyer apparently had also discovered the submarine and turned toward her. Mocenigo crash dived to 100 metres. The destroyer dropped four depth-charges at 1000 hours, two at 1006, three at 1014, eleven at 1018, fourteen at 1025, three at 1031 and three more at 1037 hours, but the submarine escaped damage. This was HMS Kelvin which was escorting the battleship HMS Royal Sovereign together with HMS Jaguar. The submarine had been sighted by the battleship at a range of 8 miles.
  21 Dec 19402209
2117 (e)
40° 45'N, 16° 50'W
(e) 40° 47'N, 16° 47'W
At 1215 hours, Mocenigo sighted smokes on the horizon at a distance of 20-25,000 metres. It appeared to be eight or nine steamers steering 150° at 7-8 knots. The submarine assumed a parallel course maintaining herself at the limit of visibility, with the intention of closing to the attack after dark. At 1430 hours, a destroyer was observed slightly closer, but frequent rain squalls made it difficult to maintain an adequate distance and contact was occasionally lost. At 2200 hours, contact was regained at a distance of 4,000 metres.

At 2209 hours, two torpedoes (the first 533mm and the second 450mm) were fired in short succession from the bow tubes at one of three large steamers at distance of 600 metres. This was followed very quickly by two more torpedoes (533mm) aimed at a second steamer. A tall column of water appeared next to the first target, and a small explosion on the second target led Agostini to believe that both vessels had been hit.

At 2214 hours, Mocenigo had reverted course to fire two stern torpedoes (533mm) from a distance of 600-700 metres, each aimed at two steamers following the first trio. The first was hit and was capsizing. Agostini intended to fire another torpedo at an escort, but the warship opened fire, forcing the submarine to crash dive. Mocenigo had reached a depth of 60 metres when she was shaken by the explosions of two or three depth charges. She finally reached a depth of 95 metres when the electric motors were stopped.

In all, Agostini claimed to have sunk two steamers for a total of 19,000 GRT and damaged a third vessel of 8,000 GRT.

In fact, he had hit and sunk only one steamer, the Swedish Mangen (1,253 GRT, built 1934) from convoy O.G.47 (Liverpool to Gibraltar). Her crew had observed a torpedo to pass under her at 2114 hours but at 2117 hours another torpedo hit her squarely and she sank in 3 minutes. Eight men were killed, her survivors were picked up by the Swedish steamer Garm (1,231 GRT, built 1912). The escorting sloop HMS Leith reported that she had fired star shells but had been unable to detect the U-boat.
  22 Dec 19401703
1540 BST (e)
41° 10'N, 14° 44'W
(e) 41° 18'N, 15° 14'W
At 1550 hours, at a distance of 10-11,000 metres, Mocenigo sighted a 3,000-ton steamer proceeding on a 120-130° course at 7-8 knots. Having closed to 5-6,000 metres, the submarine fired a warning shot, but the vessel did not stop and kept on her original course. At 1705 hours, the submarine opened fire at a range of 4-5,000 metres. The vessel turned away to port and opened fire with her stern gun. After three rounds, the submarine's forward gun had to stop firing as the heavy seas made it very difficult to man and her course prevented the aft gun to bear. The enemy's fire was becoming more accurate and at a distance of 4,500 metres, C.C. Agostini decided to break off the action and submerge.

As the order was given, an enemy round hit the conning tower. The shock brought the hatch down and it could not be properly opened, but water seeped through it. The control room was filled with a yellow smoke. Agostini and the men on the bridge were in a precarious position. They could not enter the submarine or communicate with the personnel in the control room, as the shell had severed the interphone cable. A wave carried two ratings and they disppeared. Inside the submarine, it was realised that something had gone wrong and very quickly the diving order was countermanded.

Although Mocenigo had turned away using her electric motors, she was still under fire from the enemy vessel and the rounds were falling very close. One hit the conning tower in the upper kitchen area (used to cook pasta when surfaced), another exploded very close to the hull, peppering the conning tower with fragments. The submarine replied with her stern and machine guns, claiming one or two hits, but another wave carried away two ratings. In the meantime, the forward hatch had been opened, Agostini had managed to pass the order to get the diesels underway at full speed and the submarine finally pulled away.

