Italian submarines in World War Two


Giuseppe Finzi (FZ, I.2)
Finzi

TypeOcean going 
ClassCalvi (10) 
Laid down 1 Aug 1932 Odero-Terni-Orlando, Muggiano
Launched29 Jun 1935
Commissioned8 Jan 1936
End service9 Sep 1943
Stricken
Loss date
Loss position
History Captured at Bordeaux by the Germans on 9th September 1943 while undergoing conversion to a cargo submarine, code name "AQUILA IV". Renamed UIT-21 by the Germans. Scuttled at Le Verdon-sur-Mer on 25th August 1944.
Fate

Commands

CommanderDate fromDate toCommand
C.C. Alberto Dominici17 Nov 193920 Apr 1941
C.C. Ugo Giudice20 Apr 19414 Oct 1942
C.C. Giovenale Anfossi5 Oct 194231 Oct 1942
T.V. Angelo Amendolia1 Nov 194221 Jan 1943
T.V. Mario Rossetto21 Jan 194321 May 1943
C.F. Ferdinando Corsi22 May 19439 Jun 1943
T.V. Mariano Dellino22 Jun 19438 Sep 1943

Patrols and events

 CommanderDateTimePortArr. dateArr. timeArr. portMilesDescription
Dominici, Alberto3 Jun 19402320La Spezia5 Jun 19400205CagliariPassage La Spezia-Calgari with the submarines Glauco, Tazzoli and Cappellini escorted by the torpedo boat Curtatone.

1Dominici, Alberto5 Jun 19401115Cagliari10 Jul 19401115Cagliari4976,42Patrolled off Canary Islands. On 10th June, all the officers and eighteen ratings suffered an intoxication due to Methylene Chloride. The problem was quickly identified, the submarine surfaced to ventilate and all the bottles of Methylene Chloride disposed of.
  10 Jun 1940
(0) East of Gibraltar.
All the officers and eighteen ratings suffered from intoxication due to Methylene Chloride. The problem was quickly identified, the submarine surfaced to ventilate and all the bottles of Methylene Chloride disposed of. Most of the men recovered after four or five days, except for two men who took ten days.
  12 Jun 19400253
0412 (e)

(e) 35° 48'N, 5° 10'W
(0) 160° - Point Almina - 6 miles.
From a distance of 1,200-1,500 metres, Giuseppe Finzi sighted the shape of a destroyer coming straight at her and dived immediately. The first depth charges exploded as the submarine was a a depth of 30 before settling on the bottom at 108 metres. This was the destroyer HMS Watchman, which claimed the submarine sunk or badly damaged, but Finzi suffered only minor damages. Later in the day, the armed trawler HMT Stella Sirius also reported a contact off Almina Point.
  23 Jun 19401610
(0) North of Teneriffe (Canary Islands).
A French sloop of the BOUGAINVILLE class was sighted but the submarine could not gain an attack position.
  9 Jul 19401650
(0) West of Sardinia.
The submarine was suddenly attacked by an aircraft, believed to be British, which dropped a single bomb. It exploded very near the hull, but caused no damage. The aircraft may have been Italian as no RAF bomber reported such an attack.

Dominici, Alberto12 Jul 19400900Cagliari13 Jul 19401535La Spezia377Passage Cagliari-La Spezia.

Dominici, Alberto26 Aug 19400815La Spezia26 Aug 19401628La Spezia32Exercises.

Dominici, Alberto27 Aug 19400716La Spezia27 Aug 19401730La Spezia45Exercises.

Dominici, Alberto30 Aug 19400843La Spezia30 Aug 19401054La Spezia8,5Exercises.

2Dominici, Alberto7 Sep 19400630La Spezia29 Sep 19401750Bordeaux2889Passage La Spezia to Bordeaux. Passed Gibraltar on 12th September 1940. Patrolled between 42°00 and 43°00'N, and between 10°00 W and Spanish coast. Sighted several vessels, mostly Spanish or Portuguese. Escorted in by the German minesweepers M-2 and M-9. Visited by Admiral Doenitz on 30th September 1940.
  14 Sep 1940074036° 08'N, 9° 25'WAn aircraft was sighted at long range and the submarine dived.
  15 Sep 19401202-121137° 23'N, 10° 01'WAt 1125 hours, the submarine sighted an escort vessel and dived. The vessel dropped seven depth-charges between 1202 and 1211 hours. The submarine escaped unscathed.

