Allied Warships

HMS Tally-Ho (P 317)

Submarine of the T class

NavyThe Royal Navy
TypeSubmarine
ClassT 
PennantP 317 
ModThird Group 
Built byVickers Armstrong (Barrow-in-Furness, U.K.) : John Brown Shipbuilding & Engineering Company Ltd. (Clydebank, Scotland) 
Ordered4 Nov 1940 
Laid down25 Mar 1942 
Launched23 Dec 1942 
Commissioned12 Apr 1943 
End service 
History

Scrapped at Briton Ferry, Wales on 10 February 1967.

 
Former nameP 97

Commands listed for HMS Tally-Ho (P 317)

Please note that we're still working on this section
and that we only list Commanding Officers for the duration of the Second World War.

CommanderFromTo
1Lt.Cdr. Leslie William Abel Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN25 Jan 1943Apr 1945
2Lt. Christopher Theodore Martin Thurlow, DSC, RNRApr 194522 May 1945
3Lt. John Paton Fyfe, DSC, RN22 May 1945

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Notable events involving Tally-Ho include:


The history of HMS Tally-Ho as compiled on this page is extracted from the patrol reports and logbooks of this submarine and was created in June 2010. Corrections and details regarding information from the enemy's side (for instance the composition of convoys attacked) is kindly provided by Mr. Platon Alexiades, a naval researcher from Canada.

This page was last updated in November 2018.

10 Apr 1943
Around 1530B/10, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) departed her builders yard at Barrow for Holy Loch. She was escorted by HMS Kirkella (T/Lt. M.J. Rowlands, RNVR). (1)

11 Apr 1943
Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) carried out a full power trial in the Clyde area following which she proceeded to Gare Loch for further trials.

On completion of these trials she proceeded to Holy Loch where she arrived around 1608B/11. (1)

12 Apr 1943
Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted full speed trials on the Arran measured mile. On completion of this trial she was accepted from the shipyard. (1)

14 Apr 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted exercises in Loch Long. (1)

15 Apr 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted exercises in the Clyde area. (1)

16 Apr 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted exercises in the Clyde area. (1)

17 Apr 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted exercises in the Clyde area. (1)

19 Apr 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted gunnery, STU (mine detection) and D/F trials in the Clyde area. (1)

20 Apr 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) proceeded from Holy Loch to Arrochar for her torpedo discharge trials. (1)

21 Apr 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted torpedo discharge trials off Arrochar. (1)

23 Apr 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted torpedo discharge trials off Arrochar. (1)

24 Apr 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted torpedo discharge trials off Arrochar. (1)

25 Apr 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted torpedo discharge trials off Arrochar. (1)

26 Apr 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted torpedo discharge trials off Arrochar. (1)

27 Apr 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted torpedo discharge trials off Arrochar. (1)

28 Apr 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted torpedo discharge trials off Arrochar. Upon completion of these trials she proceeded to Holy Loch. (1)

1 May 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted noise trials in Loch Goil. (2)

2 May 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted noise trials in Loch Goil. (2)

3 May 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted noise trials in Loch Goil. (2)

4 May 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted noise trials in Loch Goil. (2)

5 May 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted noise trials in Loch Goil. (2)

6 May 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted noise trials in Loch Goil. (2)

7 May 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted noise trials in Loch Goil. (2)

9 May 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted exercises in the Clyde area including night exercises during which attacks on a convoy were made. (2)

10 May 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) returned to Holy Loch on completion of last night exercises. (2)

13 May 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted attack exercises in the Clyde area. (2)

14 May 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted gunnery exercises in the Clyde area. (2)

15 May 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted exercises in the Clyde area. (2)

16 May 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) is docked at Rothesay in AFD 20. (2)

17 May 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) is undocked. (2)

19 May 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted attack exercises in the Clyde area. (2)

20 May 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted log calibration trials in Loch Long. (2)

22 May 1943
In the evening HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) and FFS Curie (Lt. P.M. Sonneville) both conducted attack exercises in the Clyde area during which they served as targets for each other. (2)

23 May 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted exercises in the Clyde area for the C.O.Q.C. (Commanding Officers Qualifying Course). (2)

24 May 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted exercises in the Clyde area for the C.O.Q.C. (Commanding Officers Qualifying Course). (2)

27 May 1943
Around 1400B/27, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) departed from Holy Loch bound for Lerwick. She made part of the passage together with HMS Sceptre (Lt. I.S. McIntosh, MBE, DSC, RN) and FFS Curie (Lt. P.M. Sonneville) for passage North. They were escorted by HMS Columbine T/A/Lt.Cdr. W.J. Griffiths, RNR). (2)

29 May 1943
Around 1620B/29, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) arrived at Lerwick from Holy Loch. (2)

31 May 1943
Around 1200B/31, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) departed from Lerwick for her 1st war patrol (Work-up patrol). She is to patrol in the Norwegian Sea. This is an Anti-U-boat patrol.

For the daily positions of HMS Tally-Ho during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

17 Jun 1943
Around 1000B/17, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) ended her 1st war patrol, which had been uneventful, at Lerwick.

She proceeded to Holy Loch around 1900B/17 together with HMS Truculent (Lt.Cdr. R.L. Alexander, RN) escorted by armed yacht HMS Breda (Capt.(Retd.) A.E. Johnston, RN). (3)

20 Jun 1943
Around 0715B/20, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) arrived at Holy Loch.

29 Jun 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) departed from Holy Loch to proceed to Larne. (4)

30 Jun 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) arrived at Larne. She conducted exercises with aircraft off Larne later the same day. (4)

1 Jul 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted convoy attack exercises off Larne. (5)

2 Jul 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted attack exercises off Larne. (5)

5 Jul 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted exercises with aircraft off Larne. (5)

7 Jul 1943
HMS Proteus (Lt. A.R. Profit, DSC, RN), HMS Truant (Lt.Cdr. J.G. Hopkins, RN) and HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted exercises off Larne with each other. (6)

8 Jul 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) proceeded from Larne to Holy Loch. (5)

15 Jul 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) is docked in AFD 7 at Holy Loch. (5)

16 Jul 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) is undocked. (5)

18 Jul 1943
Around 1500B/18, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) departed from Holy Loch for her 2nd war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Bay of Biscay and proceed to Gibraltar afterwards. This is an anti-U-boat patrol.

Around 2115B/18, she was joined by HMS White Bear (Cdr. J.F. Drake, RNR) which was to escort her southwards through the Irish Sea.

HMS White Bear parted company around 1335B/20. (3)

18 Jul 1943
For the daily positions of HMS Tally-Ho during her 2nd war patrol see the map below.

25 Jul 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) sighted two U-boats this day. Both could not be attacked.

0809B/25 - Sighted the conning tower of a U-boat about 8000/9000 yards away. The U-boat was in position 45°50'N, 05°17'W The course of the U-boat was 60 to 90° (so she must be returning to base). Before Tally-Ho could turn on a firing course the U-boat had disappeared into the morning haze. (This must have been the German U-boat U-667 was in this area and was returning to St. Nazaire, where she arrived the following day)

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1158B/25 - Sighted a U-boat steering south-west in position 45°54'N, 05°18'W. Closed to start an attack.

1209B/25 - The U-boat was now seen steering 230° at a speed of about 8 to 10 knots. The range was between 5000/6000 yards. Before the U-boat could be attacked it was seen to dive. (German U-boat U-404 that had left St. Nazaire for patrol the previous day and was most likely in this area (She was lost a few days later with all hands, so this can't be cross checked). Two other U-boats were also in transfer to their patrol areas, these were U-262 and U-760. They had left La Pallice the previous day but were a bit further south and west) (3)

30 Jul 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) encounters, what is thought to be, a U-boat in position 45°05'N, 05°17'W.

This was indeed a German U-boat as U-455 reported having sighted a submarine at the same time.

0338B/30 - The port forward look-out reported a slight phosphorescent streak bearing Red 060°. A moment later he reported that he could see two wakes. The sea was then calm and rather patchy and the night was very dark. It took about two minutes before the Officer of the Watch and the Commanding Officer could see what the look-out had sighted although the latter kept his glasses firmly glued on his find. After chasing the wake for five minutes it disappeared. The engines were stopped and soon the Asdic operator reported HE bearing 110°. Tally-Ho set off in pursuit but nothing could be seen. A few minutes later the engines were again stopped. The HE could again be heard but was very faint.

0353B/30 - The HE could no longer be heard. Abandoned the chase. (7)

7 Aug 1943
Around 1425B/7, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) ended her 2nd war patrol at Gibraltar. (3)

9 Aug 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted D/G trials off Gibraltar. (5)

15 Aug 1943
Around 1715B/15, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) departed from Gibraltar for her 3rd war patrol (1st in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol off southern France.

On departure from harbour she conducted gunnery exercises and also a practice attack was made on HMS Isis (Cdr. B. Jones, DSO, DSC, RN). (5)

15 Aug 1943
For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tally-Ho during her 3rd war patrol see the map below.

18 Aug 1943

Combined convoy OG 92 / KMS 24.

This convoy assembled off Oversay on 18 August 1943. It was made up of the following merchant vessels; Auk (British, 1338 GRT, built 1921), Bactria (British, 2407 GRT, built 1928), Baron Semple (British, 4573 GRT, built 1939), Bodegraven (Dutch, 5541 GRT, 1929), Cape Brenton (British, 6044 GRT, built 1940), City of Hongkong (British, 9609 GRT, built 1924), City of Lancaster (British, 3041 GRT, built 1924), City of Lille (British, 6588 GRT, built 1928), Conakrian (British, 4876 GRT, built 1937), Delius (British, 6065 GRT, built 1937), Empire Mortimer (British, 7051 GRT, built 1943), Empire Rhodes (British, 7030 GRT, built 1941), Empire Service (British, 7067 GRT, built 1943), Empire Snow (British, 6327 GRT, built 1941), Empire Spey (British, 4292 GRT, built 1929), Empire Summer (British, 6949 GRT, built 1941), Empire Wolfe (British, 2888 GRT, built 1941), Eurybates (British, 6276 GRT, built 1928), Exilona (American, 5593 GRT, built 1919), Flaminian (British, 2711 GRT, built 1917), Fort Camosun (British, 7126 GRT, built 1942), Fort Coulonge (British, 7136 GRT, built 1943), Fort Fidler (British, 7127 GRT, built 1943), Fort Glenora (British, 7126 GRT, built 1943), Fort Thompson (British, 7134 GRT, built 1942), Highwear (British, 1173 GRT, built 1936), Howra (British, 6709 GRT, built 1922), Langleebrook (British, 4246 GRT, built 1930), Leonardia (Swedish, 1583 GRT, built 1906), Lightfoot (British, 1894 GRT, built 1922) Lom (Norwegian, 1268 GRT, built 1920), Macharda (British, 7998 GRT, built 1938), Manchester Exporter (British, 5277 GRT, built 1918), Mers el Kebir (French, 2052 GRT, built 1917), Ocean Angel (British, 7178 GRT, built 1942), Ocean Vestal (British, 7174 GRT, built 1942), P.L.M. 13 (British, 3754 GRT, built 1921) and Skeldergate (British, 4251 GRT, built 1930).