The target had been the British Sarastone (2,473 GRT, built 1929) , on passage from Barry Docks to Gibraltar she was carrying 4,060 tons of coal and was a straggler of convoy O.G.47 due to boiler defects. She had replied with a 12-pdr gun (twenty-three rounds fired, and had only seven left after the action) when the range closed to 2,000 yds and then with a machine-gun. She was undamaged and escaped. Mocenigo's troubles were not over. A wave closed the forward hatch, forcing the diesels to temporarily shut down, but efforts finally managed to get the conning tower hatch opened, the interphone cable repaired and communications with the bridge finally re-established. A search was now made out for the four missing men but only one body was recovered. The mood in the submarine was somber as prayers for the dead men were read in the dark by the First Officer. The submarine returned to Bordeaux.

Mocenigo (MO, I.19)1 Mar 19410835Bordeaux1 Mar 19411220Le Verdon60Passage Bordeaux-Le Verdon.

Mocenigo (MO, I.19)2 Mar 19410800Le Verdon2 Mar 19411626La Pallice68Passage Le Verdon-La Pallice escorted by the German patrol boats V-406, V-412 and V-1607 and trials at le Pertuis d'Antioche.

Mocenigo (MO, I.19)3 Mar 19411105La Pallice3 Mar 19411805La Pallice29Trials at le Pertuis d'Antioche.

Mocenigo (MO, I.19)4 Mar 19410940La Pallice4 Mar 19411130La Pallice0,2Tests?

2.Mocenigo (MO, I.19)5 Mar 19411850La Pallice26 Mar 19411907Bordeaux3605Sailed for Atlantic patrol between 53°00'N and 54°00'N and between 21°00'W and 25°00'W. Sighted only two fishing vessels on 6th March (probably French) and the submarine Emo on her return passage.
  9 Mar 1941010048° 37'N, 13° 14'WAt 0100 hours, Mocenigo was informed that, at 1300 hours on the 8th, an aircraft had sighted a large convoy in Italian Grid 5689/42, course 250°, 7 knots. The submarine altered course to intercept Heavy seas prevented her from going more than 6 knots but, by morning she managed to increase speed to 10 knots and was trying to intercept on longitude 31°00' W. At 0504 hours the next day, Mocenigo [when in 51°00' N, 18°42' W] received a signal from Emo, indicating that an aircraft carrier with destroyers were sighted in Grid 3212, steering 210°, 15 knots. Agostini decided to abandon the chase.
  19 Mar 1941115553° 20'N, 24° 18'WAt 1155 hours, Mocenigo received a signal indicating that a convoy of 20-30 ships had been seen at 0845 hours on the 19th in 55°05' N, 12°35' W (Italian Grid 4031/14) course 240°, 7 knots. The submarine altered course to 100° at 12 knots to intercept. At 1310 hours on the 19th [when in 53°25' N, 24°27' W], another signal reported a German U-boat in contact at 1100 hours with a convoy of 25 vessels in Grid 0607/44 (54°35' N, ?°35 W) steering 230°, 8 knots and the submarine altered course to 105°.

At 1905 hours on the 19th [Mocenigo was now in 53°14' N, 22°30' W], another signal now indicated a convoy of 20-30 ships at 1730 hours on the 19th in 54°25' N, 15°05' W (Grid 0645/13) steering 260°, 8 knots. Agostini decided to intercept the convoy signaled at 1100 hours on the 19th. However, as of 1029 hours on the 20th, nothing had been sighted.
  21 Mar 1941150553° 52'N, 19° 25'WMocenigo was informed that a convoy had been seen at 1400 hours on the 21st in 51°55' N, 21°15' W (Italian Grid 2750/62) course 070°, 7 knots. The submarine altered course to 160° at 10 knots, to intercept the enemy 20 miles ahead. Agostini did not increase to 12 knots, as at this speed fuel consumption was twice that of 10 knots. At 2105 hours on the 21st (Mocenigo was then in 53°05' N, 18°05' W), she received a signal of a convoy at 1845 hours in 51°45 N, 19°45 W (Grid 2712/55), course 090°, 8 knots. Once again she altered course to 125°, but sighted nothing.
  24 Mar 1941151046° 13'N, 7° 45'WAn unidentified aircraft was sighted at 10,000 metres and the submarine dived.

Mocenigo (MO, I.19)16 May 19410915Bordeaux16 May 19411500Bordeaux1Demagnetization.

