Allied Warships

HMS Tetrarch (N 77)

Submarine of the T class

NavyThe Royal Navy
TypeSubmarine
ClassT 
PennantN 77 
Built byVickers Armstrong (Barrow-in-Furness, U.K.) 
Ordered6 May 1938 
Laid down24 Aug 1938 
Launched14 Nov 1939 
Commissioned15 Feb 1940 
Lost2 Nov 1941 
History

HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. George Henry Greenway, RN) sailed from Malta on 26 October 1941 for a refit in the U.S.A., via Gibraltar and the U.K. She failed to arrive in Gibraltar on 2nd November and was declared overdue. She is presumed lost on Italian mines off Capo Granditola, Sicily, Italy in late October 1941.

 

Commands listed for HMS Tetrarch (N 77)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Lt.Cdr. Ronald George Mills, RN30 Nov 193915 Nov 1940
2Lt.Cdr. Richard Micaiah Towgood Peacock, RN15 Nov 19403 Jul 1941
3Lt.Cdr. George Henry Greenway, RN3 Jul 1941< 2 Nov 41

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Noteable events involving Tetrarch include:


The history of HMS Traveller as compiled on this page is extracted from Troopers patrol reports and logbooks. Corrections and details regarding information from the enemy's side (for instance the composition of convoys attacked) is kindly provided by Mr. Platon Alexiades, a naval researcher from Canada.

24 Jan 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) departed her builders yard for Greenock for trials. She arrived at Greenock later the same day.

29 Jan 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) returns to her builders yard at Barrow.

15 Feb 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) departed her builders yard at Barrow for Greenock where she arrived later the same day.

18 Feb 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) was to departed Greenock for Portsmouth escorted by armed yacht HMS Cutty Sark. But the sailing has to be postponed as Tetrarch developed problems with her after hydroplanes.

24 Feb 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) carries out exercises with the destroyer HMS Fame (Cdr. P.N. Walter, RN).

4 Mar 1940
After repairs to her after hydroplanes and a period of trials and training in Loch Long, HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) departed Greenock for Portsmouth. She is escorted by HMS Vesper (Lt.Cdr. W.F.E. Hussey, DSC, RN).

6 Mar 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) arrived at Portsmouth.

12 Mar 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) departed Portsmouth for Portland for trials. She arrived at Portland later the same day.

22 Mar 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) departed Portland for Portsmouth where she arrived later the same day.

13 Apr 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) departed Portsmouth for Rosyth escorted by HMS Foxglove. En-route she was diverted to patrol off Lister, Norway making this her 1st war patrol.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tetrarch during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Tetrarch 1st war patrol in a larger map

23 Apr 1940
During an intense A/S hunt against her following a failed attack on an enemy convoy in which the German transport Ahrensburg (2988 GRT, 1939) was missed, HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) torpedoed and sank German auxiliary submarine chaser UJ B / Treff V (330 GRT, built 1936) in the Skagerrak in position 58°21'N, 10°24'E.

(All times are zone -1)
1830 hours - Sighted a Southbound enemy convoy bearing 270°, distance about 5 nautical miles. The convoy was made up of a large merchant vessel and three escorting destroyers. Started attack. [This was the above mentioned Ahrensburg escorted by T 153, T 155, F 5, F 8 and the minesweepers R 33, R 37 and R 40 on passage from Larvik to Fredrikshaven.]

1833 hours - In approximate position 58°18'N, 10°47'E fired two torpedoes, went deep and retired at high speed.

1837 hours - Returned to periscope depth. The three escorting destroyers were seen approaching down the torpedo tracks a high speed. One of the destroyers was only 1500 yards away. Tetrarch went to 300 feet at full speed and under full helm. The hunt for Tetrarch was now own and the first depth charges followed soon afterwards.

Around 2000 hours the hunt was taken over by a flotilla of A/S trawlers.

2220 hours - Surfaced but soon sighted two trawlers 1000 yards away coming straight towards [This were the submarine chasers UJ A and UJ B]. Two torpedoes were fired to discourage their approach. (One of these torpedoes was a hit on UJ-B but this was not noticed on board Tetrarch as she dived upon firing.) [As the torpedoes approached, UJ B made the fatal decision to turn away and was hit broadside on. There were only three survivors.]

Tetrarch was hunted and kept down all through the night. When it became light no ships were in shight but she was unable to surface for fear of detection from the air. Tetrarch eventually surfaced in position 58°45'N, 10°20'E at 2130 hours on 24 April 1940 and set a course for home.