The escort oiler Scottish American (British (tanker), 6999 GRT, built 1920) and rescue vessel Zamalek (British, 1567 GRT, built 1921) were also part of the convoy.

On assembly off Oversay the convoy was escorted by the desroyers HMS Hurricane (Cdr. E.C. Bayldon, DSC, RN, HMS Wanderer (Lt.Cdr. R.F. Whinney, RN) and the corvettes HMS Borage (T/Lt.Cdr. A. Harrison, RNR), HMS Hydrangea (T/A/Lt.Cdr. F.S. Howell, RNR), HMS Monkshood (Lt. G.W. McGuiness, RNR) and HMS Wallflower (Lt. G.R. Greaves, RNR). Also part of the escort was the sloop HMS Cygnet (Lt.Cdr.(Retd.) F.B. Proudfoot, RN) which initially was part of the A/S escort but after the convoy would cross 46°00'N she was to act as AA ship during daylight being stationed astern of the convoy and she was to be part of the A/S escort during the night.

The merchant vessel Zaanstroom (Dutch, 1646 GRT, built 1920) sailed late and joined the convoy around 1030A/19 in position 55°08'N, 10°00'W, with the corvette HMS Dahlia (T/Lt. M.S. Work, RNR) which had remained behind to escort her.

Around 1815A/18, the Exilona was detached to the Clyde as ordered by the C-in-C Western Approaches.

During the night of 18/19 August 1943, the Highwear developed engine trouble and then detached from the convoy to return to the U.K.

Around 0015A/21, HMS Wanderer was detached to search for a missing aircraft as ordered in the C-in-C Western Approaches signal timed 2323A/20. She rejoined the convoy around 1925A/21 having seen nothing.

On 22 August 1943, HMS Hurricane and HMS Wanderer fuelled from the escort oiler Scottish American.

On 22 August 1943, HMS Wallfolower fuelled from the escort oiler Scottish American.

At 0320A/25, HMS Wanderer obtained a small radar echo on her port bow at a range of 14000 yards. She then proceeded to close this contact at 20 knots. Her contact faded at a range of 3800 yards. Asdic contact was then gained and a depth charge attack was carried out. HMS Wallflower was then ordered to join her in the A/S hunt. Meanwhile HMS Wanderer carried out another depth charge attack after which contact was lost. Later HMS Wanderer and HMS Wallflower regained contact after which HMS Wallflower carried out two depth charge attacks. Contact was then again lost. About an hour later HMS Wanderer again regained contact and carried out a Hedgehog attack. One explosion was heard. This was followed ten minutes later by a depth charge attack by HMS Wanderer and seven minutes later the U-boat surfaced. HMS Wanderer and HMS Wallflower opened fire and hits were obtained. The U-boat then sank and thirty-seven survivors, including the Commanding Officer, were then picked up. Four of these were seriously wounded and were subsequently transferred to the Zamalek. Fifteen others were transferred by HMS Wallflower to HMS Hurricane.

On 26 August 1943, HMS Wanderer, HMS Cygnet and HMS Hydrangea fuelled from the escort oiler Scottish American.

Around 2100A/28, the following merchant vessels were detached from the convoy to proceed to Lisbon; Empire Mortimer, Empire Rhodes, Empire Service, Empire Wolfe, Flaminian, Fort Coulonge, Leonardia, Lightfoot, Ocean Angel and Skeldergate. They were escorted by HMS Cygnet, HMS Wanderer and HMS Wallflower. They arrived at Lisbon on the 29th.

Around 05305A/30, in position 36°01'N, 05°23'W the following merchant vessels were detached to Gibraltar (where convoy OG 92 ended); Bactria, City of Lancaster, Empire Spey, Fort Fidler, Fort Thompson, Lom, Mers el Kebir and PLM 13. Also detached were the Scottish American, Zamalek. They were escorted by HMS Hydrangea and HMS Monkshood. They arrived at Gibraltar later the same day.

Around 0800A/30, in position 36°14'N, 04°30'W the following merchant vessels joined the convoy coming from Gibraltar; Charles M. Conrad (American, 7181 GRT, built 1942), Elihu Yale (American, 7176 GRT, built 1942), Hallfried (Norwegian, 2968 GRT, built 1918), Louisa M. Alcott (American, 7176 GRT, built 1943), Lublin (Polish, 1409 GRT, built 1932) and Solomon Juneau (American, 7176 GRT, built 1943). Also joining from Gibraltar were the tugs Weazel, Empire Griffin and the boom defence vessel HMS Barndale (T/Lt. R.L. Jones, RNR). Also the light (AA) cruiser HMS Delhi (Capt. A.T.G.C. Peachey, RN) and corvettes HMS Bergamot (Lt. R.T. Horan, RNR), HMS Bryony (T/Lt. T. Hand, RNR), HMS Camellia (T/Lt. R.F.J. Maberley, RNVR), HMS La Malouine (Lt. W.A. Ives, RNR) and the patrol vessel RHS Vasilefs Georgios II joined. HMS Borage and HMS Dahlia then parted company to proceed to Gibraltar.

At 1055A/30, HMS Hurricane parted company to proceed to Gibraltar.

In the afternoon the corvette HMS Bluebell (Lt. G.H. Walker, RNVR) overtook and joined the convoy after having been delayed due to defects.

Around 0930B/31, the following merchant vessels joined the convoy off Oran; Chelma (French, 4968 GRT, built 1920), Lorraine (French (tanker), 9512 GRT, built 1937), Tintern Abbey (British, 2471 GRT, built 1939), Ulla (British, 1575 GRT, built 1930) and Ville de Bougie (French, 1237 GRT, built 1907). Lorraine however almost immediately returned to Oran.

At 0915B/1, the following merchant vessels were detached to Algiers; Auk, Chelma, Elihu Yale, Louisa M. Alcott, Hallfried, Lublin, Solomon Juneau, Zaanstroom. The tugs HMS Weazel and Empire Griffin were also detached.

At the same time the following merchant vessels joined the convoy coming from Algiers; British Character (British (tanker), 8453 GRT, built 1941), Crackshot (British, 2379 GRT, built 1924), Empire Dace (British (ferry), 716 GRT, built 1942), Fort la Traite (British, 7134 GRT, built 1942), Fort Pitt (British, 7133 GRT, built 1942), Gallium (French, 1775 GRT, built 1924), Prosper Schiaffino (French, 1634 GRT, built 1931), Spero (Norwegian, 3619 GRT, built 1919) and Ville de Djidjelli (French, 1132 GRT, built 1907). Also joining was the submarine HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN).

During the night of 1/2 September 1943, the Empire Dace, Ville de Bougie and Ville de Djidjelli were detached to Bougie while two merchant vessels joined the convoy coming from Bougie, these were the; Alcinous (Dutch, 6189 GRT, built 1925) and Prometheus (British, 6095 GRT, built 1925).

Around 1330B/2, the merchant vessel British Character parted company off Philippeville while the following merchant vessels joined the convoy; Chloris (British, 1171 GRT, built 1910) and Portsea (British, 1583 GRT, 1938).

At 2000B/2, the merchant vessels Baron Semple, Fort Glenora and Langleebrook parted company off Bone while the following merchant vessels joined the convoy coming from Bone; British Purpose (British (tanker), 5845 GRT, built 1943), Como (British, 1295 GRT, built 1910), Odysseus (Dutch, 1057 GRT, 1922), Ousel (British, 1533 GRT, built 1922) and Selvik (Norwegian, 1557 GRT, built 1920).

At 0900B/3, the following merchant ships parted company off Bizerta; Alcinous, Como, Ousel, Prometheus, Tintern Abbey and Ulla. The following merchant vessels joined the convoy coming from Bizerta, these were the; A.C. Bedford (British (tanker), 9485 GRT, built 1918), Badarpur (British, 8079 GRT, built 1922), Eildon (British, 1447 GRT, built 1936), Empire Opal (British (tanker), 9811 GRT, built 1941), Empire Thackeray (British, 2865 GRT, built 1942). Also joining the convoy was the boom defence vessel HMS Barmond (T/Lt. L.J. Essery, RNR), the gasoline tanker USS Aroostook and the self propelled fuel barge USS Anticline.

At 1330B/3, the following ships were detached to Tunis, Eildon, Prosper Schiaffino, USS Aroostook and USS Anticline.

Around 1800B/3, the Selvik parted company to proceed to Sfax.

Around 1330B/4, in position 35.10'N, 13.30'E the following merchant vessels were detached to Malta; Crackshot, Empire Thackeray, Gallium, Odysseus and Spero. Also detached were HMS Delhi, HMS Bergamot, HMS Barmond and HMS Barndale. Joining from Malta were the following merchant vessels; Afghanistan (British, 6992 GRT, built 1940), Clan Murdoch (British, 5950 GRT, built 1919), Debrett (British, 6244 GRT, built 1940), Empire Kamal (British, 7862 GRT, built 1938), Empire Patrol (British, 3334 GRT, built 1928), Fort Lajoie (British, 7134 GRT, built 1942), Highland Prince (British, 7043 GRT, built 1942), Neuralia (British, 9182 GRT, built 1912), President de Vogue (Norwegian (tanker), 9320 GRT, built 1935) and Suiyang (British, 2590 GRT, built 1917). With these ships the escort destroyer HMS Rockwood (Lt. S.R. Le H. Lombard-Hobson, RN) and the A/S whaler HMSAS Southern Maid also joined.

At the same time these ships were detached and joined from Malta the Augusta / Syracusa portion of the convoy parted company. They were to proceed to their destination via Malta. It was made up of the following merchant vessels; Chloris, Conakrian, Empire Snow, Empire Summer, Manchester Exporter and Portsea.

Around 1100C/5, in position 34°26'N, 17°05'E, HMS Tally-Ho parted company to proceed independently to Port Said.

Around 1200C/6, in position 33°07'N, 20°52'E, the merchant vessel Sofala (British, 1031 GRT, built 1937) joined the convoy coming from Benghazi.

Around 1215C/6, in position 33°08'N, 20°53'E, HMSAS Southern Maid parted company to proceed to Benghazi.

Around 1130C/7, the merchant vessels Kwai Sang (British, 2320 GRT, built 1917) and Lee Sang (British, 1655 GRT, built 1907) joined the convoy coming from Tobruk.