Mocenigo (MO, I.19)19 May 19411340Bordeaux19 May 19411808Le Verdon52Passage Bordeaux-Le Verdon.

Mocenigo (MO, I.19)20 May 19410610Le Verdon20 May 19410925Le VerdonTrials off Le Verdon.

Mocenigo (MO, I.19)20 May 19411000Le Verdon20 May 19412100La Pallice103Passage Le Verdon-La Pallice and trials at Le Pertuis d'Antioche [mileage is forth both sorties of the day].

3.Mocenigo (MO, I.19)20 May 19411340La Pallice13 Jun 19411150Pauillac4959,6Patrolled in zone centred on 34°15'N, 08°15'W.
  24 May 19411235
1324 (e)
41° 06'N, 10° 42'W
(e) 41° 04'N, 11° 12'W
At 1235 hours, a submarine was observed at a distance of 10-15 miles. Mocenigo turned away and made a recognition signal, but was it was not answered. At first, the other submarine appeared to move away but then returned to follow Mocenigo. At 1429 hours, Agostini decided to make a submerged attack as heavy seas precluded a gun duel. At periscope depth, the enemy submarine could not be seen and Agostini assumed she had also dived. Nothing could be heard with the hydrophones and at 1537 hours, the Italian submarine surfaced and resumed passage.

The other submarine was HMS Pandora (Lt. Cdr. J.W. Linton), on passage from Gibraltar to Portsmouth. She had sighted the Italian submarine at a range of 7 miles, had not replied to her signals and fired off two 4-inch rounds at 12,000 yards (they must have fallen wide as they do not appear to have been observed by Mocenigo).
  26 May 1941210034° 05'N, 8° 32'WAt 2100 hours, two fishing vessels were observed but left undisturbed.
  27 May 1941081734° 25'N, 8° 34'WAt 0817 hours, a 2,000-ton vessel was sighted at 10-15,000 metres. Mocenigo closed to 800 metres and then identified her as Spanish. The attack was aborted.
  27 May 1941164234° 11'N, 8° 19'WAt 1642 hours, a smoke was sighted on the horizon and later identified as a 3,000-ton Spanish vessel, proceeding on a 210° course at 7 knots. She was left undisturbed. During the following days, several Spanish or Portuguese vessels were sighted.
  30 May 19410442
0357 (e)
35° 24'N, 8° 21'W
(e) 35° 28'N, 8° 11'E
At 1918 hours on 29th May, Mocenigo altered course after being informed by BETASOM that at 1600 hours Argo was in contact with a convoy of ten ships escorted by a destroyer in 35°55' N, 06°55' W, steering 240°, 8 knots. At 0023 hours, Argo signaled that she had lost contact and an hour later Mocenigo had still failed to find anything but at 0440 hours, in 35°24' N, 08°21' W, a tanker was observed at a distance of 1,500 metres, steering of about 040°. Two minutes later, a torpedo was fired from tube no. 3. It left a very luminous track, but missed ahead.

In the meantime, the submarine had reverted course and fired a stern shot, but it also missed and, once again she reverted course. At 0456 hours, a torpedo was fired from tube no. 1. It had an irregular course and also missed. Six minutes later, the submarine fired successively torpedoes from tubes no. 4 and no. 2 and heard two loud explosions. Mocenigo moved away but with the intention of renewing the attack. However, she lost contact. The tanker was British Yeoman (6,990 GRT, built 1923). She had initially reported being torpedoed but she arrived at Gibraltar with only slight damage (from what?). The destroyers HMS Forester and HMS Fury and four motor launches were sent to hunt the submarine but without success.
  7 Jun 1941120033° 10'N, 15° 56'W
(0) Italian Grid 3915/26.
At 1200 hours, the submarine Brin was encountered and there was a vocal exchange. She had not sighted the convoy and proposed to search for it on 180° course, while Mocenigo would do the same on a 360° course. At 1615 hours nothing was sighted and the chase was abandoned.

Mocenigo (MO, I.19)13 Jun 19411820Pauillac13 Jun 19412140BordeauxPassage Pauillac-Bordeaux.

Mocenigo (MO, I.19)29 Jun 19411040Bordeaux29 Jun 19411100Bordeaux0,2Changed moorings.

