Allied Warships

HMS Shakespeare (P 221)

Submarine of the S class

NavyThe Royal Navy
TypeSubmarine
ClassS 
PennantP 221 
Built byVickers Armstrong (Barrow-in-Furness, U.K.) 
Ordered4 Apr 1940 
Laid down13 Nov 1940 
Launched8 Dec 1941 
Commissioned10 Jul 1942 
End service 
History

HMS Shakespeare (Lt. David Swanston, DSC, RN) was damaged by gunfire and aircraft bombs in the Nankauri Strait, Andaman Islands 3 January 1945 and written off as a constructive total loss. Sold to be broken up for scrap 14 July 1946.

 
Former nameP 71

Commands listed for HMS Shakespeare (P 221)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Lt. Michael Frederic Roberts Ainslie, DSC, RN10 Apr 19421 Mar 1944
2Lt. William Evan Ironside Littlejohn, DSC, RANVR1 Mar 19446 Mar 1944
3Lt. David Swanston, DSC, RN6 Mar 1944???

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Noteable events involving Shakespeare include:


The page for this submarine is currently (November 2013 and onwards) being updated.

8 Jul 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed her builders yard at Barrow for Holy Loch. She was escorted by HMS La Capricieuse (Lt.Cdr. G.W. Dobson, RNR). (1)

9 Jul 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) arrived at Holy Loch to begin a period of trials and training. (1)

13 Aug 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Holy Loch for Lerwick. She was escorted by HMS White Bear (Cdr. (retired) C.C. Flemming, RN). (1)

15 Aug 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) arrived at Lerwick. She departed for her 1st war patrol later the same day. She was ordered to perform an A/S patrol in the Norwegian Sea. (2)

26 Aug 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) ended her 1st war patrol at Lerwick. (2)

7 Sep 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Lerwick for her 2nd war patrol. She was ordered to provide cover for convoy operations to and from Northern Russia. (2)

23 Sep 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) ended her 2nd war patrol at Lerwick. (2)

24 Sep 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Lerwick for Holy Loch. She made the passage together with HMS P 217 (Lt. E.J.D. Turner, DSC, RN), HMS Unique (Lt. R.E. Boddington, RN) and HMS P 45 (Lt. H.B. Turner, RN). They were escorted by HMS White Bear (Cdr. (retired) C.C. Flemming, RN). (1)

26 Sep 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) arrived at Holy Loch. (1)

11 Oct 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Holy Loch for passage to Gibraltar. The passage South through the Irish Sea was made together with HMS P 45 (Lt. H.B. Turner, RN) and HMS P 511 (Lt. C.R. Pelly, RN). They were escorted by HMS Northern Pride (T/Lt. A.L.F. Bell, RNR). (2)

21 Oct 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) arrived at Gibraltar. (2)

1 Nov 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Gibraltar for her 3rd war patrol (1st in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol off Algiers to aid in Operation Torch, the Allied landings in North Africa. (2)

4 Nov 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) performs a periscope reconnaissance of the landing beaches off Algiers. After dark a folbot was launched to do further reconnaissance. Due to the worsening weather situation the folbot crew could not be picked up and they were captured by a Vichy-French trawler. (2)

5 Nov 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) performs a periscope reconnaissance of the landing beaches off Algiers. After dark she returned to the folbot rendez-vous position to wait the return of the folbot crew launched the night before. The crew had been captured by the Vichy-French but this was off course not known on board P 221. (2)

6 Nov 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) again performs a periscope reconnaissance of the landing beaches off Algiers. After dark she returned to the folbot rendez-vous position to wait the return of the folbot crew launched two nights before. The crew had been captured by the Vichy-French but this was off course not known on board P 221. (2)

7 Nov 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) made a final periscope reconnaissance of the landing beaches off Algiers. After dark a folbot was launched to mark 'Apple White beach'. This was a rather small beach not so easy to find. The folbot to mark 'Appel Green beach' was not launched as this beach rather easy to find. At 2135 hours P 221 was in her beacon position and began flashing to seaward as well as transmitting on R.D.F. One hour later the landing convoy came in sight. (2)

8 Nov 1942
With her task off Algiers completed HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) is ordered to patrol off Marittimo Island to the West of Sicily. (2)

11 Nov 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) is ordered to patrol off Cape Bon. (2)

12 Nov 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) is ordered to patrol off Cani Rocks. (2)

16 Nov 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) attacked an enemy convoy and missed the German merchant Menes (5609 GRT, built 1926). Two hits were claimed but this was not the case.

(All times are zone -1)
0818 hours - Heard faint HE bearing 120°. Came to periscope depth but sighted nothing.

0840 hours - Sighted the upper works of one medium seized merchant vessel and the masts of a destroyer bearing 180°. Range was about 6 nautical miles. Could not close enough to attack.

0922 hours - Heard HE bearing 030°. On coming to periscope depth sighted a 5000 tons merchant vessel and one Dardo-class destroyer and 2 Cant 506 aircraft. Started attack. The destroyer was 1000 yards ahead of the destroyer.