28 Apr 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) ended her 1st war patrol at Rosyth.

10 May 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) was docked at Rosyth.

11 May 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) left dock.

12 May 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) departed Rosyth for her 2nd war patrol. She was to patrol off the West coast of Denmark and off the Skagerrak.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tetrarch during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Tetrarch 2nd war patrol in a larger map

23 May 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) damages the Danish fishing vessel L 61 / Terje Viken (28 GRT) in the North Sea in position 56°55'N, 06°50'E. [It was thought the ship had sunk but the scuttling was not properly done and she was found later by the Danish cutter Grethe adrift and abandoned and was towed to Thyborøn (information provided by Theodor Dorgeist).]

Shortly afterwards Tetrarch captures the Danish fishing vessel L 100 / Immanuel in position 56°59'N, 06°58'E. The ship is taken to Leith as a prize.

(all times are zone -1)
1202 hours - Surfaced in position 56°55'N, 06°50'E and proceeded on main motors to search for fishing vessels.

1215 hours - Embarked four crew from the Danish fishing vessel L 61 / Terje Viken and scuttled their vessel.

1235 hours - Sent a boarding party to the Danish fishing vessel L 100 / Immanuel under command of S.Lt. J.P. Fyfe, RN). Ordered him to make for Leith. While en-route to Leith, another Danish fisihing vessel, the L 156 / Jens Hvas (33 GRT) was captured by the prize crew of the Immanuel. Both ships now proceeded together to Leith.

26 May 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) ended her 2nd war patrol at Rosyth.

29 May 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) was docked at Rosyth.

30 May 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) was undocked.

5 Jun 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) departed Rosyth for her 3rd war patrol. She was to patrol off the South coast of Norway.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tetrarch during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Tetrarch 3rd war patrol in a larger map

16 Jun 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) torpedoed and sank the German tanker Samland (5978 GRT, built 1929) south-west of Lista, Norway in position 58°12'N, 06°13'E.

(All times are zone -1)
0447 hours - Sighted an enemy transport vessel of about 8000 tons right ahead. Range was about 4 nautical miles. Started attack. Three or four small escorts (E-boats or R-boats) [Sammland was escorted by minesweepers from the 3rd R-Flotilla.] were sighted to be screening the enemy.

0508 hours - Fired four torpedoes from 1500 yards and went to 60 feet. Two hits were obtained. Tetrarch eventually went to 250 feet. The enemy dropped only 2 depth charges which did no damage. The hunt continued until around 0900 hours.

0930 hours - Returned to periscope depth. Nothing in sight.

20 Jun 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, RN) ended her 3rd war patrol at Rosyth.

3 Jul 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC, RN) departed Rosyth for her 4th war patrol. She was to patrol off the South-West coast of Norway near Bergen.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tetrarch during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Tetrarch 4th war patrol in a larger map

4 Jul 1940
While en-route to her patrol area, HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC, RN) encounters a submarine in position 57°52'N, 02°47'E. An attack is started but not carried through.

(All times are zone -1)
2200 hours - Sighted a submarine bearing 330°, distance 2 nautical miles. The submarine was thought to be a u-boat so an attack was started.

2220 hours - After 20 minutes of steering a most erratic course the submarine altered course 360° and disappeared.

The submarine sighted might have been HMS Shark (Lt.Cdr. P.N. Buckley, RN). that had left Rosyth the previous day (like Tetrarch) and was also en-route to her patrol area.

5 Jul 1940
At 1938 hours (zone -1) HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC, RN) was attacked by 6 British Swordfish aircraft from 823 Squadron in position 59°17'N, 03°15'E. 5 torpedoes were dropped but no damage to Tetrarch was done as she dived upon spotting the aircraft.

The Swordfish aircraft were on a mission to intercept and attack a German light cruiser escorted by a destroyer that had departed Bergen earlier that day.

15 Jul 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC, RN) attacked the German submarine U-57 with three torpedoes off the entrance to the Kors Fjord near Bergen, Norway. All torpedoes fired missed their target.

(All times are zone -1)
1840 hours - While off the entrance to the Kors Fjord what was thought to be a small sailing vessel was sighted. This however soon was seen to be a u-boat. Started attack.

1846 hours - Fired three torpedoes from 2500 yards. The enemy was able to evade the salvo as she turned hard to Port. Gun action was ordered but this was cancelled as the enemy was seen to submerge.

18 Jul 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC, RN) ended her 4th war patrol at Rosyth.

1 Aug 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC, RN) departed Rosyth for her 5th war patrol. She was to patrol off the West coast of Denmark.

For the daily positions of HMS Tetrarch during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Tetrarch 5th war patrol in a larger map

10 Aug 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC, RN) ended her 5th war patrol at Rosyth.

13 Aug 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC, RN) departed Rosyth for Newcastle for a short refit and docking.

14 Aug 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC, RN) arrived at Newcastle.

28 Aug 1940
With her short refit and docking completed HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC, RN) departed Newcastle for Rosyth where she arrived later the same day.

4 Sep 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC, RN) departed from Rosyth for Gibraltar. She is to join the Mediterranean Fleet.

For the daily positions of HMS Tetrarch during this passage see the map below.