Mocenigo (MO, I.19)24 Jul 19410930Bordeaux24 Jul 19411250Bordeaux1Trials.

4.Mocenigo (MO, I.19)10 Aug 19410902Bordeaux12 Aug 19412040Bordeaux575,5Sailed for La Spezia, but turned back because of defects.

Mocenigo (MO, I.19)14 Aug 19411000Bordeaux14 Aug 19411432Bordeaux45Exercises.

Mocenigo (MO, I.19)16 Aug 19411426Bordeaux16 Aug 19411756Le VerdonPassage Bordeaux-Le Verdon.

5.Mocenigo (MO, I.19)16 Aug 19411947Le Verdon28 Aug 19411018La Spezia2319Sailed with Otaria for passage Le Verdon-La Spezia. Passed Gibraltar on 23rd August 1941. Uneventful.

Mocenigo (MO, I.19)1 Sep 19410813Le Verdon1 Sep 19410822La Spezia0,1Changed moorings.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)3 Oct 19411350Fiume3 Oct 19411858Fiume46Exercises. Upon her return, she slightly damaged her bow while attempting to moor alongside the quay.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)4 Oct 19410836Fiume4 Oct 19411817Fiume107Diving trials, reached 104 metres.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)7 Oct 19410929Fiume7 Oct 19411305Fiume19Exercises.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)8 Oct 19410839Fiume8 Oct 19411245Fiume24Exercises.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)16 Oct 19410904Fiume16 Oct 19411151Fiume15Exercises.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)18 Oct 1941Fiume18 Oct 1941FiumeSortie (presumably for exercises) but damaged her screw after a collision with the tug Belroire.
  18 Oct 1941
(0) At Fiume.
While shifting position in the port of Fiume, Ammiraglio Caracciolo collided with the tug Belroire and damaged a propeller.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)22 Oct 19410806Fiume22 Oct 19411240Pola60Passage Fiume-Pola.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)25 Oct 19410940Pola25 Oct 19411640Pola50Exercises escorted by the auxiliary Salvore.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)26 Oct 19410810Pola26 Oct 19411809Pola55Trials escorted my the torpedo boat Audace and the auxiliary Grado.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)27 Oct 19411230Pola27 Oct 19411812Pola16Exercises.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)28 Oct 19410847Pola28 Oct 19411502Pola47Exercises with the submarine Galatea, escorted by the auxiliary Verbano and the torpedo boat Audace.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)29 Oct 19410908Pola29 Oct 19411310Fiume60Passage Pola-Fiume.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)30 Oct 19410837Fiume30 Oct 19410904Fiume3Exercises.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)31 Oct 19410916Fiume31 Oct 19411525Fiume15Exercises escorted by the auxiliary Abbazia.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)11 Nov 19410945Fiume11 Nov 19411200FiumeExercises with the destroyer Da Mosto.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)12 Nov 19411000Fiume12 Nov 19411700FiumeTrials with the destroyer Da Mosto.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)15 Nov 19410855Fiume15 Nov 19411655FiumeTrials.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)18 Nov 19410834Fiume18 Nov 19411529Pola72Passage Fiume-Pola and exercising with the destroyer Da Mosto to test her sonar.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)19 Nov 19410810Pola19 Nov 19411630PolaExercises.

Ammiraglio Caracciolo (CC)21 Nov 19411630?Pola21 Nov 19411630PolaExercises then docked.

Vettor Pisani (PN)16 Dec 19410805Pola16 Dec 19411720Pola53,5Exercises.

Vettor Pisani (PN)19 Dec 19410830Pola19 Dec 19411644Pola59,5Exercises with the submarine Mameli, escorted by the auxiliary San Giorgio.

Vettor Pisani (PN)12 Jan 19420840Pola12 Jan 19421640Pola15Exercises.

Vettor Pisani (PN)13 Jan 19420832Pola13 Jan 19421657Pola47Exercises with submarine Medusa, escorted by the auxiliary Grado.

Giovanni Bausan (BN)18 Jan 1942Fiume12 Feb 1942FiumeRefit.

Luciana Manara (MR)18 Feb 19420845Naples18 Feb 19421620Naples39Gyrocompass tests.

Luciana Manara (MR)20 Feb 19420850Naples20 Feb 19421622Naples29Trials.

Luciana Manara (MR)22 Feb 19421521Naples23 Feb 19421535Messina220Passage Naples-Messina.