3Dominici, Alberto24 Oct 19401130Bordeaux4 Dec 19401140Bordeaux6409,6Patrolled west of British Isles, between 57°20 and 59°20'N and 17°00' and 20°00'W [between Italian Grids 0670 and 0602]. The submarine was escorted on her way back by Sperrbrecher 3 and minesweeper M-10 (2.MSFL).of the 2nd Minesweeping Flotilla.
  30 Oct 1940134556° 30'N, 18° 09'WA 6-8,000-ton steamer armed with two guns was observed. The submarine fired one torpedo (533mm) from a bow tube at a distance 1,500-2,000 metres, but missed.
  30 Oct 19401410-154056° 30'N, 18° 09'W
(0) Approximately.
The submarine heard H.E. of what must have been an approaching escort vessel, which dropped seven depth-charges at 1430 hours. She dived to 80 meters. Another depth-charge followed at 1523 hours and a final one at 1540 hours, but the submarine was undamaged.
  6 Nov 1940145259° 08'N, 23° 02'WAn unknown steamer was sighted at a distance of 10-12,000 metres and Giuseppe Finzi moved to intercept. At 1533 hours, the submarine dived but could not close the range at less than 6,000 meters and lost contact. The executive officer T.V. Girola was highly critical of his commanding officer for the extreme caution the latter exhibited during this action.
  16 Nov 1940170558° 00'N, 19° 00'WAt 1705 hours, Giuseppe Finzi received a signal reporting an escorted convoy of 10-20 steamers at 1415 in 55°35' N, 11°05' W steering 250°, 9 knots. At 1810 hours the submarine turned on a 210° course at 13.5 knots to intercept. In heavy seas and taking water from the stern, the submarine was forced to change course to 330° at 0645 hours on the 17th, and to reduce speed to 4 knots.
  18 Nov 1940211058° 10'N, 19° 00'W
(0) Approximately.
At 2110 hours, Giuseppe Finzi received a signal reporting a convoy at 0345 hours on the 18th, in 56°35' N, 13°55' W steering 250°, 14 knots. At 2145 hours, the submarine turned on a 180° course at 8 knots to intercept. The submarine gave up the chase at 1500 hours as it was believed that it had no chance to intercept.
  22 Nov 1940120557° 35'N, 18° 52'WGiuseppe Finzi sighted a lone steamer at 6-7,000 metres and dived to 60 meters to attempt to close submerged using her hydrophones. At 1515 hours, three depth-charges were heard, followed at 1530 hours by another four which detonated closer. Finally, at 1540 hours, the submarine detected the convoy with hydrophones. It was estimated at 10 or 20 steamers, escorted by auxiliary cruisers steering 100° course at a speed of 8 knots. Another fourteen depth-charges were heard between 1610-1615 hours and contact was lost at 1900 hours. At 1950 hours, the submarine surfaced in very poor visibility and made an enemy report.
  24 Nov 19400000-013058° 19'N, 20° 17'WGiuseppe Finzi heard hydrophone effects believed to be from a convoy on a 080° course. The submarine surfaced at 1135 hours and made an enemy report.
  27 Nov 1940132057° 40'N, 18° 30'WA vessel was sighted at a distance of 15,000 metres. The submarine dived immediately and took an intercepting course to attack, but soon gave up the chase as the target was travelling at 15 knots and she could not close the range.
  27 Nov 1940181557° 16'N, 17° 37'WA three-funnelled destroyer was sighted at a distance of 10,000 metres. The submarine submerged to attack but could not stay at periscope depth because of the heavy seas and lost contact.
  28 Nov 1940051555° 20'N, 17° 36'WAn unknown vessel was sighted and closed 700-800 metres. It turned out to be a submarine and Finzi turned away.
  30 Nov 1940051549° 57'N, 17° 56'WGiuseppe Finzi sighted an unknown vessel at a distance of 10,000 metres and turned to attack. It was then identified as a submarine and the Italian submarine turned away.

Dominici, Alberto24 Feb 19410835Bordeaux24 Feb 19411440Le Verdon65Passage Bordeaux-Le Verdon.

Dominici, Alberto25 Feb 19410835Le Verdon25 Feb 19411540La Pallice65Passage Le Verdon-La Pallice escorted by the German submarine chaser UJ-E and Sperrbrecher 34.

Dominici, Alberto27 Feb 19410845La Pallice27 Feb 19411628La Pallice17Exercises.

Dominici, Alberto28 Feb 19410838La Pallice28 Feb 19411946Pauillac95Passage La Pallice-Pauillac.

Dominici, Alberto1 Mar 19410800Pauillac1 Mar 19411020Bordeaux20Passage Pauillac-Bordeaux.
  1 Mar 19411240
(0) At La Pallice.
The submarine ran aground as she was returning from exercises and had to be freed with the help of tugs.

Dominici, Alberto1 Mar 19411020Bordeaux1 Mar 19411415Bassens3Passage Bordeaux-Bassens. Ran aground and was freed with the help of a tug.
  1 Mar 19411240
(0) At La Pallice.
The submarine ran aground as she was returning from exercises and had to be freed with the help of tugs.

Dominici, Alberto1 Mar 19411915Bassens1 Mar 19411930Bordeaux3Passage Bassens-Bordeaux.
  1 Mar 19411240
(0) At La Pallice.
The submarine ran aground as she was returning from exercises and had to be freed with the help of tugs.