Around 0745C/9, the following merchant vessel were detached to Alexandria; Cape Brenton, City of Hongkong, City of Lille, Clan Murdoch, Empire Kamal, Fort la Traite, Fort Lajoie, Kwai Sang, Neuralia, Sofala and Suiyang. Also detached were HMS Rockwood, HMS Camellia, HMS La Malouine and RHS Vasilefs Georgios II.

Around 0630C/9, the sloop HMIS Sutlej ( A/Cdr. A.H. Watt, RIN) joined in position 31°20'N, 29°39'E.

The remainder of the convoy arrived at Port Said on 10 September 1943. (8)

20 Aug 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) makes a torpedo attack on two small merchant vessels south of Toulon, France in position in position 43°02'N, 05°52'E. No hits were obtained.

According to German sources this was convoy '5098' and was made up of the French passenger vessels Ville de Bastia (1336 GRT, built 1920) and Ville d'Ajaccio (2444 GRT, built 1929). They were escorted by the auxiliary patrol vessels UJ 6071 and Fla 14. They merchant vessels had departed Ajaccio at 0550B/20 for Marseilles where they arrived around 1805B/20. On departure from Ajaccio they were escorted by the auxiliary minesweepers M 7606 and M 7607 but these were relieved at 1210B/20.

1338B/20 - Sighted two small motor vessels.

1349B/20 - Commenced attack.

1412B/20 - Fired two torpedoes. Went to 200 feet.

1420B/20 - Heard one loud bang.

[No further details are known from the British side as there is no patrol report only the ships log.] (5)

22 Aug 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) makes a torpedo attack on two ships to the south-east near Toulon, France in approximate position 42°55'N, 06°18'E. No hits were obtained.

According to German sources the ships attacked were the German auxiliary minelayers Pommern and Brandenburg that were en-route from La Spezia to Toulon.

1215B/22 - Sighted two ships. Started attack.

1233B/22 - Fired three torpedoes and went to 200 feet. About 10 minutes later three explosions were heard, most likely en of run explosions of the torpedoes.

[No further details from the British side are known as there is no patrol report only the ships log.] (5)

27 Aug 1943
Around 2215B/27, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) left patrol to proceed to Algiers. (5)

30 Aug 1943
Around 0830B/30, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) ended her 3rd war patrol (1st in the Mediterranean) at Algiers.

She was escorted in by the M/S trawler HMS Unst (T/Lt. F.M. Cornall, RNVR) which had joined at 0605B/30. (5)

1 Sep 1943
Around 0920B/1, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) departed from Algiers bound for Port Said.

She made part of the passage in convoy KMS 24.

[For more info on this convoy see the event ' Combined convoy OG 92 / KMS 24 ' for 18 August 1943.]

For the daily positions of HMS Tally-Ho during this passage see the map below.

(9)

9 Sep 1943
Around 0720C/9, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) arrived at Port Said from Algiers. (9)

11 Sep 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) is docked at Port Said. (10)

15 Sep 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) is undocked. (9)

26 Sep 1943
Around 0550C/26, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) departed Port Said bound for Aden. (9)

2 Oct 1943
Around 1620C/2, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) arrived at Aden from Port Said. (11)

5 Oct 1943
Around 1200C/5, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) departed Aden for Colombo. On departure she conducted A/S exercises with HMS Relentless (Lt.Cdr. R.A. Fell, RN). (12)

14 Oct 1943
Around 1330FG/14, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) arrived at Colombo from Aden. On arrival she made two runs over the D/G range. (12)

26 Oct 1943
Around 1745FG/26, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) departed from Colombo for her 4th war patrol (1st in the far east). She was ordered to patrol in the Malacca Straits.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tally-Ho during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

5 Nov 1943
Around 0514FG/5, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) dived to the east-north-east of Penang in position 05°31'N, 100°00'E and patrolled near that position all day. A small Japanse submarine chaser was seen to be patrolling of the northern entrance to Penang during the entire day. On one occasion she stopped about 600 yards from HMS Tally Ho but she failed to make contact.

At 1735FG/5, when HMS Tally-Ho was in position 05°28'N, 100°00'E, a small object which looked like a U-boat was sighted close inshore. HMS Tally-Ho altered course to close the coast at full speed. It was rapidly getting dark and, although the vessel closely resembled a U-boat, the Asdic operator reported a reciprocating engine.

The enemy's course appeared to be about 165° but by 1758FG/5 it was too dark to obtain estimations through the periscope. Also water noises inshore were very strong and the Asdic operator had difficulty in holding the target. By 1800FG/5, the target had crossed the bow from port to starboard and was slowly proceeding down the coast along the ten fathom line.

At 1805FG/5, HMS Tally-Ho surfaced and altered coourse to 165° to close the enemy. The small submarine chaser could just be seen to the northward.

At 1815FG/5, HMS Tally-Ho was almost astern of the target and was closing rapidly. The target altered course shortly afterwards and was then seen to be a large trawler. With the submarine chaser to the north and now a trawler to the south Lt.Cdr. Bennington turned away towards deeper water and subsequently retired to the southern part of the area. (3)

6 Nov 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) fires five torpedoes at a German U-boat that was seen leaving Penang. Position of the attack was 05°27'N, 100°04'E.

The target was German U-boat U-178 that departed Penang bound for Singapore that day escorted by the tender Quito (1230 GRT, built 1938, offsite link). The attack was observed on board the U-Boat. The Germans gave the position of the attack as 05°25.5'N, 100°05.5'E.

1620FG/6 - Sighted a merchant ship (1500-2000 tons) steering to the southward. Tally-Ho went to full submerged speed. But by 1702 hours the attack was broken off as it was impossible to reach an attack position.

1714FG/6 - Sighted a German U-boat that had just left the harbour. Tally-Ho closed the target at full speed. The U-boat had a speed of only 3 knots.

1730FG/6 - Fired 5 torpedoes from 1000 yards. One torpedo malfunctioned and ran down the port side. The others missed. About 4 minutes after firing a puff of smoke was sighted and the U-boat increased speed to 11 knots.

1805FG/6 - Tally-Ho surfaced and gave chase hoping to intercept the U-boat and small merchant ship but at 1912 hours a submarine chaser was sighted and had to be avoided spoiling the effort of catching up with the U-boat and small merchant. (13)

8 Nov 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) is depth charged by a Japanese submarine chaser off Penang. In all 14 depth charges were dropped. No serious damage was done but it prevented Tally-Ho from attacking a merchant ship.

Later on the same day Tally-Ho attacks but missed a merchant ship in position 05°26.5'N, 100°06.5'E.

While on patrol off Penang heavy Japanese A/S activity is noticed.

1100FG/8 - A submarine chaser, which had been seen earlier, is now 1000 yards on the Port beam of Tally-Ho. A little later it moved further inshore. Shortly before 1200 hours it moved closer and stopped about 300 to 400 yards on the Port quarter of Tally-Ho. It was now obvious that a submarines presence was suspected by the Japanese.

1205FG/8 - The submarine chaser moved towards. Went to 70 feet and proceeded at slow speed on both motors.

1215FG/8 - The enemy submarine chaser dropped eight depth charges in two patterns of four. The first pattern was rather close and damaged the depth gauge.

1225FG/8 - Two more patterns of three depth charges each were dropped between 1225 and 1258 hours.

1236FG/8 - Came to periscope depth. Saw the submarine chaser now laying stopped 3000 yards astern.

1345FG/8 - Sighted a floatplane several miles to the South. It was felt that this heralded the approach of a target.

1350FG/8 - In position 05°30'N, 100°01'E, masts of a large ship were now sighted bearing 170°. The ship was steering 360° and was close inshore. Unfortunately the patrolling submarine chaser had forced Tally-Ho more to the seaward then intended and with the submarine chaser now also to the South this prevented Tally-Ho from closing the target at high speed. Started attack none the less but it was not possible to reach a favourable attack position so the attack was reluctantly broken off.

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1455FG/8 - While in position 05°29N, 100°03E sighted masts of a merchant ship bearing 085°. The enemy's course was estimated to be 235°. Altered speed and course to attack.

1506FG/8 - Range was 7000 yards. Enemy speed 7 knots. Increased to full speed for 6 minutes.

1521FG/8 - Range was now 2250 yards. Enemy speed still 7 knots.

1526FG/8 - In position 05°26.5'N, 100°06.5'E Fired two torpedoes set to 8 feet. Range was 700 yards. Both torpedoes missed. One was seen to run wild. Retired to the South-East. (3)

10 Nov 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) torpedoed and sank the Japanese water carrier Kisogawa Maru (1914 GRT, built 1940) (offsite link) south-west of Langkawi in position 06°11'N, 99°35'E.

0525FG/10 - Dived in position 06°10'N, 99°30'E and shortly afterwards sighted smoke fine on the port bow. Several minutes elapsed before the vessel could be seen.

0555FG/10 - Commenced attack on 5000 tons merchant vessel steering 304° at 11 knots.

0626FG/10 - In position 06°11'N, 99°35'E fired five torpedoes from 2600 yards.

0628FG/10 - A tremendous explosion was seen to blow the enemy to pieces. A torpedo was seen to run wild forcing Tally-Ho deep.

0629FG/10 - Surfaced and vacated the area at speed. An oil fire was seen to burn on the surface for over two hours. Most likely, at least part of, the cargo of the ship must have been benzene or aviation spirit.

0635FG/10 - Sighted a patrol vessel approaching the fire from the east.

0647FG/10 - Dived and retired to the south-east. (3)

11 Nov 1943
At midnight during the night of 11/12 November 1943, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) left patrol to return to Colombo. (3)

12 Nov 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) has two encounters with what are thought to be enemy submarines in the northern end of the Malacca Straits. Unfortunately Tally-Ho is not able to attack either.

It is however likely that the first 'submarine' sighted was not a submarine after all.

The second submarine sighted, which was thought to be a large Japanese submarine was most likely the I-166 (offsite link) which arrived at Penang the next day from patrol in the Indian Ocean.

0109FG/12 - While in position 05°30'N, 98°42'E a dim object was sighted on the port bow. Altered course towards. The object appeared to be large and a long way away.

0118FG/12 - The range had now decreased to 6000 yards. It could now be seen that the contact was a ship. It looked like 'a cross Channel steamer of the Canterbury-class'. A minute later a smaller object was sighted astern. This was thought to be a submarine following the ship.

0120FG/12 - While Tally-Ho was trying to get into an attack position the ship challenged with an ordinary Aldis lamp. The challenge was 'G', followed by 'XE' and then 'MR'. Tally-Ho altered course away and increased speed. The ship was now seen to give chase.

0125FG/12 - Dived to 200 feet and altered course to 350°. Seven minutes later the enemy dropped a pattern of 4 depth charges.

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1440FG/12 - Sighted 'something' fine on the port bow. Dived to periscope depth.

1446FG/12 - In approximate position 06°00'S, 97°00'E, sighted submarine bearing 294° at maximum range. Started attack.