Luciana Manara (MR)3 Mar 19421559Messina6 Mar 19421140Pola652Passage Messina-Pola. Sighted only Italian vessels.
  3 Mar 1942102842° 11'N, 16° 31'EA derelict mine was sunk by machine gun fire.

Luciana Manara (MR)16 Mar 19421215Pola16 Mar 19421729Fiume61Passage Pola-Fiume.

Luciana Manara (MR)18 Mar 19420925Fiume18 Mar 19421925FiumeExercises with Asteria and Jalea, escorted by the auxiliaries Jadera and Abbazia.

Luciana Manara (MR)1 Apr 19420928Fiume1 Apr 19421730Fiume16Exercises with Asteria and Jalea, escorted by the torpedo boat Audace, the auxiliary Jadera and two motorboats.

Luciana Manara (MR)3 Apr 19422115Fiume3 Apr 19422355Fiume22Exercises with the submarines Pisani and Asteria, escorted by the torpedo boat Audace and the auxiliary San Giorgio.

Luciana Manara (MR)4 Apr 19420840Fiume4 Apr 19421230Fiume5,5Exercises with the submarines Pisani and Asteria, escorted by the torpedo boat Audace and Jadera.

Luciana Manara (MR)7 Apr 19421410Fiume7 Apr 19422323Fiume31Exercises with the submarine Pisani, escorted by the auxiliaries Jadera and Abbazia.

Luciana Manara (MR)8 Apr 19420905Fiume8 Apr 19421543Fiume12Exercises with the submarines Jalea and Asteria, escorted by the auxiliaries Abbazia and Trau.

Luciana Manara (MR)8 Apr 19422000Fiume9 Apr 19420207Fiume46,5Exercises, escorted by the auxiliaries Abbazia and Trau.

Luciana Manara (MR)10 Apr 19421411Fiume11 Apr 19420145Fiume42Exercises with the submarine Manara, escorted by the torpedo boat Insidioso and the auxiliary Trau.

Luciana Manara (MR)11 Apr 19421000Fiume11 Apr 19421421Fiume16Exercises with the submarines Diaspro, Jalea and Asteria, escorted by the torpedo boat Insidioso and the auxiliary Jadera.

Luciana Manara (MR)16 Apr 19421230Fiume17 Apr 19420105Fiume50,5Exercises with the submarine Jalea, escorted by the torpedo boat Insidioso and the auxiliary Jadera.

Luciana Manara (MR)18 Apr 19420936Fiume18 Apr 19421345Fiume24Exercises, escorted by the auxiliary Jadera.

Luciana Manara (MR)21 Apr 19421225Fiume21 Apr 19422112Fiume32Exercises, escorted by the torpedo boat T.3 and the auxiliary Jadera.

Luciana Manara (MR)23 Apr 19420930Fiume24 Apr 19420059Fiume54,5Exercises, escorted by the torpedo boat T.3.

Luciana Manara (MR)25 Apr 19421008Fiume25 Apr 19421507Fiume14Exercises with the submarine Jalea, escorted by the torpedo boat T.3.

Luciana Manara (MR)28 Apr 19421240Fiume29 Apr 19420015Fiume48Exercises with the submarines Jalea and Giada, escorted by the torpedo boat Audace.

Luciana Manara (MR)30 Apr 19421304Fiume30 Apr 19422345Fiume40Exercises with the submarines Jalea and Giada, escorted by the torpedo boat Audace.

Luciana Manara (MR)4 May 19421227Fiume5 May 19420223Fiume81Exercises with the submarine Diaspro, escorted by the torpedo boat Audace.

Luciana Manara (MR)6 May 19421445Fiume6 May 19421706Fiume22Exercises.

Luciana Manara (MR)8 May 19421255Fiume9 May 19420104Fiume82Exercises with the submarine Diaspro, escorted by the auxiliary Jadera.

Luciana Manara (MR)11 May 19421415Fiume11 May 19422245Fiume35Exercises with the submarines Giada and Jalea, escorted by the torpedo boat T.3.

Luciana Manara (MR)13 May 19421105Fiume13 May 19421600Fiume18Exercises.

Luciana Manara (MR)15 May 19421351Fiume15 May 19422030Fiume26Exercises with the submarine Jalea, escorted by the torpedo boat Insidioso.