0942 hours - Fired 4 torpedoes. Two hits were observed.

0951 hours - Depth charging commenced. Only 2 of the depth charges that were dropped were close.

1040 hours - Saw 2 Cant 506 aircraft circling in the position of the attack. Could see nothing else but visibility was rather bad due to a rainsquall. (2)

25 Nov 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) ended her 3rd war patrol (1st in the Mediterranean) at Gibraltar.

She returned with defects to the main motors. These could not be repaired at Gibraltar and it was decided to sent her back to the U.K. (2)

7 Dec 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Gibraltar for Porstmouth. She was to return to the U.K. for repairs to her main motors. (2)

16 Dec 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) arrived at Falmouth. (2)

17 Dec 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Falmouth for Portsmouth. She made the passage together with HMS Thrasher (Lt. H.S. Mackenzie, DSO, RN). They were escorted by HMS Unst (T/Lt. J.R. Smith, RNR). (2)

18 Dec 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) arrived at Portsmouth. (2)

19 Dec 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Portsmouth for Sheerness. She made the passage together with HMS Thrasher (Lt. H.S. Mackenzie, DSO, RN). They were escorted by HMS Kingston Topaz (Skr. S.C. Larner, RNR). (1)

20 Dec 1942
HMS P 221 (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) arrived at Sheerness. She then went to the Chatham dockyard for repairs to her main motors. (1)

3 Mar 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) competed refit and repairs to her main motors at Chatham dockyard. (3)

5 Mar 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) shifted from Chatham dockyard to Sheerness. (3)

6 Mar 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Sheerness for Portsmouth. She was escorted by HMS ML 464. Later escort duties were taken over by HMS ML 535. (3)

7 Mar 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) arrived at Portsmouth. (3)

8 Mar 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) conducted exercises off Portsmouth. (3)

11 Mar 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Portsmouth for Gibraltar. She was escorted towards Bishops Rock by HMS Asie (Skr. E.A. Mutten, RNR).

While en-route Shakespeare was ordered to several patrol positions to intercept an expected German blockade runner due to arrive in France, making this her 4th war patrol. (2)

15 Mar 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) is ordered to patrol in position 44°57'N, 13°50'W. (2)

16 Mar 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) is ordered to patrol in position 44°57'N, 10°01'W. (2)

17 Mar 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) is ordered to remain on the surface to increase the chance of sighting the blockade runner. Later she was ordered to proceed with despath 60 nautical miles to the East. In the evening she was ordered to return to her initial patrol position as it had become clear that she was unable to intercept the expected blockade runner. (2)

18 Mar 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) is ordered to continue her passage to Gibraltar. (2)

24 Mar 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) ended her 4th war patrol at Gibraltar. (2)

28 Mar 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Gibraltar for Algiers. (3)

1 Apr 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) arrived at Algiers. (4)

9 Apr 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Algiers for her 5th war patrol (2nd in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol off South-East Sardinia. (2)

13 Apr 1943
At 0142 hours (zone -1), in position 38°39'N, 09°26'E HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) was bombed by an enemy aircraft. Upon sighting the aircraft Shakespeare dived. When she was at 40 feet something hit the after casing with a loud crack. This was thought to be a bomb but fortunately it did not explode. (2)

26 Apr 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) ended her 5th war patrol (2nd in the Mediterranean) at Algiers. (2)

8 May 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Algiers for her 6th war patrol (3rd in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol off Corsica. (2)

13 May 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) sank the Italian sailing vessels Sant' Anna M. (156 GRT) and Adelina (80 GRT) with gunfire to the East of the Strait of Bonifacio in position 41°20'N, 10°16'E.

(All times are zone -1)
1708 hours - Sighted the mast of 2 schooners to the Westward. When about to surface after having closed submerged as much as possible when an aircraft appeared near the schooners. She then carried out an A/S patrol preventing Shakespeare from surfacing and engaging the schooners.

1907 hours - Surfaced after the aircraft had left the area. The schooners were now just visible hull down to the North-East. Proceeded to chase them.

2011 hours - Opened fire from 1000 yards. Fired 52 rounds and obtained at least 20 hits on each vessel.

2045 hours - Left the area. One schooner had sunk and the other was settling fast. (2)

20 May 1943
At 1320 hours (zone -1) HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) surfaced to bombard aircraft hangars near Calvi, Corsica, France. 20 Rounds were fired. After 5 minutes shore batteries opened fire on HMS Shakespeare so the action was broken off and Shakespeare dived and retired from the scene. (2)

24 May 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) ended her 6th war patrol (3rd in the Mediterranean) at Algiers. (2)

5 Jun 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Algiers for her 7th war patrol (4th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol off Toulon, Southern France. (2)

19 Jun 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) is mistakenly bombed by Allied aircraft in position 37°30'N, 03°48'E. This was very unfortunate as Shakespeare had just sighted an enemy U-boat and was about to attack it. This U-boat was most likely the German U-73.