1516FG/12 - Broke off attack as we could not close to attack range. The target was thought to be a large Japanese submarine. (3)

17 Nov 1943
Around 1130FG/17, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) ended her 4th war patrol at Colombo. (3)

19 Nov 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) is docked at Colombo. (14)

21 Nov 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) left dock at Colombo. (14)

3 Dec 1943
Around 1200FG/3, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) departed from Colombo for her 5th war patrol (2nd in the far east). She was ordered to patrol in the Malacca Straits and to perform a special operation (Gustavus VI). On departure from harbour D/F calibration trials were carried out.

For the daily positions of HMS Tally-Ho during this patrol see the map below.

(15)

7 Dec 1943
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) develops problems with one of her periscopes. Repairs are attempted (also during the following days) but to no avail. None the less the patrol is continued. (3)

9 Dec 1943
From 9 to 11 December 1943, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) performs special operation Gustavus VI).

Repairs to the defective periscope were still unsuccessful. Lt.Cdr. Bennington therefore decided to abandon the patrol on completion of the special operation and to proceed to Trincomalee for repairs.

Tally-Ho arrived at the first rendezvous position shortly after midday on 9 December and patrolled between Pulau Jarak and a position 4 nautical miles due south of the island.

Two junks were sighted but neither was flying the correct signal. After dark the area was searched for three hours for no results.

From noon until dark on the 10th, Tally-Ho patrolled in the vicinity of the second rendezvous position to the south-west of Sembilan Islands. One junk sailing to the westward was examined at close range and the beaches of Pulau Lalang were also inspected but nothing was observed.

The third day (11 December) was also spent in the vicinity of Pulau Lalang but again nothing was sighted. Under cover of darkness, Captain Harrison, 5th Gurkha Regiment and one Chinese special agent were landed by Folbot to examine the 'postbox'. On their return they reported they had searched in the correct position but could not locate the 'postbox'. Tally-Ho then withdrew to the north-west. (15)

13 Dec 1943
At 1336FG/13, south-west of Great Nicobar Island, in position 06°14'N, 92°58'E, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) sighted the masts of a vessel. HMS Tally-Ho then dived and altered course to close. It was soon apparent that the vessel was quite small and from its outline it was first thought to be a yacht of about 200 tons. It was thought possible that this vessel was waiting to escort an enemy submarine into Sabang. HMS Tally-Ho then patrolled in the vicinity but later in the afternoon it was observed that the vessel was only a fishing trawler of less then 100 tons.

At 1842FG/13, HMS Tally-Ho surfaced in position 06°13'N, 92°50'E and resumed her passage to Trincomalee. (3)

16 Dec 1943
Around 1345FG/16, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) ended her 5th war patrol at Trincomalee.

She had made rendezvous with a trawler (identity not given in the log) at 0523FG/16 which then escorted her in. (3)

28 Dec 1943
Around 1630FG/28, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) departed from Trincomalee for her 6th war patrol (3rd in the far east). She was ordered to perform two special operations ('Emergency Gustavus VI' and 'Mud'), followed by a patrol in the Malacca Straits and later of the Nicobar Islands.

She departed Trincomalee together with HMS Templar (Lt. D.J. Beckley, DSO, RN). The submarines were escorted out by HMS Lord Grey (T/Lt. J.J. Challis, RNVR) until around 2200FG/28. (15)

28 Dec 1943
For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tally-Ho during her 6th patrol see the map below.

3 Jan 1944
From 3 to 5 January 1944, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) performed special operations 'Emergency Gustavus VI' and 'Mud'.

On 3 January 1944, Tally-Ho conducted a periscope reconnaissance of the Malayan coast close north of the Sembilan Islands.

The most suitable rendezvous between a junk and a submarine was considered to be in position 04°23'N, 100°25'E. This position is 10 nautical miles from the entrance to the Dinding River and is considered safe from the submarines point of view.

On 4 January 1944, a similar reconnaissance was conducted to the south of the Sembilan Islands. Position 03°52'N, 100° 39'E was consided to be an excellent rendezvous position.

On 5 January 1944, HMS Tally-Ho patrolled near the rendezvous for the Gustavus VI party to the south of Pulau Jarak. A junk was sighted at anchor one mile south of the island. It was seen to display the correct identification signal.

Contact was made after dark. The Gustavus party in Malaya considered it too dangerous to land either personnel or stores. So for the second time in succession HMS Tally-Ho had to bring back the team of 'Gustavus VI' and their stores with her to Ceylon. It was also considered not wise then to go ahead and land the 'Mud' party.

HMS Tally-Ho then set course to the northward to continue with her regular patrol. (15)

9 Jan 1944
At 0552FG/9, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) dived in position 05°37'N, 99°56'E.

At 0900FG/9, masts of a ship were sighted bearing 230°. Course was altered and speed was increased to close submerged. After three minutes the tops of three funnels were visible and the vessel was identified as a Japanese Kuma-class light cruiser. For five minutes the bearing remained steady. Tally-Ho continued to close at full speed.

At 0915FG/9, the cruiser was observed to be turning in circles to port in approximate position 05°28'N, 99°58'E. It was thought man overboard exercises were being carried out.

At 0920FG/9, the enemy increased speed and made off to the westward. Tally-Ho was still outside torpedo range.

The remainder of the day was spent patrolling near the north entrance in the hope the cruiser would return to Penang.

At 1800FG/9, when Tally-Ho was in position 05°33'N, 100°02'E, a cruiser and destroyer were sighted bearing 230° at a range of approximately five nautical miles. HE had been reported about two minutes earlier. Both enemy vessels were zig-zagging. Their mean course appeared to be about 090°. Course was altered to close and speed was increased to full speed submerged. It was rapidly getting darker and the enemy was increasingly difficult to see against the land background. Also water noises from the shore interfered with with the enemy's HE. It was still too light to surface as the submarine would have been silhoutted against the western sky. Therefore the attack was reluctantly abandoned.

At 1900FG/9, HMS Tally-Ho surfaced in position 05°32'N, 100°00'E and moved away from the coast.

The cruiser and the destroyer sighted were the Japanese Kuma and Uranami (offsite links) which had been at sea to serve as targets for enemy aircraft during exercises. (3)

11 Jan 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) torpedoed and sank the Japanese light cruiser Kuma (offsite link) about 10 nautical miles north-west of Penang, Malaya in position 05°26'N, 99°52'E. Kuma was escorted by the destroyer Uranami which depth charged Tally Ho following the attack.

0815FG/11 - Sighted a floatplane flying westwards along the route which the cruiser that had been sighted on the 9th was to be expected. It was felt that this heralded the approach of the cruiser. Just before 0900 hours the Officer of the Watch sighted the masts of the cruiser fine on the Port bow. The enemy was seen steering 294° and had a destroyer as escort. Commenced attack. Position was 05°34'N, 100°03'E.

0913FG/11 - Fired seven torpedoes from 1900 yards. Two hits were obtained. Altered course and went to 80 feet. The destroyer counter attacked with 18 depth charges.

1013FG/11 - Returned to periscope depth. There was no sign of the cruiser. The destroyer was still searching some distance astern. Lt.Cdr. Bennington was under the impression that the cruiser had sunk. He also decided that enemy A/S vessels were expected to search to seaward so he considered it wise to proceed to the Penang southern entrance while at 80 feet, remaining close to the 10 fathom line.

1130FG/11 - Returned to periscope depth. There was no sign of the cruiser and destroyer but two or three aircraft were seen patrolling near the area of the attack. Tally-Ho then went to 60 feet and continued her passage to patrol off the southern entrance to Penang.

1340FG/11 - Returned to periscope depth. Thick puffs of black smoke were sighted close to the position of the attack. This smoke was subsequently seen in this position until 1745FG/11. It was thought this might be burning fuel from the cruiser.

1545FG/11 - Tally-Ho arrived off the southern entrance. Around 1715FG/11 a trawler was seen leaving through the southern entrance. Aircraft had been in sight for most of the afternoon.

1834FG/11 - Surfaced in position 05°07'N, 99°58'E and set course to the south-west.

2310FG/11 - In position 04°30'N, 99°32'E course was altered to the north-west.

Shortly before midnight, a dark object, similar in outline to a submarine chaser was sighted to port. The contact was evaded. Very shortly afterwards a second submarine chaser was seen to starboard.

Shortly after midnight Tally-Ho altered course twice but the enemy was seen to follow and increase speed. The enemy could not be shaken off.

0037FG/12 - Dived to 100 feet in position 04°39'N, 99°06'E and altered course to 120°. A few minutes later the enemy attacked with six depth charges.

0057FG/12 - Course was altered to 090°.

0410FG/12 - Course was altered to 320°. It was thought both submarine chasers were still in the vicinity, laying stopped or proceeding at dead slow speed. It was decided not to surface until first light.

0552FG/12 - Surfaced in position 04°43'N, 98°56'E after nothing had been sighted.

(3)

12 Jan 1944
At 0904FG/12, in position 05°10'N, 98°54'E, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) is bombed by a Japanese floatplane. Two bombs were dropped and some minor damage was sustained. HMS Tally-Ho had set a signal not long before and it was thought she might have been D/F'd by the enemy. (3)

15 Jan 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) torpedoed and sank the sank Japanese army cargo ship Ryuko Maru (2963 GRT, built 1936) (offsite link) south of Port Blair, Andaman Islands in position 10°03'N, 93°05'E.

The Japanese ship was escorted by the minesweeper W 7 (offsite link)

1435FG/14 - While patrolling of Sawai Bay, Car Nicobar Island, sighted a medium sized merchant vessel entering the bay from the north-eastward. At that moment Tally-Ho was out of torpedo range to the westward.

Altered course to close the anchorage with the intention to attack the enemy ship after it had anchored. But in fact the enemy ship did not do so as after entering the bay they turned and made off on a course of 047°. A fairly short sea was running at the time and it was probably too rough to anchor. HMS Tally-Ho altered course to 070° to intercept but the enemy crossed the bow well outside torpedo range. Tally-Ho then went to 50 feet and increased to full submerged speed to give chase. The enemy was a coal buring ship looking like the Johore Maru (approx. 6000 GRT)

1600FG/14 - Periscope observation showed that the enemy had altered course to 010° and that it was almost out of sight. Tally-Ho altered course to 020° and continued to pursue the enemy at the best possible submerged speed. Funnel smoke was in sight until 1740FG/14.

1807FG/14 - Nothing could be seen of the enemy. Also no aircraft were seen and despite the vicinity of Car Nicobar Island Tally-Ho surfaced to try to establish contact before dark with the object to close and attack from submerged at moonrise (2118FG/14). So surfaced in position 09°29'N, 92°41'E.

1935FG/14 - Altered course to 015°. The destination of the enemy ship was most likely to be Port Blair.