4Dominici, Alberto9 Mar 19411545Bordeaux17 Apr 19411300Bordeaux6752Sailed escorted by the German minesweeper M-12 and Sperrbrecher 16 and patrolled (1) between 40°00'N and 42°00'N, and between 17°00'W and 21°00'W (2) between 13°00'N and 18°00'N, and between 19°00'W and 21°00'W (3) between 27°00'N and 30°00'N, and between 18°00'W and 21°00'W (4) between 36°00'N and 38°00'N, and between 13°00'W and 16°00'W (the BETASOM report gives 36°00'N and 39°00 N, and between 13°00'W and 15°00'W), west of the Canary Islands and east of Cape Verde Island.
  17 Mar 19410205A destroyer was sighted at a distance of 2,000 metres and she turned toward the submarine who dived to a depth of 60 metres.
  17 Mar 19410430-200040° 00'N, 22° 40'WAt 0235 hours, the hydrophones detected noise of vessels steering 135°, 8 knots. At 0430 hours, the submarine surfaced and proceeded at 13.5 knots to search for a convoy from Gibraltar.
  17 Mar 19412000The submarine having failed to locate the first convoy from Gibraltar turned toward a second convoy. The search went on until 2130 hours on the 18th and again nothing was sighted.
  24 Mar 19411540An unknown vessel was sighted, which turned out to be Spanish. The submarine aborted the attack.
  2 Apr 19411750
1800 (e)
26° 20'N, 18° 50'WAt 1750 hours, a smoke was observed on the horizon and the submarine closed. It was a convoy of ten to fifteen ships escorted by destroyers. This was convoy S.L.69 bound from Freetown for Liverpool. The submarine dived when one of the destroyers, followed by a second, turned toward her. Two depth charges exploded at 1941 hours and a third at 1950 hours, but Giuseppe Finzi escaped damage. The submarine then tried to renew contact with the convoy but at 0900 hours on the 4th, she abandoned the chase. This was the Free French sloop Commandant Dominé (C.C. Jaquelin de la Porte de Vaux), which dropped three depth-charges after being guided by the seaplane from HMS Mauritius.

Giudice, Ugo27 Jun 19410840Bordeaux27 Jun 19412143Le Verdon55Passage Bordeaux-Le Verdon.

Giudice, Ugo29 Jun 19412223Le Verdon29 Jun 19411555La Pallice87Passage Le Verdon-La Pallice.

5Giudice, Ugo3 Aug 19411301La Pallice11 Sep 19411150Bordeaux7119Sailed for Atlantic patrol via 45°00'N, 23°30'W to ca. 39°00'N, 14°00'W.
  5 Aug 1941210045° 12'N, 12° 26'WA derelict mine was sighted. The submarine attempted to destroy it with machine gun fire but was unsuccessful because of the heavy seas. At 0800 hours on the 6th, following orders from BETASOM, the submarine proceeded at 10 knots to 37°45' N, 11°15' W.
  7 Aug 1941161540° 34'N, 12° 33'WAn unknown steamer was sighted but left alone as GIUDICE did not wish to disclose his position and resumed proceeding to intercept a convoy.
  9 Aug 1941230038° 12'N, 11° 25'W
(0) Approximately.
Giuseppe Finzi was informed by BETASOM that a convoy had sailed from Gibraltar.She was ordered to intercept it in 33°55' N, 09°15' W at 2000 hours on the 10th. The submarine altered course at 12 knots, but later engine defects slowed her down and were repaired. At 1735 hours on the 10th, Finzi received another order to proceed to 36°45' N, 10°15' W, the convoy was in 36°25' N, 08°25' W at 1500 hours on the 10th. A signal from BETASOM, received at 2330 hours on the 10th, ordered her to 36°15' N, 11°15' W. This location was reached at 0715 hours on the 11th with several more signals following until 12th August.
  12 Aug 1941164038° 35'N, 12° 55'W
(0) Italian Grid 9502/64.
The enemy convoy was sighted at a distance of 8,000 metres. The submarine was forced to submerge at 1645 hours as one of the escorting destroyers turned toward her. At 2045 hours, she surfaced and tried to catch up with the convoy. At 2235 hours on the 12th, a signal was received from BETASOM reporting the convoy in 38°55' N, 13°25' W and ordering Finzi, Marconi and Veniero to attack it, but Finzi sighted nothing.
  13 Aug 1941023039° 11'N, 14° 02'WAn enemy destroyer was sighted at a distance of 3,000 metres and the submarine maneuvered to gain a more favourable position.
  13 Aug 1941024539° 11'N, 14° 02'WA second enemy destroyer was sighted at a distance of 2-3,000 metres and GIUDICE elected to go deep.
  13 Aug 1941074539° 24'N, 14° 30'WAn enemy destroyer was sighted at a distance of 4,000 metres and the submarine was forced to submerge.
  13 Aug 1941151539° 24'N, 14° 30'W
(0) Approximately.
A submarine was sighted. This was probably Marconi, but is not identified in the patrol report. Recognition signals were exchanged but at 1520 hours, Giuseppe Finzi was forced to submerge by an aircraft.
  13 Aug 19412000-2045
1755 zone-1 (e)
39° 54'N, 15° 36'W
(e) 40° 19'N, 15° 46'W
(0) Italian Grid 5142/46.
Two destroyers were observed to be depth-charging a submarine. These were HMS Faulknor and HMS Wild Swan. Giuseppe Finzi moved away.
  14 Aug 1941004740° 42'N, 15° 46'WGiuseppe Finzi was cruising on the surface, when a destroyer was sighted. The submarine submerged at 0050 hours. Later, the convoy was heard with her hydrophones but she could not get within sighting range.
  14 Aug 1941080540° 48'N, 16° 41'W
(0) Approximately.
Two destroyers were sighted in the mist, at a distance of 7-8,000 metres. Giuseppe Finzi submerged and heard depth-charge explosions at 0845, 0858 and 0958 hours but at a distance.
  14 Aug 19411830The submarine had just surfaced when a destroyer was sighted at a distance of 4,000 metres. She was forced to submerge again and, heard three depth-charges at a distance.
  19 Aug 19411130-152037° 37'N, 19° 10'W
(0) Approximately.
A smoke was sighted on the horizon. Finzi gave chase but at 1520 hours, the vessel was identified as Spanish and the submarine turned away.
  21 Aug 1941140537° 08'N, 15° 14'WA steamer was sighted but she turned out to be Portuguese.
  26 Aug 1941014032° 02'N, 13° 46'WA Spanish vessel was sighted steering 020° and no action was taken.
  26 Aug 1941071531° 15'N, 13° 56'WA Spanish vessel was sighted on a northerly course and she was left alone.
  26 Aug 1941102531° 02'N, 14° 00'WAn unidentified ship was sighted and the submarine gave chase, but the vessel was fast and escaped.
  29 Aug 1941174529° 26'N, 12° 33'WAn unidentified ship was sighted and the submarine gave chase, but lost her in the mist. In the next days, the submarine sighted other ships but they turned out to be either Spanish or Portuguese.