Luciana Manara (MR)18 May 19421131Fiume19 May 19420216Fiume55Exercises.

Luciana Manara (MR)20 May 19421415Fiume21 May 19420210Fiume49Exercises with the submarine Menotti, escorted by the torpedo boat Insidioso.

Luciana Manara (MR)22 May 19421430Fiume22 May 19422005Fiume23Exercises with the submarine Menotti, escorted by the torpedo boat Insidioso.

Luciana Manara (MR)25 May 19421427Fiume26 May 19420132Fiume27Exercises, escorted by the auxiliary San Giorgio.

Luciana Manara (MR)27 May 19421422Fiume28 May 19420145Fiume52Exercises, escorted by the torpedo boat Insidioso.

Luciana Manara (MR)29 May 19420930Fiume30 May 19420145Fiume63Exercises, escorted by the torpedo boat Insidioso.

Luciana Manara (MR)1 Jun 19421430Fiume2 Jun 19420115Fiume65Exercises.

Luciana Manara (MR)3 Jun 19421416Fiume4 Jun 19420255Fiume70,5Exercises with the submarines Ascianghi and Menotti, escorted by the torpedo boat Insidioso.

94 entries. 84 total patrol entries (5 marked as war patrols) and 15 events.

Events listed for Alberto Agostini

GH 09.03.2021: This table kept here until we make fix the possible missing events in table above

SubmarineDateTimePositionDescription
Luciana Manara3 Mar 1942102842.11 N, 16.31 E
A derelict mine was sunk by machine gun fire.
Mocenigo2 Dec 19400936
0950 (e)
(e) 36.05 N, 09.50 W
(o) 36.02N, 09.42W.
At 0936 hours, Mocenigo sighted a destroyer at 9-10,000 metres and altered course to attack. At 0954 hours, the destroyer apparently had also discovered the submarine and turned toward her. Mocenigo crash dived to 100 metres. The destroyer dropped four depth-charges at 1000 hours, two at 1006, three at 1014, eleven at 1018, fourteen at 1025, three at 1031 and three more at 1037 hours, but the submarine escaped damage. This was HMS Kelvin which was escorting the battleship HMS Royal Sovereign together with HMS Jaguar. The submarine had been sighted by the battleship at a range of 8 miles.
Mocenigo21 Dec 19402209
2117 (e)
40.45 N, 16.50 W
(e) 40.47 N, 16.47 W
At 1215 hours, Mocenigo sighted smokes on the horizon at a distance of 20-25,000 metres. It appeared to be eight or nine steamers steering 150° at 7-8 knots. The submarine assumed a parallel course maintaining herself at the limit of visibility, with the intention of closing to the attack after dark. At 1430 hours, a destroyer was observed slightly closer, but frequent rain squalls made it difficult to maintain an adequate distance and contact was occasionally lost. At 2200 hours, contact was regained at a distance of 4,000 metres.

At 2209 hours, two torpedoes (the first 533mm and the second 450mm) were fired in short succession from the bow tubes at one of three large steamers at distance of 600 metres. This was followed very quickly by two more torpedoes (533mm) aimed at a second steamer. A tall column of water appeared next to the first target, and a small explosion on the second target led Agostini to believe that both vessels had been hit.

At 2214 hours, Mocenigo had reverted course to fire two stern torpedoes (533mm) from a distance of 600-700 metres, each aimed at two steamers following the first trio. The first was hit and was capsizing. Agostini intended to fire another torpedo at an escort, but the warship opened fire, forcing the submarine to crash dive. Mocenigo had reached a depth of 60 metres when she was shaken by the explosions of two or three depth charges. She finally reached a depth of 95 metres when the electric motors were stopped.

In all, Agostini claimed to have sunk two steamers for a total of 19,000 GRT and damaged a third vessel of 8,000 GRT.