View HMS Tetrarch passage Rosyth - Gibraltar in a larger map

14 Sep 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Gibraltar.

20 Sep 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Gibraltar for her 6th war patrol (1st in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol in the Gulf of Genoa before proceeding to Malta.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tetrarch during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Tetrarch 6th war patrol in a larger map

27 Sep 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC and Bar, RN) attacked what was thought to be an Italian destroyer about 25 nautical miles South-West of La Spezia, Italy in position 43°47'N, 09°34'E. Two torpedoes were fired but these missed. A third torpedo was fired but this also missed. [The target has not yet been identified.]

(All times are zone -1)
2115 hours - While on the surface, charging, sighted a darkened ship about 3000 yards away bearing 200°. Started attack.

2123 hours - Fired two torpedoes which missed. The target was now seen to be a destroyer.

2210 hours - Fired another torpedo which also missed.

2212 hours - Dived. The target was lost out of sight soon after proceeding southwards.

2241 hours - Surfaced.

4 Oct 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC and Bar, RN) attacked wat was identified as a patrol vessel in the Northern part of the Tyrrhenian Sea in position 41°42'N, 10°20'E. Two torpedoes were fired which both missed. [The target has not yet been identified.]

(All times are zone -1)
0035 hours - Sighted a patrol vessel bearing 0° distance about 2 nautical miles. Started attack.

0047 hours - Fired two torpedoes and dived. No hits were obtained.

0130 hours - Surfaced.

11 Oct 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC and Bar, RN) ended her 6th war patrol (1st in the Mediterranean) at Malta.

14 Oct 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC and Bar, RN) was docked at Malta.

17 Oct 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC and Bar, RN) was undocked.

27 Oct 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Malta for her 7th war patrol (2nd in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol in the Gulf of Sirte.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tetrarch during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Tetrarch 7th war patrol in a larger map

2 Nov 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC and Bar, RN) had to break off an attack on an Italian convoy.

(All times are zone -1)
2026 hours - Sighted smoke of a convoy bearing 335°. Distance was thought to be about 5 nautical miles. Started attack.

2156 hours - Dived.

2200 hours - When in position 31°43'N, 19°13'E and about to open fire a motor boat was seen to aproach at high speed. Lt.Cdr. Mills abandoned the attack and took Tetrarch deep.

4 Nov 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC and Bar, RN) torpedoed and heavily damaged the Italian merchant Snia Amba (2532 GRT, built 1918) about 50 nautical miles South-West of Benghazi, Libya in position 31°36'N, 19°25'E. The Italian ship was beached to prevent it from sinking and was later declared a total loss.

The Italian merchant Pallade (1152 GRT, built 1899) was missed in this attack. They were escorted by the Italian torpedo boat Giuseppe La Farina.

(All times are zone -1)
0840 hours - Sighted a convoy bearing 184°. Started attack.

The convoy was later seen to be made up of two large supply ships of 7000 and 5000 tons respectively. They were screened by several destroyers.

0925 hours - In position 31°36'N, 19°25'E fired three torpedoes at the largest merchant vessel, three at the smaller merchant vessel and one at the leading destroyer. Obtained one hit on the larger merchant ship.

0930 hours - Went to 250 feet.

0940 hours - Depth charging started. This continued to 1115 hours. In all 9 depth charges were dropped, all quite close.

1300 hours - Returned to periscope depth. Saw black smoke in the position of the attack.

12 Nov 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.G. Mills, DSC and Bar, RN) ended her 7th war patrol (2nd in the Mediterranean) at Malta.

15 Nov 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) was docked at Malta.

16 Nov 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) was undocked.

24 Nov 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) departed Malta for her 8th war patrol (3rd in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol in the Adriatic, to the North of latitude 42N.

For the daily positions of HMS Tetrarch during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Tetrarch 8th war patrol in a larger map

15 Dec 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) ended her 8th war patrol (3rd in the Mediterranean) at Malta.

28 Dec 1940
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) departed Malta for her 9th war patrol (4th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol off the Gulf of Taranto.

For the daily positions of HMS Tetrarch during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Tetrarch 9th war patrol in a larger map

9 Jan 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) is ordered to leave her patrol area and proceed to Piraeus, Greece.

12 Jan 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) arrives at Piraeus, Greece.

15 Jan 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) departs Piraeus for Alexandria.

19 Jan 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) ended her 9th war patrol (4th in the Mediterranean) at Alexandria.

31 Jan 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) conducts exercises of Alexandria with the British destroyers HMS Greyhound (Cdr. W.R. Marshall-A'Deane, DSO, DSC, RN) and HMS Griffin (Lt.Cdr. J. Lee-Barber, DSO, RN).

2 Feb 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) departed Alexandria for her 10th war patrol (5th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol off Benghazi.