Giudice, Ugo5 Dec 19410850Bordeaux5 Dec 19411255Le Verdon60Passage Bordeaux-Le Verdon.

6Giudice, Ugo5 Dec 19411748Le Verdon26 Dec 19411149St. Nazaire5273Sailed on a mission to rescue the survivors from the German raider Atlantis and her supply ship Python, northwest of Cape Verde (took 70 men from U-129). Four submarines participated in the operation: Finzi, Calvi, Torelli and Tazzoli. The four commanders were decorated by Admiral Doenitz.
  11 Dec 1941082535° 27'N, 18° 25'WAn unknown illuminated steamer was sighted steering 000°-020°. She was probably neutral and C.C. Giudice did not attempt to investigate as his submarine was on a rescue mission.
  16 Dec 19411315-154014° 30'N, 28° 30'WGiuseppe Finzi met with U-129 (KL Nicolai Claussen) carrying survivors from Atlantis and Python and took off seventy survivors and brought them to St. Nazaire.

Giudice, Ugo26 Dec 19411430St. Nazaire27 Dec 19411112Le Verdon148Passage St. Nazaire-Le Verdon.

Giudice, Ugo27 Dec 19411112Le Verdon27 Dec 19411550Bordeaux60Passage Le Verdon-Bordeaux.

7Giudice, Ugo5 Feb 19420950Bordeaux31 Mar 19421759Le Verdon8286Patrolled in Caribbean, carried nineteen torpedoes. On 2nd February, BETASOM had issued an order to bombard Atlantic City (New Jersey) but three days later the order was countermanded by Admiral Legnani who warned them not to entertain similar ideas.
  10 Feb 1942120540° 43'N, 14° 11'WGiuseppe Finzi sighted two destroyers at a distance of 10,000 metres proceeding on a NW course. One of them turned toward the submarine and the submarine dived. Only two depth-charges were heard, one at 1235 hours and the other at 1247 hours but the destroyer remained in the area for several hours. Apparently she was keeping down the submarine as a convoy was heard at 1700 hours in 40°43' N, 14°18' W. The submarine finally surfaced at 1910 hours.
  3 Mar 1942133022° 06'N, 62° 54'WAn unknown aircraft was sighted at 15,000 metres and the submarine dived.
  4 Mar 1942202223° 40'N, 62° 22'WAn unidentified tanker was sighted at 10,000 metres steering 160°. The submarine maneuvered to carry out a night attack, but engine defects delayed her and she could not renew contact.
  5 Mar 1942113824° 11'N, 61° 33'WAn illuminated steamer was sighted on a SE course at a distance of 8,000 metres. The submarine gave up the chase as she appeared to be neutral.
  6 Mar 19420308
2110/5 (e)
23° 36'N, 62° 28'W
(e) 23° 35'N, 62° 39'W
At 2055 hours on 5th March 1942, a smoke was sighted on the horizon at a range of 10,000 meters in 24°00' N, 61°42' W. It turned out to be a tanker steering 265°.