2030FG/14 - Sighted smoke about 5° on the starboard bow. Decreased speed to 12 knots. Shortly afterwards radar obtained a good range of 10000 yards and a range plot was started.

2100FG/14 - By now both the merchant ship and the escort were in sight ahead of the submarine. Their course was still 010° and the radar plot gave a speed of 9 to 10 knots.

2115FG/14 - Tally-Ho altered course to 300° and increased speed to 14 knots. After running for 5 nautical miles Tally-Ho turned to 010° and ran parallel to the enemy. Meanwhile the moon started to rise behind the enemy.

2358FG/14 - The enemy was just in sight bearing 140°. Tally-Ho altered course to 040° to close the track.

0025FG/15 - Tally-Ho altered course to 055° and increased speed to 15 knots to close the enemy's line of advance more rapidly as the visibility was decreasing gradually.

0031FG/15 - The moon, which had been slightly obscured by thin white cloud broke through and the visibility improved at once. Tally-Ho was forced to dive to avoid being sighted. This resulted in an attack from longer range than had been intended. Course was altered to 100° and started the attack.

0054FG/15 - In position 10°03'N, 93°05'E fired six torpedoes from 5000 to 6000 yards. One hit was obtained. Went to 300 feet after firing.

0158FG/15 - Came to periscope depth. Found nothing in sight.

0225FG/15 - Surfaced in position 10°40'N, 93°00'E. Set course to the south to charge which was urgently required and then patrol between Little Andaman and Car Nicobar Islands and after dark leave patrol to return to Trincomalee. (3)

18 Jan 1944
At 1130FG/18, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) ended her 6th war patrol at Trincomalee.

She was escorted in by the Italian sloop Eritrea which had joined at 0700FG/18. (3)

3 Feb 1944
Around 0800FG/3, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) departed from Trincomalee for her 7th war patrol (4th in the far east). She was ordered to perform patrol in the Malacca Straits. She is also to perform a special operations (Remarkable I).

On departure HMS Tally-Ho conducted gunnery exercises and A/S exercises with the destroyers HMS Racehorse (Cdr. J.J. Casement, DSC, RN) and HMS Rocket (Lt.Cdr. H.B. Acworth, OBE, RN). (3)

3 Feb 1944
For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tally-Ho during her 7th war patrol see the map below.

13 Feb 1944
At 1951FG/13, in approximate position 03°50'N, 100°07'E, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) sighed an object fine on the starboard bow. Visibility was poor. HMS Tally-Ho dived to 80 feet.

Fore some time no HE was heard and it was thought that possibly the object had been the island of Pulau Jarak.

Shortly after 2030FG/13, when HMS Tally-Ho was about to surface HE was reported on the starboard side. It persisted for about an hour and finally disappeared astern. It was thought the HE emanated from a patrol vessel, possibly a submarine chaser. (3)

15 Feb 1944
German U-boat UIT-23 was sunk in the Straits of Malacca south of Penang, in position 04°27'N, 100°11'E, by torpedoes from the British submarine HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN).

The German (former Italian) submarine was en-route from Singapore to Penang. There were 26 dead. 14 survivors were picked up by German Arado floatplanes.

0515FG/15 - While in position 04°25'N, 100°09'E sighted an object fine on the Starboard bow bearing 135°. Changed course and reduced speed. About a minute later the object disappeared from view.

0519FG/15 - The object re-appeared ahead of Tally-Ho and was identified as a large submarine, probably Japanese. The enemy's estimated course was 360°, speed 14 knots, range was 3000/3500 yards. Started attack. While getting into attack position another object was sighted thought to be another submarine broad on the Port bow (this later turned out to be a junk).

0522FG/15 - Fired three torpedoes against the first submarine. 2 min 25 sec after firing the third torpedo an torpedo explosion was heard. HE stopped almost immediately. A few minutes later periscope observation showed nothing in sight. It is considered that the submarine had sunk. (3)

17 Feb 1944
From 17 to 19 February 1944, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) carried out 'Ceylon Submarine Operation Order No.20' for 'Operation Remarkable I'.

During these days HMS Tally-Ho patrolled to the south of Pulau Jarak from dusk till dawn on each of these three days. There was however no sign of the junk they were to make rendezvous with. (15)

18 Feb 1944
At 1345FG/18, off the Sembilan Islands, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) sighted what were thought to be a northbound 2000 tons merchant ship and escorting minelayer passing through positions;
A) 03°59'N, 100°33'E.
B) 04°01'N, 100°35'E.
C) 03°52'N, 100°40'E.

A little later what were though to be a southbound Japanese seaplane tender and another escorting minelayer were sighted passing through more or less the same positions.

HMS Tally-Ho at that moment was engaged in a special operation and was not allowed to attack, to the disgust of Lt.Cdr. Bennington. (3)

21 Feb 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) torpedoed and sank the Japanese army cargo ship Daigen Maru No.6 (510 GRT, built 1935) in the Strait of Malacca in position 03°52'N, 100°40'E.

1410FG/21 - Sighted a merchant ship approaching from the south-east. Commenced attack. The vessel was judged to be about 2000/2500 tons. It was steering 304° at an estimated speed of 7 knots, range was 8000 yards.

1447FG/21 - In position 03°52'N, 100°40'E fired 5 torpedoes from 1300 yards. There was one hit and the ship sank in 4 minutes. Tally-Ho retired to the south-east. (3)

24 Feb 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) is rammed by the Japanese torpedo boat Kari (offsite link) in the Malacca Straits in position 03°42'N, 100°09'E. Tally-Ho is heavily damaged but managed to escape.

0251FG/24 - The Officer of the Watch Lt. P.D.C. Bennett, RN reported two wakes ahead of the submarine crossing the bow from port to starboard, true bearing 358°. Lt.Cdr. Bennington, who was asleep on the bridge, stood up to look. The night was pitch dark and a great many phosphorescent wakes from large fish had been sighted. Lt. Bennett was of the opinion that the two wakes he sighted were larger. Before Lt.Cdr. Bennington could see the two wakes Lt. Bennett reported that he now could see only one. A moment later he again sighted both wakes and this time reported that the direction had changed and that both wakes were now moving from Starboard to Port. It soon became apparent that the wakes belonged to a vessel that was very close to Tally-Ho and that it was moving at speed. A challenge was made as it was thought possible that it was either HMS Tactician or HMS Truculent. Suddenly the enemy charged in from the starboard quarter and started dropping depth charges.

Lt.Cdr. Bennington decided not to dive as it would make Tally-Ho a perfect target for ramming and depth charging. The wheel was put hard a Port. The enemy crossed the stern from starboard to port and attempted to ram from the side. The wheel was now put hard a Starboard and the enemy tore along the Port side, ripping open the port main ballast tanks, still dropping depth charges and firing a gun. Position was 03°42'N, 100°09'E.

The collision caused Tally-Ho to take a very heavy list to Port. Despite this Tally-Ho dived to 120 feet without much trouble as soon as the enemy was clear. In all probability the enemy was also damaged (this proved to be correct). Only two more depth charges were dropped, although the enemy remained in the vicinity, apparently proceeding at slow speed for over an hour. It was thought to be a torpedo boat of the Hayabusa-class (this was also a correct assumption).

0547FG/24 - Altered course to 300° and started to make for Trincomalee. The forward hydroplanes had also been damaged, but Tally-Ho was kept at quite a steady depth without them.

0630FG/24 - Came to periscope depth. A torpedo boat of destroyer was seen searching on the starboard quarter. Went to 80 feet. HE from the enemy was heard for an hour and a half but at no time it came close.

1825FG/24 - Surfaced in position 03°58'N, 99°39'E. Upon surfacing the list was about 15°. It proved possible to reduce the list to 12°. It could be seen that all the port ballast tanks were heavily damaged. Speed was limited to 9.5 knots.

2204FG/24 - Sighted an object fine on the Starboard bow. Changed course to 295°. It was thought to be a patrol vessel but it gradually faded.

The next day the list was reduced to 8° while Tally-Ho proceeded to Trincomalee. (3)

1 Mar 1944
Around 1415FG/1, the heavily damaged and listing HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) ended her 7th war patrol at Trincomalee. (3)

4 Mar 1944
Around 1730FG/4, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) departed from to Colombo for repairs. She is escorted by the Italian sloop Eritrea. (16)

6 Mar 1944
Around 0815FG/6, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) arrived at Colombo. (16)

7 Mar 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN) is docked at Colombo.

The damage to the ballast tank due to the ramming by the Japanese torpedo boat Kari is clearly visible in this photograph of HMS Tally-Ho in the dock.

(16)

27 Apr 1944
With her repairs completed HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC, RN) is undocked. (17)

29 Apr 1944
Around 1715FG/29, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC, RN) departed from Colombo bound for Trincomalee. She is escorted by the Italian sloop Eritrea.

Shortly before departure D/G trials were carried out. (17)

1 May 1944
Around 0920FG/1, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC, RN) arrived at Trincomalee from Colombo. (17)

9 May 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC, RN) departed from Trincomalee for her 8th war patrol. She is to patrol in the Malacca Straits. She is also to perform a mine laying mission.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tally-Ho during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

14 May 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC, RN) lays mines in the Strait of Malacca near Medan, Sumatra in position 03°42'N, 99°04'E.

1634FG/14 - Tally-Ho was now about three-quarters of a mile due North of position 03°42'N, 99°04'E. Commenced mine laying. The first line of four mines was laid on course of 240° and the spacing was one cable. The depth of the water at the beginning of the line was 9 fathoms and at the end 7.5 fathoms.

On completion altered course to 170° and proceeded three cables into this direction. Then bottomed to reload. The next four mines were also laid one cable apart, on a course of 170° and commenced from the bottoming position. The depth of the water was 7 to 7.5 fathoms.

After the second lay course was altered to 080°. Tally-Ho was grounded for reload. After dark Tally-Ho surfaced and laid the last four mines on a course of 080° once again one cable apart. Depth of the water was 6 to 7 fathoms. (3)

15 May 1944
At 0517FG/15, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC, RN) dived in position 03°57'N, 99°35'E and then patrolled at periscope depth.

In the forenoon an armed trawler approached from the southward and subsequently stopped in position 210° - 3 nautical miles from the submarine. After about two hours the enemy got underway again and disappeared to the southward.

At 1825FG/15, HMS Tally-Ho surfaced in position 03°41'N, 99°46'E and set course for the Aroa Islands at 8 knots. (3)

17 May 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC, RN) attacked the German U-boat U-532 in the Malacca Straits in position 03°27'N, 100°56'E. First five torpedoes were fired, all missed. Then one torpedo was fired which also missed.

1439FG/17 - Sighted a floatplane bearing 350°. From its movements it seemed probable that it was escorting something.