Before proceeding on patrol exercises were carried out with HMS Sindonis (Ch.Skr. G. Rawding, RNR) and HMS Kingston Coral (Skr. W. Kirman, RNR).

For the daily positions of HMS Tetrarch during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Tetrarch 10th war patrol in a larger map

4 Feb 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) is ordered not to patrol of Benghazi anymore as that port was being abandoned by the Italians. She was now ordered to patrol off Tripoli instead.

20 Feb 1941
After a blank patrol in which nothing of the enemy was sighted except a few aircraft, HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) ended her 10th war patrol (5th in the Mediterranean) at Alexandria.

14 Mar 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) departed Alexandria for her 11th war patrol (6th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol off Tripoli.

For the daily positions of HMS Tetrarch during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Tetrarch 11th war patrol in a larger map

16 Mar 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) developed cracks on the Starboard engine. She non the less continued the patrol.

17 Mar 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) is ordered to patrol in the Adriatic. Course was set accordingly.

Later this day further cracks were discovered on the Starboard engine. A signal was sent to inform the Captain of the 1st submarine flotilla of the situation.

18 Mar 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) is ordered to return to Alexandria to repair the Starboard engine. Course was set accordingly.

21 Mar 1941
At 0320 hours, in position 275°- Ras El Tin (Alexandria) – 36.5 nautical miles, HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) sighted what was at first believed to be a U-boat. Nine minutes later, after the vessel had failed to answer repeated challenges, she fired a salvo of six torpedoes at the range of 2000 yds but fortunately missed. This was the ex Italian Zingarella (190 GRT) being brought to Alexandria with a prize crew. The submarine closed to 500 yards and fired one round before the mistake was realised.

Later the same day HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) ended her 11th war patrol (6th in the Mediterranean) at Alexandria.

24 Mar 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) was docked at Alexandria.

25 Mar 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) was undocked.

31 Mar 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) departed Alexandria for her 12th war patrol (7th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol in the Gulf of Sirte and off Tripoli.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tetrarch during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Tetrarch 12th war patrol in a larger map

4 Apr 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) fired two torpedoes at a 1500 tons merchant vessel anchored off Burat. No hits were obtained.

(All times are zone -3)
0955 hours - Sighted masts of vessels anchored off Burat. Closed.

1140 hours - Confirmed that there were four ships at anchor. One appeared to be an armed ocean going tug of about 800 tons. Of the remainder one was a vessel of about 1500 tons, the other two being smaller. It was decided to wait till sunset and then fire two torpedoes, one at the tug and one at the 1500 tons vessel.

1600 hours - The armed tug weighted anchor and proceeded Westward.

1918 hours - Fired a torpedo at the 1500 tons vessel from 5000 yards. The torpedo was seen to break surface so another torpedo was fired at this ship. No hits were obtained.

2025 hours - Surfaced and proceeded Eastwards.

7 Apr 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) engages two schooners with gunfire off El Brega. After it was thought Tetrarch was being fired upon from El Brega fort the action was broken off.

(All times are zone -3)
1100 hours - Arrived off El Brega. A heavy swell was running. Sighted two schooners at anchor. Later one was seen to be a wreck, the other was in ballast.

1915 hours - Surfaced and engaged the schooners with the 4" gun from a range of 5000 yards. One or two shots burst on El Brega fort and it was reported that the fort was opening fire (this was however not the case). Dived and hit the bottom at 11 fathoms. When the mistake was realised and Tetrarch was in an attack position again it was too dark to resume gun action. Proceeded along the coast to the West.

10 Apr 1941
At 2202 hours (zone -3) HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) received a signal ordered her to proceed with despatch towards Tripoli.

12 Apr 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) torpedoed and sank the Italian tanker Persiano (2474 GRT, built 1889) about 30 nautical miles north-west of Tripoli, Libya in position 33°29'N, 13°01'E.

(All times are zone -3)
0830 hours - Sighted a convoy consisting of five merchant vessels, 3 destroyers and 1 aircraft overhead in position 340° Tripoli light, 37 nautical miles. The course of the convoy was 150° estimated speed was 10 knots. Started attack.

Fired four torpedoes at the nearest leading ship (a laden 8000 tons tanker). Range was 4500 yards. Went deep upon firing as the aircraft was near. One explosion was heard after the correct time interval.

Following the attack Tetrarch was hunted for 3 hours by the escorts, 9 depth charges were dropped but these did no damage.

1200 hours - Came to periscope depth and saw the tanker bearing 180° distance about 5 nautical miles. She was listing heavily with her stern awash and on fire aft. Considered her a total loss so retired to the North.

1610 hours - Depth charging recommenced astern. 15 depth charges were dropped but these were way off.

2027 hours - Surfaced and proceeded Northwards.