At 0409 hours however the Officer Of the Watch reported an aircraft attacking from the Starboard beam. The aircraft fired rockets but these fortunately Shakespeare was not hit. The attack on the U-boat was now off course out of the question.

Later the same day HMS Shakespeare ended her 7th war patrol (4th in the Mediterranean) at Algiers. (2)

23 Jun 1943
During 23 and 24 June 1943 HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) conducted exercises off Algiers. In these exercises Shakespeare was to act as a beacon. (5)

1 Jul 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Algiers for her 8th war patrol (5th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to aid in the Allied Landings on Sicily. She was to act as a beacon during the landings off Gela. (2)

7 Jul 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) arrived off Gela, Sicily, Italy to reconnoitre the landing beaches. (2)

8 Jul 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) conducted furter reconnaissance off Gela, Sicily, Italy. She also laid a buoy in her beacon position. (2)

9 Jul 1943
In the evening HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) was in her beacon position and succesfully contacted her escort, the US destroyer USS Cole at 2215 hours. Around 0100/10 the beacon duties were completed and HMS Shakespeare set course for Malta escorted by USS Cole. (2)

10 Jul 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) ended her 8th war patrol (5th in the Mediterranean) at Malta. (2)

22 Jul 1943
During the night of 22 and 23 July 1943 HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) conducted exercises off Malta. These exercises included the launching and recovery of folbots. (6)

25 Jul 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Malta for her 9th war patrol (6th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to perform a special operation (details hopefully to follow). (2)

6 Aug 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) fires three torpedoes at what is identified as an Italian light cruiser to the North-West of Ustica. All torpedoed missed their target.

(All times are zone -1)
0303 hours - In position 39°01'N, 12°40'E a darkened object was sighted abaft the Starboard beam. The Officer Of the Watch quite rightly turned stern on until the object had been identified.

0305 hours - Identified the object as an Italian light cruiser of the Condoterri-class. Started attack but Shakespeare was not in a favourable attack position at a rather long range.

0310 hours - Fired three torpedoes from 6000 yards. No hits were obtained as the speed was under-estimated. (2)

9 Aug 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) ended her 9th war patrol (6th in the Mediterranean) at Algiers. (2)

24 Aug 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Algiers for her 10th war patrol (7th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to aid in the Allied Landings on the Italian Mainland at Salerno. As before she was to act as a beacon during these landings. (2)

30 Aug 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) entered the Gulf of Salerno to search for mines with the M.D.U. (Mine Detector Unit). She succesfully located a minefield.

Later on the day she conducted a periscope reconnaissance.

During the night a folbot was launched for beach reconnaissance. The folbot party succesfully returned after almost 7 hours. (2)

31 Aug 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) conducted a periscope reconnaissance of beaches in the Bay of Salerno. During the night a folbot was launched for beach reconnaissance. The folbot party succesfully returned after 6 hours. (2)

2 Sep 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) had now left Salerno Bay and sent a report of her reconnaissance. She then set course to patrol the North-Western approaches to the Gulf of Naples. (2)

5 Sep 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) patrolled to the South West of Isola di Capri. (2)

6 Sep 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) returned to the vicinity of Salerno Bay. (2)

7 Sep 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) torpedoed and sank the Italian submarine Velella (offsite link) about 18 nautical miles east of Licosa Island, south of Salerno, Italy in position 40°15'N, 14°30'E. There were no survivors.

(All times are zone -2)
1953 hours - The Asdic operator reported HE. It was nearly dark. Sighed two submarines steering a course of 135°. They were about 1 nautical mile apart. Started attacking the one who would be against the remaining light in the Western sky the longest. The other was soon lost against the land.

2003 hours - Fired a full salvo of 6 torpedoes from what was thought to be 1200 yards but was more like 800 yards in hindsight. No less then 4 hits were observed and the enemy submarine disintegrated. The other submarine was heard to continue its passage Southbound but at a higher speed.

2015 hours - Another submarine was heard going South but it was never sighted.

2114 hours - Surfaced to withdraw from the scene to report the 2 Southbound submarines. (2)

8 Sep 1943
In the afternoon HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) was bottomed in her beacon position. At 2135 hours she surfaced and succesfully contacted her escort, the US destroyer USS Cole and commenced her beacon duties. Around 0030/09 the beacon duties were completed and HMS Shakespeare set course for Algiers escorted by USS Cole until 12°00'E (2)

12 Sep 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) ended her 10th war patrol (7th in the Mediterranean) at Algiers. (2)

26 Sep 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) is docked at Algiers. (7)

29 Sep 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) is undocked. (7)

10 Oct 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Algiers for Beirut together with HMS Seraph (Lt. N.L.A. Jewell, OBE, RN). They made part of the passage in convoy KMS 28. (8)

18 Oct 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) arrived at Beirut where she joined the 1st Submarine Flotilla. (8)

21 Oct 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Beirut for her 11th war patrol (8th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol in the Aegean. (2)

26 Oct 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSO, DSC, RN) sank the Greek sailing vessel SYR 404 / Aghios Konstantinos (22 GRT) in position 38°06'N, 25°22'E.