1445FG/17 - While in position 03°27'N, 100°56'E sighted a submarine bearing 350°. The submarine was inshore of Tally-Ho and its estimated course was 155°, speed 12 knots.

1459FG/17 - Fired five torpedoes from 1200 yards. All missed.

1509FG/17 - Fired the last remaining internal bow torpedo but this one also missed. The enemy aircraft was now seen to fly along the track of this torpedo. Went deep.

Although the submarine attacked is listed as being Japanese in Tally-Ho's patrol report it was German U-boat U-532 that had departed Penang that day bound for Singapore. She was escorted by a German Arado floatplane. (3)

18 May 1944
The Japanese tanker Nichiyoku Maru (1945 GRT, built 1943) is damaged when she hits a mine laid on 14 May 1944 by the British submarine HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC, RN) in the Malacca Strait in position 03°41'N, 99°04'E.

[There is no consensus abut on which date this ship was mined, some sources say 18 May 1944, others 17 June 1944.] (3)

18 May 1944
At 1426FG/18, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC, RN), which was patrolling off the Aroa Islands, surfaced for a sun sight but was then spotted by an enemy aircraft which dropped a bomb a few minutes later after the sumbarine had quickly submerged again.

Around two hours later a large minesweeper appeared and remained stopped for quite a long time about two nautical miles from the submarine. With only one stern salvo of three external torpedoes, which were set to 8 feet, left, it was not possible to attack the enemy.

The next morning two submarine chasers and an armed trawler were sighted moving at slow speed patrolling the area. They did not close to within two nautical miles from HMS Tally-Ho though. (3)

24 May 1944
At 0532FG/24, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC, RN) dived in position 03°24'N, 100°39'E for a day of submerged patrol along the 10 fathom line between the Barnam River and Selangor.

Just before dark, two submarine chasers were sighted steering approximately 320° at slow speed. They were in line abreast and it looked as if they were minesweeping.

At 1827FG/24, HMS Tally-Ho surfaced in position 03°30'N, 100°47'E and proceeded to seaward to charge. (3)

26 May 1944
At 0539FG/26, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC, RN) dived in position 03°36'N, 100°21'E for a day of submerged patrol in the vicinity of the Sembilan Islands.

During the forenoon a large minesweeper was sighted about halfway between Pulau Jerak and the Sembilan Islands. The enemy was steering 150° at slow speed.

At 1827FG/26, HMS Tally-Ho surfaced in position 04°04'N, 100°29'E and proceeded northwards to patrol off the Deli River where a reconnaissance of that area was to be carried out the following day. (3)

31 May 1944
At dawn on the 31st, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC, RN) which had been patrolling near Sabang since the 30th, left patrol to return to Trincomalee. (3)

3 Jun 1944
Around 1200FG/3, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC, RN) ended her 8th war patrol at Trincomalee.

She was escorted in by HMS Maid Marion (T/Lt. F.R. Crawford, RNVR) which had joined around 0720FG/3. (3)

23 Jun 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) and HMS Petard (Lt.Cdr. R.C. Egan, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted exercises off Trincomalee. These included A/S exercises with the submarine HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN).

The exercises with HMS Petard were completed at 0600/24 and then HrMs Tromp returned to Trincomalee. (18)

24 Jun 1944
Around 1900FG/24, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) departed from Trincomalee for her 9th war patrol. She is to patrol in the Malacca Straits.

She was escorted out until around 2315FG/24 by HMS Maid Marion (T/Lt. F.R. Crawford, RNVR). (3)

24 Jun 1944
For the daily positions of HMS Tally-Ho during her 9th war patrol see the map below.

1 Jul 1944
From 1 to 3 July 1944, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) carried out a further phase of 'Operation Remarkable'.

During these days HMS Tally-Ho patrolled to the south of Pulau Jarak from dusk till dawn on each of these three days. There was however no sign of the junk they were to make rendezvous with. (3)

4 Jul 1944
At 0435FG/4, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) which had moved over to the east coast of Sumatra during the night, sighted North and South Brother Islands.

At 0520FG/4, two objects were sighted close inshore to the south-west.

At 0525FG/4, these objects were identified as submarine chasers. Tally-Ho then dived appartently not yet sighted against the lighter horizon. During the day some small junks were seen but these were not attacked.

At 1836FG/4, HMS Tally-Ho surfaced in position 03°50'N, 100°09'E and proceeded to seaward to charge. (3)

6 Jul 1944
At 0528FG/6, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) dived in position 03°46'N, 100°33'E for a day of submerged patrol to the south of the Sembilan Islands.

At 1841FG/6, HMS Tally-Ho surfaced in position 03°54'N, 100°35'E and then astablished patrol parallel to the coast and about 6 to 7 nautical miles from the 10 fathom line. It was full moon and visibility was excellent.

At 2031FG/6, two small objects were seen inshore. Tally-Ho turned stern on and stopped her engines. Gradually the objects became larger and more distinct. After five minutes, by which time they had been identified as submarine chasers, both vessels were observed flashing. It was difficult to decide whether they called Tally-Ho or were signalling between themselves.

Within another four or five minutes both vessels were much closer and it was quite clear that they were on patrol and were not engaged upon escort duties.

At 2042FG/6, HMS Tally-Ho went to full speed and proceeded to the south-west. The enemy, who appeared to be steering to the north and west, gradually disappeared.

It looked like the enemy had not sighted HMS Tally-Ho. Shortly after 2100FG/6 it was decided to reduce to slow speed.

Around 2120FG/6, the enemy were again sighted. One was astern of HMS Tally-Ho and the other on the starboard quarter. HMS Tally-Ho increased to full speed once more. During the next hour and a half the enemy came a little closer, but although they had a little margin of speed in their favour they made no serious effort to catch the submarine. From time to time HMS Tally-Ho altered course 15 degrees to starboard and finally steadied on 290°. The enemy followed each step.

At 2300FG/6, HMS Tally-Ho dived to 80 feet in position 03°38'N, 100°14'E and altered course to the south. The enemy closed, passed astern and dropped three single depth charges 31 minutes after HMS Tally-Ho had dived.

HMS Tally-Ho subsequently set course to patrol off the Aroa Islands. (3)

8 Jul 1944
At 0338FG/8, while patrolling the Aroa Islands / Brother Islands area, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) sighted two vessels approaching from the south steering approximately 320°. HMS Tally-Ho turned end on and reduced speed to dead slow. Both vessels were closing quite rapidly and were soon identified as submarine chasers. HMS Tally-Ho remained on the surface for a few minutes hoping to find that the enemy were escorting a suitable target. Unfortunately this was, again, not the case.

At 0343FG/8, the enemy appeared to be altering course towards. HMS Tally-Ho then dived to 80 feet and altered course to 030°. It was thought that the enemy must have sighted the submarine. Both vessels passed very close astern but nothing else happened. It had originally been intended to spent another day off the Jumpul Bank but as it was now to be expected that the enemy would be patrolling in this area it was decided to patrol in the One Fathom Bank Channel instead.

At 0535FG/8, HMS Tally-Ho surfaced in position 03°14'N, 100°16'E and proceeded towards the Aroa Islands at 12 knots. There was no more sign of enemy activity.

At 0728FG/8, HMS Tally-Ho dived in position 03°03'N, 100°31'E. Aroa Island was in sight. HMS Tally-Ho then patrolled at periscope depth in the One Fathom Bank Channel. Nothing more was seen all day. (3)

10 Jul 1944
At 0600FG/10, while patrolling near the Bernam River estuary, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) dived to periscope depth in position 03.44'N, 100.39'E. Patrol was maintained along the 10 fathom line between the Sembilan Islands and the Bernam River.

At 1415FG/10, a small 250 tons merchant vessel was seen approaching from the south-east. The enemy was steering 320° and it appeared to be just to the seaward of the lines of fishing stakes.

At 1437FG/10, HMS Tally-Ho surfaced for gun action in position 03°50'N, 100°41.5'E. HMS Tally-Ho ran on a parallel course with the emeny and opened fire with the 4" gun from an estimated range of 3500 yards. The actual range proved to be 4000 to 5000 yards and the enemy was inshore of the fishing stakes. The enemy immediately turned towards the coast at full speed and HMS Tally-Ho followed. After having fired 40 rounds, HMS Tally-Ho was almost on the fishing stakes and the water was getting very shallow. HMS Tally-Ho was thus forced to turn to seawards and break of the engagement. Four direct hits had been observed on the enemy vessel which was now seen making her way up the Bernam River.

HMS Tally-Ho then retired to the south-west remaining on the surface. (3)

12 Jul 1944
At 0320FG/12, while patrolling to the south-east of the Bernam River estuary, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) sighted an object on the port quarter which looked like a submarine chaser. A minute later the Asdic operator reported HE on the starboard bow but nothing could be seen but heavy rain was falling in that direction.

At 0323FG/12, HMS Tally-Ho dived to 80 feet and listened. For a long time nothing could be heard from the port quarter and the HE on the starboard bow was soon classified as being heavy rain. Eventually an indeterminate noise was heard from time to time on the port side but it did not sound very much like HE. At first light nothing could be seen through the periscope.

At 0457FG/12, HMS Tally-Ho surfaced and closed the coast at 12 knots.

Nothing more was seen all day. (3)

13 Jul 1944
Around 1400FG/13, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) left patrol to return to Fremantle. (3)

18 Jul 1944
Around 1120FG/18, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) ended her 9th war patrol at Trincomalee.

She was escorted in by the Italian sloop Eritrea which had joined at 0600FG/18. (3)

4 Aug 1944
Around 0915FG/4, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) and HMS Tudor (Lt. S.A. Porter, DSC, RN) departed Trincomalee for exercises. They were escorted by HMIS Pansy (Lt. R.G. Main, RINR).

HMS Tally-Ho first conducted gunnery exercises on a target that was being towed by HMIS Pansy.

HMS Tudor first conducted noise trials and then joined the gunnery exercises.

Before returning to harbour around 1945FG/4, both submarines made a practice attack on HMS Indomitable (Capt. J.A.S. Eccles, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral C. Moody, CB, RN) which was escorted by HMS Quilliam (Capt. R.G. Onslow, DSO and 2 Bars, RN), HMAS Quickmatch (Lt.Cdr. O.H. Becher, DSC, RAN) and HMS Redoubt (Lt.Cdr. N.E.G. Ropner, DSO, RN). (19)

6 Aug 1944
Around 1900FG/6, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) departed from Trincomalee for her 10th war patrol. She is to patrol in the Malacca Straits.

She departed at the same time for patrol as HMS Tudor (Lt. S.A. Porter, DSC, RN) and HrMs Zwaardvisch (Lt.Cdr. H.A.W. Goossens, RNN).

The submarines were escorted until around midnight by HMS Maid Marion (T/Lt. F.R. Crawford, RNVR). (3)

6 Aug 1944
For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tally-Ho during her 10th war patrol see the map below.