At 0308 hours on the 6th, Giuseppe Finzi closed to 1,200 metres and , she fired a pair of torpedoes (533mm) from her bow tubes. One torpedo apparently hit amidship and another hit the stern. However, survivors later reported that only one torpedo hit under the bridge.

This was the British Melpomene (ex-French, 7,011 GRT, built 1923) bound from Belfast to New Orleans in convoy O.S.19. The crew began to abandon ship.

At 0337 hours, the submarine fired a third torpedo from a bow tube at Melpomene and hit her again, but she failed to sink.

At 0402 hours, a fourth torpedo was fired and squarely hit Melpomene which finally sank at 0423 hours. The forty-nine men of her crew had taken to three lifeboats and made for San Juan (Puerto Rico). They were all rescued (including three seriously wounded) by the American steamer Idaho.
  7 Mar 1942015022° 42'N, 60° 07'WAt 1435 hours on 6th March 1942, GIUDICE sighted a vessel from a distance of 8,000 metres and trailed her with the intention of attacking after dusk.

The attack finally occurred at 0150 hours on the 7th, Giuseppe Finzi firing two bow torpedoes (533mm) and both hit. The vessel was only damaged and the crew began to abandon ship. This was the Swedish Skåne (4528 GRT, built 1921) [also reported as Boren, ex Skåne)

At 0254 hours, a third torpedo was fired and again hit the Swedish Skåne. She was sinking very slowly and the submarine fired 7 rounds to finish her off.

At 0502 hours, gunfire was resumed with another 18 rounds, pumped into her hull rendering the ship in a sinking condition. At 0620 hours, the submarine was forced to dive because of an aircraft with lights on (which was probably a commercial one). An explosion was heard at 0700 hours and Skåne must have sunk at this time. The crew of thirty-six were all saved.

On 8th March, between 1130 and 1700 hours, the submarine reloaded her forward tubes with three torpedoes which were carried on deck.
  8 Mar 1942173022° 42'N, 60° 07'WThe submarine was instructed by BETASOM to cede 50 tons of fuel to Morosini. GIUDICE replied that this would significantly curtail the autonomy of Giuseppe Finzi and BETASOM instructed him to cede only 30 tons.
  11 Mar 1942123023° 12'N, 56° 22'WThe Italian submarine Morosini was sighted and recognition signals were exchanged. However, at 1250 hours, Morosini sighted a ship in 23°12' N, 56°42' W steering 240° and Giuseppe Finzi turned away to let her carry out an attack.
  11 Mar 1942165523° 03'N, 56° 46'WAn unknown steamer was sighted on a 250° course. (possibly Manaqui?). Giuseppe Finzi closed to attack, but then sighted another ship at 1925 hours.
  11 Mar 1942192522° 35'N, 57° 25'WFinzi closed to attack but then sighted Morosini at 2010 and told her of the sightings.
  12 Mar 19420149A steamer had been sighted at dusk on 11th March and Giuseppe Finzi closed to attack. GIUDICE opted for a stern shot, as he only had one torpedo left in the bow tubes. However, he was beaten to the race by Morosini which torpedoed the steamer first. The target was probably Manaqui (2802 GRT, built 1921) who disappeared without a trace at that time.
  12 Mar 19421305Giuseppe Finzi closed Morosini to refuel her, as instructed by BETASOM. At 1516 hours, she took her in tow to start the refuelling process and eventually 24 tons were transferred. Finzi then returned home.

Giudice, Ugo1 Apr 19421400Le Verdon1 Apr 19422015Bordeaux58Passage Le Verdon-Bordeaux.

Giudice, Ugo5 Jun 19421100Le Verdon5 Jun 19421635Bordeaux58Passage Bordeaux-Le Verdon.