(All times are zone -3)
1720 hours - Sighted a large two-masted caique bound for Khios. Decided to remain dived in the hope of bigger prey. If nothing came we could then surface and chase the caique.

1940 hours - Surfaced and proceeded to intercept the caique.

2055 hours - Sank the caique with gunfire. (2)

12 Nov 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) ended her 11th war patrol (8th in the Mediterranean) at Beirut. (2)

26 Nov 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) departed Beirut for her 12th war patrol (9th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol in the Aegean. Upon completion of this patrol she was to proceed to Malta as Shakespeare had to return to the U.K. for a refit. (2)

3 Dec 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSO, DSC, RN) sank the Greek sailing vessel Eleftheria with gunfire off Kos, Greece.

(All times are zone -3)
1145 hours - Sighted a two-masted Southbound caique of about 100 tons. She was fully laden.

1249 hours - Surfaced and engaged with the 3" gun and the Oerlikon.

1254 hours - Dived as shore batteries on Kos had opened fire. The targt had been hit several times.

1259 hours - The target was seen to sink. The crew had abandoned ship in a small boat and were seen rowing to the Turkish coast which was the nearest. (2)

11 Dec 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) ended her 12th war patrol (9th in the Mediterranean) at Malta. (2)

12 Dec 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSO, DSC, RN) departed Malta for Gibraltar, passage was made in convoy GUS 24. (8)

17 Dec 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSO, DSC, RN) arrived at Gibraltar. (8)

28 Dec 1943
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSO, DSC, RN) departed Gibraltar for Plymouth. (8)

4 Jan 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSO, DSC, RN) arrived at Plymouth where she was to refit at the Devonport Dockyard. (8)

1 Jun 1944
With her refit at the Devonport Dockyard completed HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Plymouth for the Clyde. She made the passage together with HMS Unruffled (Lt. F. Park, RN). They were escorted by HMS White Bear (Cdr. C.W. Sabine, OBE, RN). (9)

3 Jun 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Holy Loch to begin a period of trials and training. (9)

30 Jun 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Holy Loch for Scapa Flow. She made the passage North together with HMS Voracious (Lt. F.D.G. Challis, DSC, RN). They were escorted by HMS Shikari (Lt. E.H.U. Cautley, RNVR). (9)

2 Jul 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Scapa Flow where she was to participate in A/S exercises. (10)

3 Jul 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) conducted A/S exercises with HMS Marne (Lt.Cdr. P.A.R. Withers, DSO, RN) and HMS Swiftsure (Capt. R.D. Oliver, CBE, DSC, RN). (10)

6 Jul 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) conducted A/S exercises with HMS Mermaid (Lt.Cdr. J.P. Mosse, RN), HMS Hamlet (T/Lt. J.C. Boyd, RNVR) and HMS Graemsay (A/Skr.Lt. A.R. Lewis, RNR). (10)

7 Jul 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) conducted A/S exercises with HMS Bellona (Capt. C.F.W. Norris, RN). (10)

11 Jul 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) conducted A/S exercises with HMS Matchless (Lt.Cdr. E.N. Walmsley, DSC, RN) and HMS Musketeer (Cdr. R.L. Fisher, OBE, DSC, RN). (10)

12 Jul 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) conducted A/S exercises with HMS Peacock (Lt.Cdr. R.B. Stannard, VC, DSO, RD, RNR). (10)

15 Jul 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) conducted A/S exercises with HMS Myngs (Capt. M.L. Power, CBE, RN). (10)

16 Jul 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Scapa Flow for Holy Loch. She made the passage South together with HMS Voracious (Lt. F.D.G. Challis, DSC, RN). They were escorted by HMS Sardonyx (A/Lt.Cdr. T.A. Easton, RNVR). (10)

18 Jul 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Holy Loch to continue her working up programme. (10)

8 Aug 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) is docked at Holy Loch. (11)

9 Aug 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) is undocked. (11)

17 Aug 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Holy Loch for her 13th war patrol. She was ordered to perform an Anti-Uboat patrol to the East of the Shetlands. She was escorted North through the Minches by HMS Shikari (Lt. E.H.U. Cautley, RNVR). (2)

19 Aug 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) put into Scapa Flow for repairs to her W/T equipment. (2)

26 Aug 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) aided in A/S exercises at Scapa Flow. She also conducted attack exercises with HMS Selene (Lt.Cdr. H.R.B. Newton, DSC, RN). (2)

27 Aug 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Scapa Flow to resume her 13th war patrol. (2)

7 Sep 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) ended her 13th war patrol at Lerwick.

In the evening she departed Lerwick for passage to Scapa Flow. The next morning she made rendez-vous with HMS HMS Varne (Lt. I.G. Raikes, DSC, RN), HMS Uproar (Lt. J.N. Devlin, DSC, RN), HMS Unshaken (Lt. J.S. Pearce, RNR) and their escort HMS Cutty Sark. (2)

9 Sep 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Holy Loch. (12)

12 Sep 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) is docked at Holy Loch. (12)

14 Sep 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) is undocked. (12)

3 Oct 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Holy Loch for Gibraltar. This was the first leg of the trip to the Far East.