22 Aug 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) sank a coaster with gunfire in the Strait of Malacca in position 05°51'N, 100°03'E.

1721FG/22 - Sighted a small coaster to the north-west bearing 140°, speed about 8 knots. Started attack. The enemy was seen to be a motor vessel about 300 tons in size.

1748FG/22 - Surfaced and opened fire with the 4" gun from 2000 yards. During the action the range was rapidly reduced. In all 66 rounds were fired for a great many hits and the enemy caught fire. At a range of only 100 yards fire was ceased. The enemy was left ablaze and sank half an hour later in position 05°51'N, 100°03'E. (3)

24 Aug 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) sank three small junks with gunfire in the Strait of Malacca. One in position 04°29'N, 99°57'E and two in position 04°38'N, 100°21'E.

0630FG/24 - Sighted a junk ahead.

0747FG/24 - Sank a two masted auxiliary junk of about 60 tons with three rounds of 4". Position was 04°29'N, 99°57'E.

1000FG/24 - Altered course towards the coast.

1045FG/24 - Sighted a number of junks to the Eastward. Closed at full speed.

1145FG/24 - Sank a two masted junk of approximately 50 tons with two rounds of 4". This vessel was heavily laden with what looked like a cargo of tin ore.

1149FG/24 - Sank a large three masted junk with three rounds of 4". It was of about 150 tons and was loaded with bales of some sort. Position of the last two sinkings was 04°38'N, 100°21'E. (3)

25 Aug 1944
Around 0430FG/25, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) left patrol to return to Trincomalee. (3)

30 Aug 1944
Around 1230FG/30, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) ended her 10th war patrol at Trincomalee. (3)

3 Sep 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) is docked in AFD 26 at Trincomalee. (20)

7 Sep 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) is undocked. (20)

14 Sep 1944
During 14/15 September 1944, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) conducted exercises off Trincomalee. These included gunnery, night, A/S and attack exercises.

[No further details available.] (20)

18 Sep 1944
Around 1900FG/18, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) departed from Trincomalee for her 11th war patrol. She is to patrol in the Malacca Straits.

She is escorted out until 2340FG/18 by HMS Maid Marion (T/Lt. L.C. Cockrell, RNR). (3)

18 Sep 1944
For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tally-Ho during her 11th war patrol see the map below.

27 Sep 1944
At 0453FG/27, while patrolling to the south of the Sembilan Islands, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) sighted smoke on the port beam. HMS Tally-Ho altered course to close to investigate.

The contact soon turned out to be a coal burning vessel belching columns of smoke steering approximately 330°.

HMS Tally-Ho was not in a position to attack from submerged and it was getting light too rapidly to close the enemy and deliver a surface attack unobserved.

At daybreak the mast and tops of both the bridge and funnel could be seen. It was thought the enemy was a coal burning auxiliary gunboat of about 1000 tons. The enemy appeared to be in a hurry and although nothing else could be seen it was thought she might possibly be escorting a submarine. [This is very well possible as the Japanese submarine RO 113 (offsite link) arrived at Penang from Singapore on this day.]

After opening the range at full speed until only the top of the mast was visible, HMS Tally-Ho turned onto a parallel course. The enemy was steering 330° at 11.5 knots.

Gradually HMS Tally-Ho gained bearing. There was quite a good chance of being able to work far enough ahead to dive and attack before the enemy could reach the Sembilan Islands.

At the end of two and a half hours of hard chasing, an aircraft was sighted to the westward. Shortly afterwards, it turned towards and HMS Tally-Ho was forced to abandon the case and dive.

At 0737FG/27, HMS Tally-Ho dived to 80 feet in position 03°31'N, 100°27'E.

At 0804FG/27, returned to periscope depth just in time to see two bombers taking over the patrol from the original aircraft. The chase was now over and aircraft patrolled the area the entire day. (3)

30 Sep 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) attacked a convoy of three 500 tons coasters escorted by three escorts in the Malacca Strait in position 03°08.5'N, 99°58'E. One torpedo is fired but no hit is obtained.

0730FG/30 - Sighted three columns of smoke to the south-east. Soon afterwards sighted two aircraft in that direction.

0845FG/30 - It was now seen that it was a convoy of three coasters escorted by three submarine chasers and two aircraft.

0900FG/30 - Commenced attack. The coasters had been steering 315° and were then seen to alter course in succession about 30° to port for a few minutes. Then they altered course back to starboard and steadied on 310°.

At that time there was no reason to attach any particular significance to this alteration of course. A few days later an anti-torpedo fence which stretches between and along the line of fishing stacks in this vicinity was discovered. Presumably it was at this point that the enemy turned inshore to take refuge behind the fence.

Tally-Ho closed to attack until the water became too shallow to proceed any further. The coasters were seen to be of about 500 tons each.

0921FG/30 - In position 03°08.5'N, 99°58'E fired one torpedo at one of the coasters from 1200 yards. The torpedo exploded 1 min 12 sec after firing. It may have been deflected or exploded when it struck the anti-torpedo fence. Tally-Ho made off for deeper water. (3)

4 Oct 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) attacked a coaster with gunfire in the Strait of Malacca in position 03°09'N, 99°55'E.

1215FG/4 - Sighted a small coaster close inshore to the West.

1247FG/4 - Surfaced in position 03°09'N, 99°55'E and opened fire with the 4" gun at a range of 4500 yards.

The coaster, estimated at 200 tons, ran inshore ad ran aground. It was escorted by a Motor Torpedo Boat. Both the coaster and the MTB opened fire with small automatic weapons but their fire was very inaccurate posing little threat. The 4" fire from Tally-Ho was very erratic as both the gun layer and trainer complained that they could not see the target against the background. Fire was ceased in order not to waste ammunition. 34 Rounds had been fire but no hits were obtained.

1256FG/4 - Tally-Ho made off for deeper water. A few minutes later the MTB was seen to turn towards and was thought to have launched a torpedo against Tally-Ho. Cdr. Bennington changed course but no torpedo track was sighted. (3)

6 Oct 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) sank the Japanese auxiliary submarine chaser Cha 2 (130 tons) north-east of Medan, Sumatra in position 04°20'N, 98°24'E.

1034FG/6 - Surfaced to engage a Japanese auxiliary submarine chaser. The enemy was on the starboard beam, coming straight towards Tally-Ho at speed. Tally-Ho's opened fire with the 4" gun and the Oerlikon but the last one soon jammed. Also a floatplane was seen approaching from astern. Meanwhile the submarine chaser was also firing on Tally-Ho. At this time the Gunnery Officer was mortally wounded and it took some time before Cdr. Bennington himself gave some spotting corrections to the gun crew. After another correction five consecutive hits struck the submarine chaser. In all 19 rounds were fired.

The aircraft was now seen approaching and was taken under fire with a Vickers gun. Several hits were obtained and the aircraft was right over the submarine chaser when the last one blew up. Meanwhile Tally-Ho was diving to 80 feet. On the way down an explosion was heard thought to be the aircraft crashing.

The gunnery officer (Lt. Dennis John Adams, RN) died later that day of his wounds. His body was committed to the deep during the night. (3)

7 Oct 1944
Around 1330FG/7, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) left patrol to return to Trincomalee. (3)

11 Oct 1944
Around 1215FG/11, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) ended her 11th war patrol at Trincomalee. On entering harbour noise trials were carried out.

She was escorted in by HMS Maid Marion (T/Lt. L.C. Cockrell, RNR) which had joined around 0600FG/11. (3)

26 Oct 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) conducted exercises off Trincomalee during which she was escorted by HMS Lewes (T/Lt. M.H. Grylls, SANF(V)).

These exercises included gunnery exercises and also a practice attack was made on HMS London (Capt. R.V. Symonds-Tayler, DSC, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral H.T.C. Walker, CB, RN). (21)

29 Oct 1944
Around 1850FG/29, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) departed from Trincomalee for her 12th war patrol (9th in the far east). She is to patrol in the Malacca Straits and to perform a special operation (Operation Durian).

She was escorted out until midnight [the name of the escort is not given in the logbook.]

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Tally-Ho during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

9 Nov 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) performs special operation 'Durian'.

[details can be found in file ADM 199/1883, unfortunately our phonograph of the page in question is blurred and it is not possible to read the text.] (3)

16 Nov 1944
While on patrol to the north-west of Penang, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) attacks a Japanese submarine with first five than one torpedo. No hits were obtained.

0928FG/16 - While in position 05°46.5'N, 100°02.5'E sighted small object on the port quarter.

0925FG/16 - The object was identified as the top of a conning tower of a small submarine. The enemy appeared to be steering 128° at 12 knots and the range must have been over 10000 yards. Started attack.

0943FG/16 - Fired five torpedoes from about 7000 yards. Five minutes after firing the enemy turned away and combed the tracks. The submarine steadied end on to, and exactly ahead of Tally-Ho, who was still steering the firing course. As soon as it was clear the enemy was steady, a sixth torpedo was fired. Three minutes later the enemy turned to starboard an resumed on approximately the original course. Altered course to seaward as an aircraft appeared that started a search. 1017FG/16 - Steadied on a course of 310° and went to 50 feet as the aircraft appeared to have a fairly good idea of the position of Tally-Ho.

1029FG/16 - Heard on loud explosion fairly close. Probably a bomb.

1112FG/16 - Returned to periscope depth to see two aircraft now searching very close. Went to 60 feet.

1142FG/16 - Another loud explosion was heard. Most likely another bomb.

1230FG/16 - Returned to periscope depth. Saw an aircraft turning towards at very close range. Went to 60 feet again and changed course to 290°.

The Japanese submarines RO 113 and RO 115 (both offsite links) were based at Penang at this time. The target was most likely one of these two submarines, possibly out on exercises. (3)

17 Nov 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) sank seven sailing vessels with gunfire in the Strait of Malacca near Langkawi.

0230FG/17 - Started a search for coastal traffic in the direction of Langkawi.

0552FG/17 - Sank a 30 ton junk by gunfire in position 05°54'N, 99°28'E.

0604FG/17 - Dived in position 05°56'N, 99°29'E and patrolled of the southern tip of Langkawi.

1425FG/17 - Surfaced and commenced a junk hunt between Langkawi and Butang.

1515FG/17 - Sank a junk of 25 tons with gunfire in position 06°15'N, 99°32'E.

1630FG/17 - Sank four junks, each of about 20 tons, by gunfire in position 06°15'N, 99°39'E. These vessels were all heavily laden and sailed towards Penang. A fifth vessel, that was smaller, was left to pick up the survivors.

1810FG/17 - Sank another junk of about 50 tons by gunfire in position 05°57'N, 99°36'E. Now shifted patrol to the southern part of the area. (3)

18 Nov 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) sank three sailing vessels with gunfire in the Strait of Malacca to the south of Penang.