In fact, he had hit and sunk only one steamer, the Swedish Mangen (1,253 GRT, built 1934) from convoy O.G.47 (Liverpool to Gibraltar). Her crew had observed a torpedo to pass under her at 2114 hours but at 2117 hours another torpedo hit her squarely and she sank in 3 minutes. Eight men were killed, her survivors were picked up by the Swedish steamer Garm (1,231 GRT, built 1912). The escorting sloop HMS Leith reported that she had fired star shells but had been unable to detect the U-boat.
Mocenigo22 Dec 19401703
1540 BST (e)
41.10 N, 14.44 W
(e) 41.18 N, 15.14 W
At 1550 hours, at a distance of 10-11,000 metres, Mocenigo sighted a 3,000-ton steamer proceeding on a 120-130° course at 7-8 knots. Having closed to 5-6,000 metres, the submarine fired a warning shot, but the vessel did not stop and kept on her original course. At 1705 hours, the submarine opened fire at a range of 4-5,000 metres. The vessel turned away to port and opened fire with her stern gun. After three rounds, the submarine's forward gun had to stop firing as the heavy seas made it very difficult to man and her course prevented the aft gun to bear. The enemy's fire was becoming more accurate and at a distance of 4,500 metres, C.C. Agostini decided to break off the action and submerge.

As the order was given, an enemy round hit the conning tower. The shock brought the hatch down and it could not be properly opened, but water seeped through it. The control room was filled with a yellow smoke. Agostini and the men on the bridge were in a precarious position. They could not enter the submarine or communicate with the personnel in the control room, as the shell had severed the interphone cable. A wave carried two ratings and they disppeared. Inside the submarine, it was realised that something had gone wrong and very quickly the diving order was countermanded.

Although Mocenigo had turned away using her electric motors, she was still under fire from the enemy vessel and the rounds were falling very close. One hit the conning tower in the upper kitchen area (used to cook pasta when surfaced), another exploded very close to the hull, peppering the conning tower with fragments. The submarine replied with her stern and machine guns, claiming one or two hits, but another wave carried away two ratings. In the meantime, the forward hatch had been opened, Agostini had managed to pass the order to get the diesels underway at full speed and the submarine finally pulled away.

The target had been the British Sarastone (2,473 GRT, built 1929) , on passage from Barry Docks to Gibraltar she was carrying 4,060 tons of coal and was a straggler of convoy O.G.47 due to boiler defects. She had replied with a 12-pdr gun (twenty-three rounds fired, and had only seven left after the action) when the range closed to 2,000 yds and then with a machine-gun. She was undamaged and escaped. Mocenigo's troubles were not over. A wave closed the forward hatch, forcing the diesels to temporarily shut down, but efforts finally managed to get the conning tower hatch opened, the interphone cable repaired and communications with the bridge finally re-established. A search was now made out for the four missing men but only one body was recovered. The mood in the submarine was somber as prayers for the dead men were read in the dark by the First Officer. The submarine returned to Bordeaux.
Mocenigo9 Mar 1941010048.37 N, 13.14 W
At 0100 hours, Mocenigo was informed that, at 1300 hours on the 8th, an aircraft had sighted a large convoy in Italian Grid 5689/42, course 250°, 7 knots. The submarine altered course to intercept Heavy seas prevented her from going more than 6 knots but, by morning she managed to increase speed to 10 knots and was trying to intercept on longitude 31°00' W. At 0504 hours the next day, Mocenigo [when in 51°00' N, 18°42' W] received a signal from Emo, indicating that an aircraft carrier with destroyers were sighted in Grid 3212, steering 210°, 15 knots. Agostini decided to abandon the chase.
Mocenigo19 Mar 1941115553.20 N, 24.18 W
At 1155 hours, Mocenigo received a signal indicating that a convoy of 20-30 ships had been seen at 0845 hours on the 19th in 55°05' N, 12°35' W (Italian Grid 4031/14) course 240°, 7 knots. The submarine altered course to 100° at 12 knots to intercept. At 1310 hours on the 19th [when in 53°25' N, 24°27' W], another signal reported a German U-boat in contact at 1100 hours with a convoy of 25 vessels in Grid 0607/44 (54°35' N, ?°35 W) steering 230°, 8 knots and the submarine altered course to 105°.