Passage to Gibraltar was made in convoy KMS 65 together with the French submarine Doris. (13)

11 Oct 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Gibraltar. (13)

16 Oct 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) conducted exercises off Gibraltar. (13)

17 Oct 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) conducted exercises off Gibraltar. (13)

18 Oct 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) depaerted Gibraltar for Malta. She made the passage in a convoy but the ships log does not state which convoy. (13)

23 Oct 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Malta. (13)

30 Oct 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Malta for Port Said. (13)

3 Nov 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Port Said. (14)

4 Nov 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) transited the Suez Canal Southbound. (14)

5 Nov 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Suez for Aden. (14)

10 Nov 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Aden. (14)

13 Nov 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Aden for Trincomalee. Before leaving A/S exercises were carried out with HMS Plym (T/A/Lt.Cdr. A. Foxall, RNR) and HMS Genista (Lt. T.G. Radford, RNR). (14)

24 Nov 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Trincomalee. (14)

18 Dec 1944
During 18 and 19 December 1944 HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) conducted exercises off Trincomalee. These included night exercises. (15)

20 Dec 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Trincomalee for her 14th war patrol (1st in the Far East). She was ordered to patrol off the Andaman Islands. (2)

31 Dec 1944
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) torpedoed and sank the Japanese merchant cargo ship Unryu Maru (2515 GRT, built 1935) east of Port Blair, Andaman Islands in position 11°40'N, 93°15'E. The Unryu Maru was in convoy together with the Teshio Maru (362 GRT ,built 1930). They were escorted by the submarine chasers Ch-34, Ch-35 and Ch-63 (all offsite links).

(All times are zone -6.5)
0840 hours - In position 11°47'N, 93°13'E sighted a convoy leaving Nankauri Strait. The convoy was seen to consist of 2 merchant ships and 3 escorts. Started attack on the leading and largest merchant ship.

0912 hours - Fired 6 torpedoes from 1500 yards. Went deep on firing the last torpedo and took avoiding action. Five explosions were heard.

0921 hours - The first 2 depth charges were dropped but these were not very close.

1005 - 1114 hours - A further 9 depth charges were dropped but none were close. Escorts and aircraft remained in the area throughout the day dropping occasional depth charges. (2)

3 Jan 1945
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) attacked a small Japanese merchant ship with 4 torpedoes in position 11°51'N, 93°12'E. No hits were obtained.

Shakespeare then surfaced for gun action. What happened on this day can best be discriped by giving here the full text of the patrol report as written by Lt. Swanston from 3 January 1945 to 8 January 1945.

(All times are zone -6.5)
0515 hours – Dived 10 nautical miles East of Nankauri Strait.

0715 hours – Sighted the mast and funnel of a Southbound merchant ship of about 700 tons. Closed to attack but could not get nearer then 3500 yards. Nothing else was in sight.

0750 hours – Fired 4 torpedoes from 3500 yards. No hits were obtained. The ship was and remained on a steady course. Enemy speed was 7 knots.

0758 hours – Surfaced for gun action. Closed at high speed on main engines and opened fire at a range of 5000 yards. After the 4th round the ship turned directly towards and opened a very inaccurate fire with a gun thought to be a 12pdr. Altered course 20 degrees to port and also opened fire with the Oerlikon. Unfortunately it jammed after the first burst.

0805 hours – 15 Rounds had now been fired for 1 hit and possibly 2 waterline hits. Sighted what was thought tob e a submarine chaser coming through Nankauri Strait. Range was 9000 yards. Turned away and cleared the bridge and gun platforms prepatory to diving. By this time the range of the merchant ship was down to 1500 yards and it obtained a direct hit on our pressure hull just forward of the engine room bulkhead door outside the W/T office. This hole although just above the waterline with the submarine stopped was awash wheen under way. A considerable quantity of water poured in, eventually filling up the auxiliary machinery space and partially flooding the control room and engine room. The ballast pump was immediately started and efforts made to stop the inflow of water through the hole. These efferts were however ineffective and very soon the ballast pump was flooded and ceased to work. Brown’s system in the steering was holed and after a short period out of control, steering was resumed from aft following control room Evershead. By this time the auxiliary machine space had been lef tand shut down. The battery ventilation and engine outboard induction trunking, exterior to the pressure hull had both been riddled with splinter holes. This meant that the engine room door had to be kept open and that water flooded into the engine room. By this time the W/T transmitting panel and the gyro compass had been flooded. The submarine was unable to dive in this condition. The 3” gun, the Oerlikon and the Vickers guns were therefore manned again. During the action that followed the P.O. Tel. And the Ldg. Tel., on their own initiative, went on the bridge and down on to the saddle tanks and began to plug the hole from the outside with a blanket. While they were doing this the merchant ship obtained 4 more hits. The blast from one of these blew off the P.O. Tel’s boots and burned both feet. He continued plugging the hole.