The convoy attacked was made up of the above mentioned tanker Persiano, the Italian merchants Bosforo (3648 GRT, built 1929), Ogaden (4553 GRT, built 1905) and the Italian tanker Superga (6154 GRT, built 1923). They were escorted by the Italian torpedo boats Generale Carlo Montanari, Giuseppe Missori and Perseo. [The torpedo-boat Montanari sighted the torpedo tracks and took avoiding action but Persiano was hit and sunk. The torpedo-boat was ordered to attack the submarine and then rescue the survivors. The torpedo-boats Partenope and Polluce sailed from Tripoli to assist her.]

13 Apr 1941
At 2100 hours (zone -3) HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) was ordered to intercept a convoy but as Tetrarch was not in a position to intercept it course was set for Alexandria.

20 Apr 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) ended her 12th war patrol (7th in the Mediterranean) at Alexandria.

1 May 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) was docked at Alexandria.

5 May 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) was undocked.

6 May 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) departed Alexandria for her 13th war patrol (8th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol off Benghazi.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tetrarch during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Tetrarch 13th war patrol in a larger map

18 May 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) torpedoed and sank the Italian merchant Giovinezza (2362 GRT, built 1925) off Bengasi, Libya in position 31°55'N, 19°55'E.

(All times are zone -3)
1254 hours - Sighted one merchant vessel bearing 285°, distance 7 nautical miles. Started attack.

1310 hours - Sighted a destroyer that was escorting the merchant vessel.

1446 hours - Fired four torpedoes from 6000 yards. It was thought that all four torpedoes were heard to explode on the shore (this was however not the case).

1453 hours - Depth charging started.

1515 hours - Bottomed at 150 feet.

1600 hours - Depth charging ceased. In all 18 depth charges were dropped.

[According to Italian sources Giovinezza was escorted by the Italian torpedo boat Polluce which dropped 20 depth charges all set to 25 metres (the depth in the area was 40 metres) then returned to pick up the survivors. By then most of them had rowed to shore in two life boats and the torpedo-boat picked up only one survivor. In all there were 42 survivors (including five wounded), two were killed and another was missing.]

25 May 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) ended her 13th war patrol (8th in the Mediterranean) at Alexandria.

6 Jun 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) departed Alexandria for her 14th war patrol (9th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol in the Aegean.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tetrarch during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Tetrarch 14th war patrol in a larger map

25 Jun 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) engages the Italian motor sailing vessel Alleanza off Cape Paraspori, Greece in approximate position 35°55'N, 27°16'E. As the 4" gun malfunctioned after the first round the action was broken off.

(All times are zone -2)
0515 hours - Sighted a small sailing vessel approaching from the Eastwards.

0600 hours - In position 045° Cape Paraspori, Greece 2 nautical miles engaged with gunfire. After the first round the gun failed to run out. Gave the target 2 pans of the Lewis gun and then dived. Before opening fire the vessel was seen to fly the Italian flag that was replaced shortly afterwards with the Greek flag.

28 Jun 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) ended her 14th war patrol (9th in the Mediterranean) at Alexandria.

3 Jul 1941
Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN takes over command of HMS Tetrarch from Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN.

Lt.Cdr. Peacock was relieved because of his lack of initiative shown on previous patrols.

12 Jul 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) departed Alexandria for her 15th war patrol (10th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol in the Aegean.

Before proceeding on patrol exercises were carried out with the Greek destroyer Spetsai.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tetrarch during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Tetrarch 15th war patrol in a larger map

16 Jul 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) is narrowly missed by a torpedo when in position 220°, Cape Pappas (Nikaria), 10 nautical miles.

(All times are zone -3)
0115 hours - While in position 220°, Cape Pappas (Nikaria), 10 nautical miles (about 37°22'N, 25°54'E), Tetrarch was attacked by what were thought to be two Motor Torpedo Boats. The Officer of the Watch altered course towards the first one sighted and when Lt.Cdr. Greenway sighted the second one he altered course towards this one and dived. Just before diving a torpedo track was seen to pass close astern. Tetrarch was most likely saved by the quick reaction of the Officer of the Watch. No depth charges were dropped and when Tetrarch came to periscope depth at 0500 hours nothing was in sight.

Tetrarch had actually been attacked by the Italian submarine Nereide who fired two torpedoes from 700 metres and claimed one hit. The Italians give 37°25'N, 25°52'E as the position of the attack.

17 Jul 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) carried out a special operation (details to follow).

18 Jul 1941
At 0904 hours, in approximate position 37°33'N, 24°26'E, HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) is depth charged by an enemy destroyer while trying to attack a convoy near Thermia, Greece. No damage to Tetrach was done but the attack had to be broken off.

20 Jul 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) attacks an enemy convoy off Thermia. When about to open fire one of the escorts came straight towards Tetrarch. The initial attack failed but one torpedo was fired at the other ship of the convoy. This torpedo however missed the target.