8Giudice, Ugo6 Jun 19422200Le Verdon17 Aug 19421515Bordeaux14381Patrolled in Caribbean through Crooked Passage and Windward Passage between Haiti and Jamaica near Roncador. Carried nineteen torpedoes (eight forward, eight aft and three in outside containers and 330 rounds of 10 cm). Appears to have been used as a supply vessel for the other submarines (Da Vinci, Giuliani and Morosini).
  20 Jun 19421935-224525° 15'N, 29° 50'W
(0) Italian Grid 2639/26.
Italian submarine Leonardo Da Vinci was first sighted at 1500 hours in 25°15' N, 29°50' W (the actual rendezvous point was 25°05' N, 30°05' W). From 1935 to 2245 hours, Giuseppe Finzi ceded 11 tons of fuel to her.
  1 Jul 1942123123° 30'N, 55° 45'W
(0) Italian Grid 7373/15.
The submarine Morosini was encountered and she was to take some fuel from Finzi. At 1231 hours, in heavy seas. the two submarines had a minor collision. The refuelling was postponed to 3 July 1942 and again to 4 July 1942 but the bad weather persisted and it was cancelled.
  12 Jul 1942233418° 05'N, 74° 48'W
(0) Italian Grid 4919/15.
A corvette was sighted at 4,000 metres, the submarine took no action.
  13 Jul 1942051517° 35'N, 74° 35'W
(0) Italian Grid 3419/44.
A large steamer was sighted on northerly course. The submarine then heard H.E. of three ships. The submarine was too far to intercept but made an enemy report at 0615 hours.
  13 Jul 1942205016° 05'N, 75° 55'WTwo aircraft were observed through the periscope but no special action taken.
  17 Jul 1942182519° 56'N, 74° 00'WTwo corvettes were sighted on westerly course at a distance of 6-7,000 metres.
  20 Jul 1942110023° 35'N, 69° 55'W
(0) Italian Grid 2123/46.
A tanker escorted by three destroyers was observed steering 250° at about 15 knots, however Giuseppe Finzi was not in a favourable position to attack and they passed out of range.
  23 Jul 19421720-0041/2423° 05'N, 60° 45'W
(0) Approximately.
The Italian submarine Reginaldo Giuliani was encountered and Giuseppe Finzi supplied her with 49 tons of fuel and 5 tons of drinking water.
  27 Jul 1942105030° 45'N, 52° 25'WThe Italian submarine Morosini was encountered and Giuseppe Finzi supplied her with 25 tons of fuel and one ton of lubricating oil. At 0415 hours on 28th July, Finzi was ordered to a new area between 30°05' N, 55°55' W and 30°55' N, 50°05' W.
  29 Jul 19420536+29° 45'N, 54° 45'WA large two-funnel liner was sighted first at 0440 hours, then at 0536 hours. Giuseppe Finzi closed to 2,500 metres and fired three torpedoes (probably 533mm) from the bow tubes, but missed. At 1000-1200 hours on 12th July, the three torpedoes stored on deck containers were transferred to the forward torpedo room.
  7 Aug 1942182543° 00'N, 53° 00'WA smoke was observed on the horizon. The submarine could not close to identify it.
  11 Aug 1942150445° 15'N, 16° 05'WAn enemy bomber was sighted at 3,000 metres and the submarine dived.
  12 Aug 1942085544° 57'N, 12° 40'WAn aircraft was sighted and the submarine dived.
  12 Aug 1942123244° 50'N, 12° 08'WAn aircraft was sighted and the submarine dived.
  13 Aug 1942170544° 20'N, 9° 20'W
(0) Approximately.
Six or seven aircraft were sighted, but no action was taken as they flew at high altitude.
  14 Aug 1942121744° 26'N, 8° 54'WAn aircraft was sighted and the submarine dived.
  15 Aug 1942143544° 25'N, 5° 00'WAn aircraft was sighted and the submarine dived.

Anfossi, Giovenale5 Oct 1942Bordeaux31 Oct 1942BordeauxRefit in Bordeaux.

Amendolia, Angelo14 Nov 19420920Bordeaux14 Nov 19421510Le Verdon55Passage Bordeaux-Le Verdon.

Amendolia, Angelo14 Nov 19421605Le Verdon14 Nov 19421824Le VerdonGyrocompass tests.

Amendolia, Angelo15 Nov 19420855Le Verdon15 Nov 19421852La Pallice73,5Passage Le Verdon-La Pallice.

Amendolia, Angelo18 Nov 19421057La Pallice18 Nov 19421505La Pallice9,3Exercises.

Amendolia, Angelo20 Nov 19421242La Pallice20 Nov 19421602La Pallice2Exercises.

Amendolia, Angelo23 Nov 19420800La Pallice23 Nov 19421530La Pallice9,3Exercises.

9Giudice, Ugo26 Nov 19421000La Pallice22 Dec 19421745Bordeaux4329,5Sailed for patrol off Brazil, but returned due to defects. She carried nineteen torpedoes (eight forward, eight aft and three in external containers) and 314 rounds of 102 mm. At the issue of this patrol, T.V. Arendolia complained that the binoculars on the submarine were old and inadequate and had been repaired frequently.
  3 Dec 1942063837° 01'N, 15° 58'WAn illuminated steamer was observed on 095° course. The submarine chased it but finally gave up at 0815 hours.
  4 Dec 1942140835° 25'N, 17° 38'WA vessel was sighted at distance of 6,000 metres. The submarine closed to 1,000 metres before identifying her as a Spanish tanker of the PLUTON class proceeding on 75° course at 11 knots. The attack was aborted.
  9 Dec 1942154525° 25'N, 29° 14'WA vessel was sighted at distance of 15,000 metres and the submarine closed to attack. She was identified as the Spanish tanker Campuzano (6,320 GRT, built 1932), and the attack was aborted.
  21 Dec 19421035
(0) 183° - Le Verdon - 3.8 miles.
The Sperrerbrecher, which was leading the submarine, detonated a mine and appeared to be sinking until an M-Boot took her in tow. The submarine was later taken in charge from Le Verdon to Pauillac by a minesweeper and two M-Boats.