Fire was re-opened with the 3” and Vickers guns. A clearing charge failed to clear the jammed round in the Oerlikon. The range was now about 1000 yards, which was maintained as Shakespeare steered away from the merchant ship. The gunlayer and trainer of the 3” gun had both been wounded. Their places were taken by the First Lieutenant and Telegraphist Britton. The stern torpedo was then fired at the merchant vessel to discourage him. It missed.

0820 hours – Obtained a hit on the enemy’s gun which was now out of action. He then turned away with a noticeable list to port. The submarine chaser meanwhile had closed to 6000 yards and opened fire. Course and speed was maintained and Shakespeare got away from him as he, fortunately, went to the aid of the merchant ship. The Vickers guns were then reloaded and the spare Oerlikon barrel was fitted in lieu of the jammed one. A chain of buckets was also organised from the control room to the bridge and gun tower. This was the only means to get rid of the water. Course was now set to the 10 Degree Channel. Now we had to wait for the air attacks to start. The merchant and submarine chaser meanwhile set course towards Port Blair.

0900 hours – The port engine seized. Shortly afterwards the P.O. Tel., who was still working on the saddle tanks plugging the hole, fel loverboard. Stopped and manouvred on the main motors to pick him up. Course was then resumed on one engine only at a speed of 7 knots. The P.O. Tel. and Ldg. Tel. then joined the bucket chain. After about one hour the P.O. Tel came to the bridge and performed duties as air-lookout until dark, and, although wounded on both feet and the left arm, also took occasional burst with a tommy-gun on very close aircraft.

0930 hours – A seaplane was sighted over Nankauri Strait come towards and started a low level dive bombing attack from astern. When the range had closed sufficiently he was given a short burst from a Vickers gun manned by the second Coxwain. This caused hi mto release his bomb 20 yards away on the port side, set him on fire. He was seen to crash into the sea 1000 yards on the starboard bow. This had a most heartening effect on the whole ships company. The bomb was a small one and caused no damage.

1000 hours – 2 Jake aircraft appeared. They each carried out a dummy low level attack and then came in an bombed us. Each machine carried 2 small bombs and 1 was dropped extremely close. The splash flooded the bridge and bust an H.P. air line inside the submarine in the bilges. The escaping air caused the bilge water to ‘fountain’ and the ratings in the compartment thought we had been holed again. The spare Oerlikon now also jammed, again due to defective ammunition but it could be cleared with a clearing charge.

In the second attack the bombs fell some distance away. Up to 1420 hours, 5 more bombing attacks by Jake aircraft, each carrying 2 50lb. bombs, were made. These aircraft were all kept at a respectful distance by Vickers and Oerlikon fire. Their bombs all fell wide and caused no damage. One aircraft was hit with the Oerlikon. When the Jake aircraft flew overhead, upon completion of their bombing runs, they sprayed Shakespeare with their machine gun.

1420 hours – Sighted an unidentified escort vessel closing from the starboard quarter. On sighting this all decyphered signals and patrol orders were burt. All code books were sacked up, ready for ditching. The remaining 2 torpedoes were also brought to the ready. But the escort vessel did not close any further and possibly went to pick up the pilot from the downed plane leaving us to the mercy of the Japanese air force. A bomber and 2 fighter-bombers now appeared. One of the fighter bombers attacked first. He dropped 2 bombs and made an ineffective machine gun attack. The bomber then came in at a hight of 300 feet. It dropped 2 1000lb bombs which near missed us. The splinters wounded 2 ratings on the gun platform. The second fighter bomber then came in, released his bombs, turned round and made a low level diving cannon firing attack from aft, which raked the bridge. One Vickers gunner was mortally wounded and superficial damage was caused. This aircraft was hit by at least 2 of the Vickers guns. He then retired.

From 1600 hours until just before sunset single attacks by groups of 4 aircraft, fighter bombers with machine guns, occured at half-hourly intervals. All however kept at a respectful distance. The Oerlikon finally jammed during these attacks, again due to defective ammunition, and could not be cleared. The 3” gun was used throughout the day, about 200 rounds had been fired. Several shells burst close to aircraft and made them turn away.

Half-an-hour before sunset a bomber, 2 fighter bombers and a seaplane appeared. The fighter bombers carried out dive bombings attacks from the sun, dropping 2 bombs each. When not attacking they were circling in and out of the clouds and it was difficult to tell which aircraft would attack next. The bomber pressed home his attack from a height of 300 feet. 2 Heavy bombs landed close to the port quarter and he fired his rear gun as he passed overhead. He was most likely hit by fire from the Vickers guns. Just after sunset, at 1830 hours, this performance was repeated by the fighter bombers only but they kept a respectful distance and their bombs fell wide. With the darkness the air attacks ceased and it was possible to take stock of the situation inside the submarine, which was as follows
Port engine out of action, starboard engine in fair shape.
Auxiliary oil and water pump out of action due to flooding.
Main motors out of action due to flooding.
W/T and gyro compass out of action due to flooding.
Submarine being steered by Evershead from the control room using the telemotor aft.
Hole 9” by 4” in the pressure hull.
Hole in the gun tower.
Diving compass out of action.
Hole in no.2 port main ballast tank.
4” depth of water in the control room. Battery boards tight.
Starboard side H.P. ring main severed outside W/T office.
L.P. blower line slightly damaged.
Ballast pump out of action.
Upper conning tower hatch could not bes hut.