(All times are zone -3)
0928 hours - While in position 360° - Cape Kephalos - 1.7 nautical miles (Approximately 37°31'N, 24°26'E), sighted a convoy coming North through the Thermia Channel. This convoy consisted of two 5000 tons vessels escorted by one armed merchant cruiser, two destroyers, three MAS-boats and two aircraft. Started attack on the port ship of the convoy.

When about to open fire the AMC was seen to come straight towards. She passed over Tetrarch's stern but did not drop depth charges. The attack on the port ship of the convoy however now had failed. Now one torpedo was fired at the starboard ship from 4000 yards but it missed it's target.

1015 to 1046 hours - 16 Depth charges were dropped but none was close and no damage to Tetrarch was done.

[This torpedo however missed the target. This was probably the Cuneo convoy which consisted of Citta di Trapani (2467 GRT, built 1929), Citta di Agrigento (2480 GRT, built 1930) escorted by the armed merchant cruiser Brioni (1987 GRT, built 1931), the torpedo-boats Libra and Lince and MAS 535 and MAS 539 on passage from Piraeus (they had sailed at 0500/20) to Syra.]

22 Jul 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) bombards the harbour of Karlovassi, Samos, Greece.

(All times are zone -3)
1411 hours - Surfaced off Karlovassi and carried out a bombardment of the caiques that were in the harbour (about 7 or 8 large ones were seen). The shooting was not very good and the caiques were partially protected by the breakwater. 39 rounds were fired for only a few hits. After four minutes fire was returned from shore with machine guns. Just before the 39th round was fired the breach-worker of the gun crew was wounded in the head and knocked unconsious. The action was now broken off and Tetrarch dived.

[According to Italian sources a few houses were damaged and an unnamed schooner was hit and her captain killed.]

25 Jul 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) twice attacked the Greek merchant (in German service) Olympos (852 GRT, built 1904) near Gaidaro Island, Greece. The vessel is not hit.

(All times are zone -3)
0600 hours - Sighted a merchant ship (two masts, funnel aft, about 1000 tons) bearing 315°, range about 12000 yards. Started attack.

0645 hours - Fired one torpedo from 400 yards. The torpedo failed to run straight so it missed astern. The torpedo was later heard to explode on the shore.

0901 hours - Found the same ship as earlier anchored off Cape Colonna. Closed to 1800 yards and fired one torpedo. This torpedo slightly ran to Port and just missed astern of the target. The torpedo exploded on the beach.

Olympos was escorted by the Italian minesweeper R.D.9. One torpedo was later recovered by the German patrol vessel 12 V 10 and brought to Piraeus on 27 July.

27 Jul 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) sank the Greek (in German service) sailing vessel Kal 123 / Nikitas (40 GRT) with gunfire half a mile south of the channel to Nio, Greece in approximate position 36°42'N, 25°15'E.

(All times are zone -3)
1000 hours - While half a mile south of the entrance to Port Nio surfaced and attacked a caique with gunfire at a range of 500 yards. Five rounds were fired of which the last two were hits. The caique was now on fire. She was flying the Nazi flag and was full of soldiers of which only two were seen to escape in a small boat. According to Italian sources one was killed and two were wounded.

31 Jul 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) ended her 15th war patrol (10th in the Mediterranean) at Alexandria.

11 Aug 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) departed Alexandria for her 16th war patrol (11th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol in the Gulf of Sirte.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tetrarch during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Tetrarch 16th war patrol in a larger map

16 Aug 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) attacks the Italian torpedo boat Perseo that is anchored inside Benghazi harbour. Two torpedoes were fired that both exploded on the boom.

(All times are zone -3)
After having patrolled the approaches to Benghasi all day, Lt.Cdr. Greenway decided to attack a torpedo boat that was anchored inside the harbour near the entrance. By firing on a course of 127° in the hope to find the gap in the boom so at .....

1828 hours - Fired two torpedoes from 3500 yards. Both torpedoes exploded on the boom. The torpedo boat got underway and was out of the harbour in 10 minutes where she proceeded to drop 12 depth charges in over half an hour. The last three were rather close but this appeared to be just coincidence.

19 Aug 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) attacks an Italian convoy off Benghasi. The Italian merchant Cadamosto (1010 GRT, built 1905) was missed in this attack.

(All times are zone -3)
0715 hours - In approximate position 32°04'N, 20°00'E sighted a convoy of two merchant ships of about 4000 tons approaching Benghasi. A torpedo boat, a trawler and two aircraft were the escorts. Started attack.

As it appeared Tetrarch was spotted during the attack by the torpedo boat, Lt.Cdr. Greenway went deep and fired a three torpedoes as of 0809 hours.

It appeared one of the torpedoes was a hit (this was not the case). Tetrarch hit bottom at 64 feet. During a counter attack lasting almost three-quarters of an hour 37 depth charges were dropped, but only 6 were close causing some minor damage. Tetrarch was able to creep away during these attacks.