Rossetto, Mario4 Feb 19431555Bordeaux4 Feb 19431815Pauillac24Passage Bordeaux-Pauillac.

Rossetto, Mario5 Feb 19431350Pauillac5 Feb 19431750Le Verdon27Passage Pauillac-Le Verdon.

Rossetto, Mario6 Feb 19430805Le Verdon6 Feb 19431643La Pallice80Passage Le Verdon-La Pallice.

Rossetto, Mario7 Feb 19431505La Pallice7 Feb 19431845La Pallice2,5Exercises.

Rossetto, Mario9 Feb 19431601La Pallice9 Feb 19431838La Pallice5,4Exercises.

10Rossetto, Mario11 Feb 19431105La Pallice18 Apr 19431048Le Verdon9681Sailed for patrol in Indian Ocean and to supply Da Vinci. The submarine was equipped with METOX.
  14 Feb 1943025945° 07'N, 7° 45'WAn aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
  14 Feb 1943230044° 56'N, 9° 18'WAn aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
  15 Feb 1943051044° 54'N, 9° 35'WAn aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
  15 Feb 1943233044° 45'N, 10° 52'WAn aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
  19 Feb 1943232838° 17'N, 17° 09'WA Portuguese illuminated ship was sighted and the submarine turned away. Following BETASOM's signal of 1930 hours, the submarine proceeded to a Grid delimited by 15°00' N and 16°00' N and by 20°00' W and 21°00' W. On 27th February, another signal ordered her to a square delimited by 12°00' N and 13°00' N and by 02°00' E and 03°00' E.
  18 Mar 1943203811° 47'S, 1° 40'E
(e) 11° 44'S, 1° 44'E
At 2015 hours, a vessel was sighted at a distance of 9,000 metres.

At 2038 hours, Giuseppe Finzi closed to 2,500 metres and fired a single torpedo from a bow tube. This was a surface attack and it missed astern. The target was the British steamer Lulworth Hill (7,628 GRT, built 1940) travelling from Capetown to Freetown.

At 2039 hours, a second torpedo was fired from a bow torpedo from a range of 1,200 metres at Lulworth Hill and again it missed.

At 2040 hours, a third torpedo fired from a bow tube was not more successful. At 2042 hours, Lulworth Hill opened fire with a stern gun and forced the submarine to submerge. At 2215 hours, Giuseppe Finzi sighted Leonardo Da Vinci and informed her about the steamer. A few hours later, Lulworth Hill was sunk by Da Vinci.
  19 Mar 19432158-234012° 30'S, 2° 30'EGiuseppe Finzi met Leonardo Da Vinci and gave her 90 tons of fuel, three torpedoes (450 mm), provisions and lubricating oil. In return, Finzi took from her two survivors from Empress Of Canada (one Italian and one British). They were fortunate as Leonardo Da Vinci would later be lost with all hands.
  28 Mar 19432218
2000 (e)
3° 50'N, 15° 15'WAt 1545 hours, a smoke was sighted on the horizon and Giuseppe Finzi proceeded at full speed to intercept. At 1650 hours, it was observed to be a ship zigzagging at a distance of 20,000 metres on a 020° course. The submarine maneuvered to take a position ahead of the target after dark.

At 2218 hours, a pair of bow torpedoes (533mm?) were fired from 700 metres but they missed.

This was the Greek steamer Granicos (3,689 GRT, built 1916) on passage from Rio de Janeiro to Freetown.

At 2219 hours, a second pair of bow torpedoes (533mm and 450mm?) were fired from 700 metres. One torpedo hit and the Greek ship sank. Thirty of her crew were killed. A Portuguese (or Brazilian?) survivor was picked up by the Italian submarine. Another survivor, Nikolaos Antilis, was found on a raft on 4th April in 01°00' S, 17°00' W.
  30 Mar 194300574° 08'N, 17° 35'WA smoke was sighted at 1150 hours on 29th March 1943 in 05°15' N, 17°03' W. The submarine maneuvered to intercept after dark.

At 0057 hours on the 30th, Giuseppe Finzi fired a pair of torpedoes from a distance of 2,700 metres. They missed.

The target was the British Celtic Star (5,575 GRT, built 1918) on a voyage from Manchester and Greenock to Montevideo and Buenos Aires.