Casualties to the crew were as below.
T.A. Motherham, (A.B., C/JX.300991)
Mortally wounded in the left thigh – half shattering his leg – caused by cannon shell while firing at enemy aircraft.

G. Taylor, (A.B., C/JX. 394962)
Mortally wounded in left temple – caused by splinter wounds while in bucket chain by the gun tower.

Lieutenant Pearson, RNVR
Wound from splinter in the right foot while controlling 3” gunfire at the enemy merchant vessel

Sub/Lieutenant Morgan, RNVR
Slight splinter wound from cannon shell during air attacks. He was next to A.B. Motherham when this rating was mortially wounded.

J. Wild (A.B., C/JX. 208609)
Bomb splinter wound in shoulder, back, head, one leg and both arms while supplying ammunition during air attacks.

R.F. Whitelam (A.B., C/JX. 352155)
Shell splinter wounds in arm, groin, thigh and leg, while training 3” gun against the merhant vessel.

F. Foster (A.B., P/JX. 141086)
Shell splinter wounds in one leg and both arms while laying 3” gun against the merchant vessel.

V.G. Harmer (P.O. Tel., P/JX. 141086)
Splinter wound in left shoulder, feet burned, while stemming flow of water in hole in pressure hull under fire.

H. Jones (Ldg. Sig. P/SSX. 27809)
Small splinter wound in chest while carrying out the duties of action lookout.

H. Hayes (A.B., D/JX. 257838)
Shell splinter wound in hip and upper leg while manning 3” gun during action against the merchant vessel.

D.K. Roy (A.B., P/JX. 275912)
Burn in stomach from ejected shell case during gun action.

B. Fellows (A.B., P/JX. 415075)
Two fingers lacerated adjusting magazine of Vickers gun.

J. Jockley (S.P.O., P/KX. 98747)
Over all poisoning from cuts in fee tand hands during action repair duties.

R. Evans (Stoker, P/KX. 523699)
Poisoning of foot following a cut while on action repair duties.

F. Capper (Stoker, D/KX. 154381)
Poisoning of foot following small cuts obtained during action repair work.

The ships company was then organised for the night, a chain of buckets still being necessary to deal with water coming in through the damaged pressure hull. Course was set to pass through the 10 Degree Channel to get as far away from land as possible by dawn.

For the continuation of events see 4 January 1945. (2)

4 Jan 1945
HMS Shakespeare continuation of the events of 3 January 1945

(All times are zone -6.5)
During the night, A.B. Motherham died of wounds. He was buried at sea the following day.

The port circulator had been rigged as a bilge pump. A hammock was rigged as a chute so that the water from the hole ran into the engine room bilges. Attempts were made to repair the port engine but this could not be done.

At dawn the Vickers guns were stripped and cleaned and an attempt was made to clear the Oerlikon imn prepartation for another day of air attacks. Nothing however happened to everyone’s surprise and relief. The second coxwain went over the side and improved the blanket plugging which considerably reduced the inflow of water.

Lt. Swanston then remembered that HMS Stygian was outward bound from Trincomalee to her patrol area. Course was then set to place Shakespeare on the route of HMS Stygian.

For the continuation of events see 5 January 1945. (2)

5 Jan 1945
HMS Shakespeare continuation of the events of 4 January 1945

(All times are zone -6.5)
0900 hours – It was decided to put an external patch over the hole in the pressure hull in case the weather should deteriorate. This was finished at 1400 hours. During the fitting of this patch speed had tob e reduced to 5 knots and the submarine had to be heeled 7 degrees to port. While this work was going on the starboard muffler tank was found to be damaged. The supply to the muffler tank spray was cut out with a chisel thus increasing the flow of circulating water. This enabled speed tob e increased to 8.5 knots one the fitting of the patch over the hole was completed. A spare pump was also rigged to remove water from the bilges in case the other pump should fail.

The first hot meal since 2 January was served which revived all hand considerably. Also the bucket chain was no longer needed. The small bullit hole in no.2 ballast tank was plugged by the second coxwain.

2100 hours – As we expected to come across HMS Stygian around midnight it was decided to fire recognition grenades every hou rand Very’s lights of the same colour ever half hour (to conserve grenades) and star shell every 2 hours throughout the night or until HMS Stygian challenged.