The convoy was made up of the above mentioned Cadamosto and the (1010 BRT), Una (1397 BRT, built 1904). They were escorted by the Italian torpedo boat Calliope which according to Italian sources turned in time to see a torpedo passing only three metres alongside.

23 Aug 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) torpedoed and sank the Italian schooner V 72/Fratelli Garre (413 GRT) in position 350° - Sirte Lighthouse - 12 nautical miles (approximately 31°24'N, 16°33'E).

[According to Italian sources the other vessels in company were the above mentioned schooner were the schooners Francesco Garré and Alula, escorted by the auxiliary minesweeper Proteo. Fratelli Garré sank in three minutes. Of a crew of 15, there were six missing, three killed and four seriously wounded. The survivors were picked up by Proteo who reported being narrowly missed by gunfire.]

(All times are zone -3)

22 August 1941
1315 hours - Sighted a convoy made up of a 1500 tons merchant vessel, 5 large schooners. They were escorted by one destroyer (or torpedo boat) and one large trawler. The convoy was close inshore, too close to attack in that shallow water. Followed the convoy to attack it the next day if the opportunity would arise.

2312 hours - Overtook the convoy. Decided to attack it at dawn if possible.

23 August 1941
0615 hours - Sighted the convoy again but i now only consisted of three of the schooners and the trawler, there was no sign of the rest. Closed with the intention of attacking the trawler with gunfire from submerged. This was frustrated by the arrival of an air patrol.

0730 hours - Fired one torpedo at the leading schooner and one at the second schooner. Range was 500 yards. Obtained a hit on the leading schooner. Went deep upon firing but no counter attack followed.

0750 hours - One of the schooners had sunk, the other two and the trawler were steaming towards Sirte. Decided to proceed towards Benghasi as the convoy would now proceed close inshore in shallow water.

In the evening a signal was received from Capt. S-1 that made Lt.Cdr. Greenway decide not to proceed to Benghasi. He turned back towards Sirte in the hope the schooners had remained there. This was later seen to be the case but it was too late to attack by day.

24 Aug 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) torpedoed and sank the Italian schooner V 113/Francesco Garre (399 GRT) near Sirte in approximate position 31°14'N, 16°36'E. The other schooner Alula was missed. Francesco Garré had one killed and two wounded.

(All times are zone -3)
Tried to attack the two schooners but the were swung with their bows to seaward. Gave up the attack and decided to wait until daylight.

0600 hours - The schooners were now swung more favourably. Decided to attack with torpedoes.

0702 hours - Fired one torpedo at the larger of the two, range was 3500 yards. When that one hit fired another one at the second schooner but this one missed. An aircraft was now sighted so went deep and retired from the area. Approximate position was 31°14'N, 16°36'E.

28 Aug 1941
At 1315 hours (zone -3) HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) is attacked, in error, by a British Blenheim aircraft (203 Sq./P). Position was approximately 32°03'N, 24°57'E. The aircraft machine gunned Tetrarch and dropped four 250lbs. bombs that all failed to explode.

30 Aug 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) ended her 16th war patrol (11th in the Mediterranean) at Alexandria.

2 Sep 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) was docked at Alexandria.

6 Sep 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) was undocked.

14 Sep 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) departed Alexandria for her 17th war patrol (12th in the Mediterranean). She was to patrol in Aegean.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tetrarch during this patrol see the map below.


View HMS Tetrarch 17th war patrol in a larger map

18 Sep 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) carried out a special operation. During 2100 - 2215 hours two Army officers (Captains Mark Ogilvie-Grant and Alfred W. Lawrence of the Royal tank Regiment ) and one Greek agent (Nikolaos Hatzikambouris) were landed off Shkodra, Greece. They were to contact Greek SOE agent Prometheus II (Cdr Koutsoyannopoulos of the RHN).

22 Sep 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) carried out a special operation. Attemps were made to contact the party landed on the 18th but no contact was made this day.

This mission was acutually to be carried out by HMS Otus but she was unable to sail for patrol due to defects.

23 Sep 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) continued to carry out the special operation started yesterday. Contact is established with the Captain Lawrence who was landed on the 18th. He informs Lt.Cdr. Greenway that no soldiers could be evacuated right now but that 40 could be evacuated on the 25th when HMS Osiris (Lt. R.S Brookes, DSC, RN) would take them off. Eventually they did not turn up. Both English agents were captured by the enemy.

27 Sep 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway) torpedoed sank the Italian merchant Citta di Bastia (2499 GRT, built 1930) in the Aegean Sea about 18 nautical miles south of Milos Island, Greece in position 36°21'N, 24°23'E.