At 1905 hours on the 19th [Mocenigo was now in 53°14' N, 22°30' W], another signal now indicated a convoy of 20-30 ships at 1730 hours on the 19th in 54°25' N, 15°05' W (Grid 0645/13) steering 260°, 8 knots. Agostini decided to intercept the convoy signaled at 1100 hours on the 19th. However, as of 1029 hours on the 20th, nothing had been sighted.
Mocenigo21 Mar 1941150553.52 N, 19.25 W
Mocenigo was informed that a convoy had been seen at 1400 hours on the 21st in 51°55' N, 21°15' W (Italian Grid 2750/62) course 070°, 7 knots. The submarine altered course to 160° at 10 knots, to intercept the enemy 20 miles ahead. Agostini did not increase to 12 knots, as at this speed fuel consumption was twice that of 10 knots. At 2105 hours on the 21st (Mocenigo was then in 53°05' N, 18°05' W), she received a signal of a convoy at 1845 hours in 51°45 N, 19°45 W (Grid 2712/55), course 090°, 8 knots. Once again she altered course to 125°, but sighted nothing.
Mocenigo24 Mar 1941151046.13 N, 07.45 W
An unidentified aircraft was sighted at 10,000 metres and the submarine dived.
Mocenigo24 May 19411235
1324 (e)
41.06 N, 10.42 W
(e) 41.04 N, 11.12 W
At 1235 hours, a submarine was observed at a distance of 10-15 miles. Mocenigo turned away and made a recognition signal, but was it was not answered. At first, the other submarine appeared to move away but then returned to follow Mocenigo. At 1429 hours, Agostini decided to make a submerged attack as heavy seas precluded a gun duel. At periscope depth, the enemy submarine could not be seen and Agostini assumed she had also dived. Nothing could be heard with the hydrophones and at 1537 hours, the Italian submarine surfaced and resumed passage.

The other submarine was HMS Pandora (Lt. Cdr. J.W. Linton), on passage from Gibraltar to Portsmouth. She had sighted the Italian submarine at a range of 7 miles, had not replied to her signals and fired off two 4-inch rounds at 12,000 yards (they must have fallen wide as they do not appear to have been observed by Mocenigo).
Mocenigo26 May 1941210034.05 N, 08.32 W
At 2100 hours, two fishing vessels were observed but left undisturbed.
Mocenigo27 May 1941081734.25 N, 08.34 W
At 0817 hours, a 2,000-ton vessel was sighted at 10-15,000 metres. Mocenigo closed to 800 metres and then identified her as Spanish. The attack was aborted.
Mocenigo27 May 1941164234.11 N, 08.19 W
At 1642 hours, a smoke was sighted on the horizon and later identified as a 3,000-ton Spanish vessel, proceeding on a 210° course at 7 knots. She was left undisturbed. During the following days, several Spanish or Portuguese vessels were sighted.
Mocenigo30 May 19410442
0357 (e)
35.24 N, 08.21 W
(e) 35.28 N, 08.11 E
At 1918 hours on 29th May, Mocenigo altered course after being informed by BETASOM that at 1600 hours Argo was in contact with a convoy of ten ships escorted by a destroyer in 35°55' N, 06°55' W, steering 240°, 8 knots. At 0023 hours, Argo signaled that she had lost contact and an hour later Mocenigo had still failed to find anything but at 0440 hours, in 35°24' N, 08°21' W, a tanker was observed at a distance of 1,500 metres, steering of about 040°. Two minutes later, a torpedo was fired from tube no. 3. It left a very luminous track, but missed ahead.

In the meantime, the submarine had reverted course and fired a stern shot, but it also missed and, once again she reverted course. At 0456 hours, a torpedo was fired from tube no. 1. It had an irregular course and also missed. Six minutes later, the submarine fired successively torpedoes from tubes no. 4 and no. 2 and heard two loud explosions. Mocenigo moved away but with the intention of renewing the attack. However, she lost contact. The tanker was British Yeoman (6,990 GRT, built 1923). She had initially reported being torpedoed but she arrived at Gibraltar with only slight damage (from what?). The destroyers HMS Forester and HMS Fury and four motor launches were sent to hunt the submarine but without success.
Mocenigo7 Jun 1941120033.10 N, 15.56 W
(o) Italian Grid 3915/26.
At 1200 hours, the submarine Brin was encountered and there was a vocal exchange. She had not sighted the convoy and proposed to search for it on 180° course, while Mocenigo would do the same on a 360° course. At 1615 hours nothing was sighted and the chase was abandoned.
Ammiraglio Caracciolo18 Oct 1941(o) At Fiume.While shifting position in the port of Fiume, Ammiraglio Caracciolo collided with the tug Belroire and damaged a propeller.

Italian Commanders

Italian Submarines