For the continuation of events see 6 January 1945. (2)

6 Jan 1945
HMS Shakespeare continuation of the events of 5 January 1945

(All times are zone -6.5)
0100 hours – Sighted light to the Westward. Shortly afterwards, in position 08°37’N, 87°00’W exchanged pendants with HMS Stygian (Lt. G.S.C. Clarabut, DSO, RN). Lt. Clarabut suspected a trap asked for the Christian names of Lt. Swanston’s wife as both Commanding Officers were personal friends. The necessary reply was given, together with the Christian names of Lt Clarabut’s wife for good measure. Details of damage, casualties, etc. were then passed for transmission.

0200 hours – Set course for Trincomalee together with HMS Stygian.

0730 hours – Reduced speed to 5 knots and half-masted colours (as did Stygian)during the burial of A.B. Taylor who had died of his wounds during the previous evening.

0900 hours – Both submarines stopped and Stygian sent over a working party of 6 men as well as torches, medical supplies and bread by folbot. They also informed us the the destroyer HMS Raider would be meeting us at about 1500 hours.

1500 hours – HMS Raider (Lt.Cdr. J.C. Cartwright, DSC, RN) arrived. All wounded and injured were transferred to her. Oldham lights, torches, bread and chocolate as well as a working party of 10 men were sent back to Shakespeare by the destroyer. The working party of HMS Stygian was sent back to her and she then continued to her patrol area. HMS Shakespeare and HMS Raider then continued the passage to Trincomalee. Now the crew of HMS Shakespeare could get some hours of well earned sleep.

For the continuation of events see 7 January 1945. (2)

7 Jan 1945
HMS Shakespeare continuation of the events of 6 January 1945

(All times are zone -6.5)
1000 hours – Water was now so low in the engine room and motor room bilges that the starboard shaft, which had been cooled by it, now fired up at bulkhead gland, and the starboard engine had to be stopped. A tow was passed with some difficulty.

1030 hours – Commenced towing. HMS Raider working up to 15 knots in an endeavour to get to Trincomalee before nightfall.

1200 hours – The tow parted. The wire was then passed again. During this operation the stern of HMS Raider landed on HMS Shakespeare’s bow causing a neat cut in Raider’s side. There was no damage to Shakespeare.

1300 hours – Towing commenced again but now at a speed of 10 knots.

1630 hours – HMS Whelp (Cdr. G.A.F. Norfolk, RN) arrived to take over the duties from HMS Raider who then slpped her tow. HMS Whelp passed a towline. During this operation HMS Whelp was also holed. The working party of HMS Raider was returned to her and a working party of HMS Whelp was taken on board.

1730 hours – In tow again, speed 10 knots.

1800 hours – The tow parted. Wire had to be passed again.

1930 hours – Towing commenced again.

For the continuation of events see 8 January 1945. (2)

8 Jan 1945
HMS Shakespeare continuation of the events of 7 January 1945

(All times are zone -6.5)
0500 hours – Passed Foul Point and sipped tow and secured alongside a tug.

0800 hours – Passed the boom and secured alongside our depot ship HMS Wolfe. (2)

9 Feb 1945
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) conducted engine trials off Trincomalee. (16)

10 Feb 1945
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Trincomalee for Colombo. She was towed by the corvette HMS Rockrose (T/Lt. H.J. Makepeace, RNR). (16)

12 Feb 1945
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Colombo for repairs.

After some delay a conference was held and it became clear that nothing could be done there to the pressure hull and very little on the remainder, for a considerable time. It was decided to limit the work to get both engines and one motor fit for passage to the U.K. (16)

26 Apr 1945
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) conducted engine trials off Colombo. (17)

3 May 1945
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Colombo for Trincomalee. At Trincomalee she was to dock as this was not possible at Colombo. Also her air-conditioning would be removed. (18)

6 May 1945
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Trincomalee. (18)

21 May 1945
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) is undocked. (18)

23 May 1945
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Trincomalee for the U.K. The first leg of the trip was to Suez.

She made the complete passage to the U.K. together with HMS Strongbow (Lt. J.A.R. Troup, DSC, RN). (18)

6 Jun 1945
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Suez. (19)

7 Jun 1945
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) transited the Suez Canal Northbound and arrived at Port Said. (19)

13 Jun 1945
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Port Said for Malta. (19)

17 Jun 1945
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Malta. (19)

17 Jun 1945
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Malta for Gibraltar. (19)

23 Jun 1945
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Gibraltar. (19)

24 Jun 1945
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Gibraltar for Portsmouth. (19)

30 Jun 1945
HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Portsmouth.

The Admiralty decided that HMS Shakespeare would not be repaired/refitted. (19)

Sources

  1. ADM 199/424
  2. ADM 199/1872
  3. ADM 173/18054
  4. ADM 173/18055
  5. ADM 173/18057
  6. ADM 173/18058
  7. ADM 199/1919
  8. ADM 199/2570
  9. ADM 173/18718
  10. ADM 173/18719
  11. ADM 173/18720
  12. ADM 173/18721
  13. ADM 173/18722
  14. ADM 173/18723
  15. ADM 173/18724
  16. ADM 173/19638
  17. ADM 173/19640
  18. ADM 173/19641
  19. ADM 173/19642

ADM numbers indicate documents at the British National Archives at Kew, London.


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