Later on this day HMS Tetrarch also sank the Greek sailing vessel (in Italian service) CH 48 / Poseidon (74 GRT) with gunfire south-west of Milos Island, Greece in approximate position 36°30'N, 24°00'E.

(All times are zone -3)
0553 hours - Sighted a convoy consisting of two 5000 tons merchant vessels (These were the above mentioned Citta di Bastia and the Citta di Marsala (2480 GRT, built 1929)) and the escorted by a large armed merchant cruiser (this was the Brioni (1987 GRT, built 1931) and what was thought to be the torpedo boat Libra. The remainder of the convoy was seen to be 5 miles astern and was seen to be made up of two merchant ships (These were the German Trapani (1855 GRT, built 1926) and the Italian Santagata (4262 GRT, built 1905) escorted by a destroyer (this was the Quintino Sella. Started attack.

0620 hours - Fired two torpedoes at the second ship from 1500 yards. Went deep upon firing and took avoiding action. 1 Minute and 10 seconds after firing the first torpedo a loud explosion was heard.

0630 hours - The first depth charge exploded.

0642 hours - The target was heard to break up and sink.

0714 hours - The last depth charge, of 17, was heard to explode. None had been close.

0813 hours - Returned to periscope depth. The armed merchant cruiser was seen near the position where the ship was hit. The Libra (the identification by Lt.Cdr. Greenway was correct) and the Sella were hunting 3000 yards astern. Also there were two seaplanes patrolling the area. Passing to the Northward were the two rear ships of the convoy, these were merchant vessels of 7000 and 4000 tons (Trapani and Sant’Agata). As they presented an unbroken line of target Lt.Cdr. Greenway put Tetrarch on a firing course and at .....

0826 hours - Fired two torpedoes from 5000 yards. No hits were obtained.

0834 hours - A depth charge was dropped. Four more were dropped over the next minutes but these were way off.

1230 hours - The last escort now left the area.

-------------------------------------------

1650 hours - Sighted a caique steering 350° flying the Italian ensign. Decided to attack with gunfire.

1810 hours - Surfaced in position 270° Ananes Lighthouse, 6 nautical miles (approximately 36°30'N, 24°00'E) and engaged the target with gunfire from 3000 yards. As the target was difficult to hit from that range, ceased fire after 10 rounds and closed to 500 yards. The target was now sunk. At least 20 Italian soldiers were seen to be on board. In all 42 rounds were used for about 9 hits.

28 Sep 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) torpedoed and damaged the German merchant Yalova (3751 GRT, built 1920) in the Aegean Sea south of Agios Giorgios Island.

(All times are zone -3)
2315 hours - In position 170° St. Giorgio Island, 24 nautical miles (approximately 37°10'N, 24°00'E) the Officer of the Watch sighted some ships approaching and these were later identified as two large merchant ships (with possibly a third astern). There were two destroyers of torpedo boats present, one on each bow. Their course was 350°, speed 8 knots. Started attack.

2329 hours - Dived for a submerged attack.

2337 hours - Fired two torpedoes (the third misfired) at one of the merchant ships from 2500 yards. 1 Minute and 45 seconds after firing the first torpedo a loud explosion was heard.

2347 hours - The first of ten depth charges was dropped. None were quite close except one but this was pure coincidence.

0045 hours (29th) - The last depth charge was dropped.

0310 hours (29th) - The last HE fainted out to the Northward.

0349 hours (29th) - Surfaced to find nothing in sight.

According to Italian sources the Yalova was in convoy with Citta di Marsala (2480 GRT, built 1929). They were escorted by the destroyer Quintino Sella and the torpedo boat Libra. Yalova had nine killed and had to be beached to prevent her from sinking.

3 Oct 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) ended her 17th war patrol (12th in the Mediterranean) at Alexandria.

17 Oct 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) departed Alexandria for Malta.

24 Oct 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) arrived at Malta.

26 Oct 1941
HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) departed Malta for Gibraltar. She was to proceed to the U.S.A. for refit, via Gibraltar and the U.K.

27 Oct 1941
At 1400 hours (time zone -2) HMS Tetrarch (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, RN) communicated through SST with HMS P 34 (Lt. P.R.H. Harrison, DSC, RN) in approximate position 37°28'N, 12°35E. She was not heard from afterwards.

The next day, at 1032 hours, Italian aircraft No.4 of 287^Squadriglia on an R.10 reconnaissance patrol, sighted an oil slick 500 meters long and believed it to be from a sunken ship or submarine in position 37°39'N, 11°00'E. This could well have been from Tetrarch as it was consistent with her route to patrol off Cavoli Island. However aircraft No.5 of 146^Squadriglia had already reported an oil slick on 25 October in 37°30'N, 10°50'E so if it was the same then it could not have been Tetrarch. The mystery of her disappearance remains unsolved. Lt.Cdr. G.H. Greenway, four officers and 54 ratings of her crew and another three officers who were passengers were lost.

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