0547FG/18 - Dived and closed the Malayan coast between Penang and the Dindings.

1426FG/18 - Surfaced and searched inshore for another junk hunt.

1445FG/18 - Sank a junk of about 45 tons by gunfire in position 04°44'N, 100°14'E.

1537FG/18 - Sighted two large junks further inshore. Gave chase.

1647FG/18 - Sank a tonkang of 91 tons and a heavily laden three masted junk of about 100 tons by gunfire in position 04°37'N, 100°21'E. Seven Chinese who formed the crew of the Tongkang were picked up. (3)

20 Nov 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) sank the Japanese auxiliary minelayer Ma 4 (215 tons, built 1941) about 30 nautical miles east of the southern tip of Great Nicobar Island in position 06°55'N, 94°15'E.

1120FG/20 - Sighted a small coaster and escort vessel that had been sighted and hunted earlier in the day. Later also sighted an MTB. Commenced attack on the coaster.

1150FG/20 - As the range decreased it became clear that the escort was a far better target and that the coaster was hardly big enough to make a torpedo target. So shifted target to the escort.

1207FG/20 - Fired three torpedoes set to six feet resulting in three !!! hits. A very heavy explosion followed almost at once. Most likely this was the magazine or depth charges exploding. Both the coaster and MTB were now seen to alter course directly towards Tally-Ho at very close range. Increased depth and altered course at full speed.

1215FG/20 - Returned to periscope depth to find both the coaster and MTB on the Starboard quarter about 400 yards away. Again both turned towards Tally-Ho so went deep again and altered course. The MTB remained nearby until after 1300 hours.

1309FG/20 - Came to periscope depth. The MTB could be seen searching astern. The coaster could be seen steering to the south or south-west.

1348FG/20 - Both vessels were out of sight. Surfaced and searched for them but could not find them again, most likely they had changed course.

1800FG/20 - Left patrol to return to Trincomalee. (3)

23 Nov 1944
Around 1140FG/23, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) ended her 12th war patrol (9th in the far east) at Trincomalee.

She was escorted in by HMS Lewes (T/Lt. M.H. Grylls, SANF(V)) which had joined around 0540FG/23. (3)

3 Dec 1944
Around 1900FG/3, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) departed from Trincomalee bound for the U.K. where she is to refit. The first leg of the trip is to Aden.

She is escorted until 0110FG/4, by HMS Maid Marion (T/Lt. L.C. Cockrell, RNR). (22)

3 Dec 1944
For the daily positions of HMS Tally-Ho during the passage from Ceylon to the U.K. passage see the map below.

14 Dec 1944
Around 0745C/14, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Aden. (22)

15 Dec 1944
Around 0815C/15, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) departed from Aden bound for Port Said. (22)

20 Dec 1944
HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) passes the Suez Canal northbound and arrived at Port Said around 1520B/20. (22)

27 Dec 1944
Around 1630B/27, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) departed from Port Said bound for Malta. (22)

31 Dec 1944
Around 1700B/31, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Malta. (22)

2 Jan 1945
Around 1115A/2, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) departed from Malta bound for Gibraltar. (23)

7 Jan 1945
Around 0930A/7, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Gibraltar. On entering harbour D/G trials were carried out. (23)

10 Jan 1945
Around 1600A/10, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) departed from Gibraltar bound for Plymouth. She made most part of the passage in convoy MKS 76.

[For more info on this convoy see the event ' Convoy MKS 76 ' for 10 January 1945.] (3)

10 Jan 1945

Convoy MKS 76.

This convoy departed Gibraltar on 10 January 1945.

It was made up of the following merchant vessels; Algonquin Park (Canadian, 7130 GRT, 1942), Armadale (British, 5066 GRT, built 1929), Baron Belhaven (British, 6591 GRT, built 1925), Colytto (Dutch, 4408 GRT, built 1926), Gascony (British, 4716 GRT, built 1925), Gleniffer (British, 9559 GRT, built 1919), Ragnhild (Norwegian, 2833 GRT, built 1941), Strategist (British, 6255 GRT, built 1937) and Taxiarchis (Greek, 4221 GRT, built 1913).

The submarine HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) is also taking passage in this convoy.

On departure from Gibraltar they were escorted by the frigates HMS Inver (Lt.Cdr. F.H. Gray, RD, RNR), HMS Aire (A/Lt.Cdr. N.K. Boyd, DSC and Bar, RNR) and the corvettes HMS Crocus (T/Lt. D.G. White, RNVR) and HMS Spiraea (T/A/Lt.Cdr. H.D. Reid, RANVR).

At 1500A/11, the Casablanca section of the convoy joined. they had departed Casablanca on 10 January. The Casablanca section was made up of the following merchant vessels; Baron Graham (British, 3242 GRT, built 1925), Conakrian (British, 4876 GRT, built 1937), Copacabana (Belgian, 7340 GRT, built 1938), Groix (French, 9975 GRT, built 1922), Nicolas (Greek, 4540 GRT, built 1910), Sammex (British, 7219 GRT, built 1943), Samsteel (British, 7219 GRT, built 1943), Stuyvesant (Dutch, 4249 GRT, built 1918), Tigre (Norwegian, 5498 GRT, built 1926), Tolten (British, 5348 GRT, built 1930), Toronto (British, 5018 GRT, built 1928), Vermeer (Dutch, 7240 GRT, built 1941) and Wearpool (British, 4982 GRT, built 1936).

They were escorted to the rendezvous by the destroyer escort Sénégalais and the patrol vessels Le Ruse and L'Emporté. These escorts then returned to Casablanca.

On 13 January 1945, HMS Crocus and HMS Spiraea were detached to southbound convoy KMS 77.

At 0130A/16, the rescue ship Empire Rest (British, 1333 GRT, built 1944) and the corvettes HMS Leeds Castle (T/A/Lt.Cdr. W.T. Hodson, DSC and Bar, RNVR) and HMS Oxford Castle (T/Lt. H.E. Holden, DSC, RNR) joined coming from southbound convoy OS 104 / KMS 78.

Around 1600A/17, in position 48°26'N, 07°12'W, the 'Downs section' was detached. It was made up of the following merchant vessels Sammex, Samsteel, Strategist, Tolsen and Toronto. HMS Tally-Ho also parted company with this section. This section was escorted by HMS Inver and HMS Aire. Around 0730A/18, HMS Tally-Ho parted company with the 'Downs section' to proceed to Plymouth escorted by HMS Reboundo (Skr. S.F. Cleveland, RNR).

The convoy arrived in U.K. waters on 20 January 1945 having encountered heavy weather on the last days of it's passage in which sometimes had to hove to.

(24)

18 Jan 1945
Around 1400A/18, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Plymouth.

She departed for Portsmouth around 1800A/18. (23)

19 Jan 1945
Around 0930A/19, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Portsmouth (Fort Blockhouse). (3)

21 Jan 1945
Around 1400A/21, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Portsmouth for Harwich.

She is escorted by HMS Flint (T/Lt. G. Muego, RNVR). (23)

22 Jan 1945
Around 2250A/22, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Harwich from Portsmouth.

Around 0850A/22, HMS Lord Plender (A/Skr.Lt. J.W. Shell, RNR) had taken over the escort duties from HMS Flint (T/Lt. G. Muego, RNVR). (23)

24 Jan 1945
Around 0845A/24, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) departed Harwich for Blyth. She was escorted by HMS Lord Plender (A/Skr.Lt. J.W. Shell, RNR). (23)

25 Jan 1945
Around 2140A/25, HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) arrived at Blyth from Harwich. (23)

18 Feb 1945
HMS Tally-Ho (Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC and Bar, RN) proceeded from Blyth to the Swan Hunter shipyard at Wallsend-on-Tyne where she was to refit. (25)

31 Jul 1945
With her refit completed, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt. J.P. Fyfe, DSC, RN) proceeded from the Tyne to Blyth.

11 Aug 1945
Around 0700A/11, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt. J.P. Fyfe, DSC, RN) departed Blyth for Holy Loch. (26)

13 Aug 1945
Around 1430A/13, HMS Tally-Ho (Lt. J.P. Fyfe, DSC, RN) arrived at Holy Loch to begin a period of trials and training. (26)

22 Aug 1945
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt. J.P. Fyfe, DSC, RN) conducted exercises in the Clyde area. (26)

23 Aug 1945
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt. J.P. Fyfe, DSC, RN) conducted exercises in the Clyde area. These included a practice attack on HMS Truculent (Lt. E.C. Croswell, DSC, RN) (26)

24 Aug 1945
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt. J.P. Fyfe, DSC, RN) conducted exercises in the Clyde area. (26)

28 Aug 1945
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt. J.P. Fyfe, DSC, RN) conducted speed trials in the Clyde area followed by torpedo discharge trials off Arrochar. (26)

29 Aug 1945
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt. J.P. Fyfe, DSC, RN) conducted torpedo discharge trials off Arrochar. She proceeded to Holy Loch on completion.

HMS Tally-Ho continued her working-up programme before she was sent out on a deployment to the Far East later in the year. (26)

26 Sep 1945
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt. J.P. Fyfe, DSC, RN) is docked in AFD 7 at Holy Loch.

[The date she is undocked is currently not known to us.] (27)

27 Oct 1945
HMS Tally-Ho (Lt. J.P. Fyfe, DSC, RN) departed Holy Loch for the Far East. She arrived at Hong Kong on 25 December 1945. (25)

Media links


The Hunting Submarine

Trenowden, Ian


The T-class Submarine

Kemp, Paul J.

Sources

  1. ADM 173/18181
  2. ADM 173/18182
  3. ADM 199/1862
  4. ADM 173/18183
  5. ADM 173/18184
  6. ADM 173/17891 + ADM 173/18184 + ADM 173/18285
  7. ADM 199/1862 + KTB of U 455 from 23 April 1943 to 31 July 1943 (NARA, T 1022, roll 2839, PG 30508)
  8. ADM 199/585 + ADM 199/2101
  9. ADM 173/18186
  10. ADM 199/1916
  11. ADM 199/18187
  12. ADM 173/18187
  13. ADM 199/1862 + KTB of U 178 from 28 August 1943 to 25 November 1943 (NARA, T 1022, roll 2836, PG 30165)
  14. ADM 173/18188
  15. ADM 199/1862 + ADM 199/1882
  16. ADM 173/18931
  17. ADM 173/18932
  18. ADM 173/18934 + Files 2.12.03.6853 and 2.12.03.6854 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  19. ADM 173/18936 + ADM 173/19140
  20. ADM 173/18937
  21. ADM 173/18938
  22. ADM 173/18940
  23. ADM 173/19828
  24. ADM 199/977 + ADM 199/2102
  25. ADM 199/2572
  26. ADM 173/19829
  27. ADM 173/19830

ADM numbers indicate documents at the British National Archives at Kew, London.


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