Allied Warships

HMCS St. Croix (I 81)

Destroyer of the Town class


HMCS St.Croix as seen during the war.

NavyThe Royal Canadian Navy
TypeDestroyer
ClassTown 
PennantI 81 
Built byBethlehem Shipbuilding Corp. (Quincy, Massachusetts, U.S.A.) 
Ordered 
Laid down11 Sep 1918 
Launched31 Jan 1919 
Commissioned24 Sep 1940 
Lost20 Sep 1943 
Loss position57° 30'N, 31° 10'W
History

HMCS St. Croix (A/Lt.Cdr. Andrew Hedley Dobson, DSC, RCNR) was torpedoed and sunk south of Iceland in position 57º30'N, 31º10'W by U-305 while escorting convoy ON.202.
The ship was one of the first victims of the new developed acoustic torpedo Gnat.
Of the 5 officers and 76 men picked up by the British frigate HMS Itchen (sunk by German U-boat U-666), only one, Leading Stoker William Allen Fisher, survived the sinking of the Itchen a few days later.

 

Hit by U-boat
Sunk on 20 Sep 1943 by U-305 (Bahr).

U-boat AttackSee our U-boat attack entry for the HMCS St. Croix
Former nameUSS McCook (DD 252)

Commands listed for HMCS St. Croix (I 81)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Lt.Cdr. Harry Kingsley, RCN24 Sep 194010 Dec 1941
2T/Lt. Ian Hunter Bell, RCNVR11 Dec 19415 Jan 1942
3A/Lt.Cdr. Andrew Hedley Dobson, RCNR6 Jan 194220 Sep 1943 (+)

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Noteable events involving St. Croix include:


Photograph taken by Charles James Sadler, RCNVR. First Class Stoker, Official number V-4963, serving in the Canadian destroyer HMCS Columbia.

2 Oct 1941
HMCS St. Croix (Cdr. H. Kingsley, RCN) picks up 34 survivors from the Dutch merchant Tuva that was torpedoed and sunk the previous day by German U-boat U-575 in the North Atlantic southwest of Iceland in position 54°16'N, 26°36'W.

24 Jul 1942
German U-boat U-90 was sunk in the Northern Atlantic, in position 48°12'N, 40°56'W by depth charges from the Canadian destroyer HMCS St Croix (A/Lt.Cdr. A.H. Dobson, RCNR).

10 Sep 1942
At 21.10 hours on 10 September 1942 German U-boat U-659 attacked the convoy ON-127 southwest of Iceland and reported hits on two ships. In fact, two torpedoes hit the British tanker Empire Oil at the bow and stern and stopped the tanker. At 01.47 hours the next day, German U-boat U-584 sank the drifting Empire Oil with two coups de gr?ce. The master, 12 crew members and six gunners were picked up by the Canadian destroyer HMCS St Croix (A/Lt.Cdr. A.N. Dobson, RCNR) and landed at St. John's on 15 September. 29 crew members and five gunners were picked up by the Canadian destroyer HMCS Ottawa (A/Lt.Cdr. C.A. Rutherford, RCN) On 14 September, 13 crew members and five gunners were lost when this destroyer was torpedoed and sunk by German U-boat U-91.

4 Mar 1943
German U-boat U-87 was sunk west of Leixoes, in position 41°36'N, 13°31'W, by depth charges from the Canadian corvette HMCS Shediac (Lt. J.E. Clayton, RCNR) and the Canadian destroyer HMCS St. Croix (A/Lt.Cdr. A.H. Dobson, DSC, RCNR).

12 Apr 1943
The Canadian destroyer HMCS St. Croix (A/Lt.Cdr. A.H. Dobson, DSC, RCNR) and the Canadian corvette HMCS Camrose (Lt L.R. Pavillard, RCNVR) together pick up 28 survivors from the Norwegian merchant Ingerfire that was torpedoed and sunk about 400 miles east of Newfoundland, Canada in position 51°29'N, 42°59'W.

12 Apr 1943
The Canadian destroyer HMCS St. Croix (A/Lt.Cdr. A.H. Dobson, DSC, RCNR) and the Canadian corvette HMCS Camrose (Lt L.R. Pavillard, RCNVR) together pick up 28 survivors from the Norwegian merchant Ingerfire that was torpedoed and sunk the previous day about 400 miles east of Newfoundland, Canada in position 51°29'N, 42°59'W.

Media links


U-Boat Attack Logs

Daniel Morgan and Bruce Taylor


Destroyers of World War Two

Whitley, M. J.


Deadly Seas

Bercuson, David Jay and Herwig, Holger H.


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