At 0058 hours, a second pair of torpedoes was fired and this time both hit after 2 minutes and 10 seconds. Celtic Star sank at 0112 hours. Two men were killed. A Canadian G. Paatinson was captured by the submarine. HMS Fandango, HMS Aimwell and HMS Wastwater searched for survivors and sixty-three were recovered (also reported as sixty-six).
  1 Apr 194308409° 25'N, 21° 50'WAn aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
  8 Apr 1943232526° 10'N, 21° 56'WAn illuminated ship was observed from a distance of 15,000 metres. The submarine closed to 1,500 metres and identified her as a Spanish vessel steering 230°, 8 knots. The submarine turned away.
  11 Apr 1943065536° 22'N, 16° 34'WAn aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
  12 Apr 1943063536° 28'N, 15° 21'WAn aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
  12 Apr 1943184539° 28'N, 14° 47'WA small tanker was sighted at 18,000 metres. After closing, it was believed to a neutral vessel on a 270° and the submarine turned away.
  14 Apr 1943061842° 29'N, 12° 00'WAn aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
  15 Apr 1943030942° 53'N, 9° 37'WAn aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
  15 Apr 19431358What appeared to be a torpedo wake was observed but no action was taken.
  15 Apr 1943185044° 27'N, 8° 17'WAn unknown ship was sighted at a distance of 15,000 metres and the submarine turned away.
  16 Apr 1943045244° 35'N, 6° 40'WAn aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
  18 Apr 1943074145° 37'N, 1° 29'WAs the submarine was proceeding in the wake of a Sperrbrecher, a mine detonated under her and near the auxiliary motors. The submarine suffered some damage but managed to reach her base without further incidents. The mine was possibly laid by HMS Cachalot on 28th March 1941 (F.D.32) but was more probably an air-laid magnetic mine.

10bRossetto, Mario18 Apr 19431245Le Verdon18 Apr 19431919BordeauxPassage Le Verdon-Bordeaux.
  18 Apr 1943074145° 37'N, 1° 29'WAs the submarine was proceeding in the wake of a Sperrbrecher, a mine detonated under her and near the auxiliary motors. The submarine suffered some damage but managed to reach her base without further incidents. The mine was possibly laid by HMS Cachalot on 28th March 1941 (F.D.32) but was more probably an air-laid magnetic mine.

Corsi, Ferdinando22 May 1943Bordeaux9 Jun 1943BordeauxRefit in Bordeaux (change in command).

Crepas, Alberto10 Jun 1943Bordeaux14 Jun 1943BordeauxRefit in Bordeaux (change in command).

Dellino, Mariano1 Jul 19431755Bordeaux1 Jul 19431914Ile Verte12,3Passage to Ile Verte for trials.

Dellino, Mariano1 Jul 19431755Bordeaux1 Jul 19431914Ile Verte12,3Passage to Ile Verte for trials.

Dellino, Mariano30 Jul 19431710Bordeaux30 Jul 19432140Le Verdon42,8Passage Bordeaux-Le Verdon to sail for a war patrol.

Dellino, Mariano31 Jul 19430903Le Verdon31 Jul 19431325Le Verdon18,2Exercises.

Dellino, Mariano9 Sep 19430820Le Verdon9 Sep 19431221Bordeaux42,8Passage Le Verdon-Bordeaux. Seized by the Germans and renamed UIT-21, but it was decided not to use her.

134 entries. 49 total patrol entries (10 marked as war patrols) and 99 events.

Events

GH 09.03.2021: This table kept here until we make fix the possible missing events in table above

CommanderDateTimePositionDescription
Alberto Dominici10 Jun 1940(o) East of Gibraltar.All the officers and eighteen ratings suffered from intoxication due to Methylene Chloride. The problem was quickly identified, the submarine surfaced to ventilate and all the bottles of Methylene Chloride disposed of. Most of the men recovered after four or five days, except for two men who took ten days.
Alberto Dominici12 Jun 19400253
0412 (e)
(e) 35.48 N, 05.10 W
(o) 160° - Point Almina - 6 miles.
From a distance of 1,200-1,500 metres, Giuseppe Finzi sighted the shape of a destroyer coming straight at her and dived immediately. The first depth charges exploded as the submarine was a a depth of 30 before settling on the bottom at 108 metres. This was the destroyer HMS Watchman, which claimed the submarine sunk or badly damaged, but Finzi suffered only minor damages. Later in the day, the armed trawler HMT Stella Sirius also reported a contact off Almina Point.
Alberto Dominici23 Jun 19401610(o) North of Teneriffe (Canary Islands).A French sloop of the BOUGAINVILLE class was sighted but the submarine could not gain an attack position.
Alberto Dominici9 Jul 19401650(o) West of Sardinia.The submarine was suddenly attacked by an aircraft, believed to be British, which dropped a single bomb. It exploded very near the hull, but caused no damage. The aircraft may have been Italian as no RAF bomber reported such an attack.
Alberto Dominici14 Sep 1940074036.08 N, 09.25 W
An aircraft was sighted at long range and the submarine dived.
Alberto Dominici15 Sep 19401202-121137.23 N, 10.01 W
At 1125 hours, the submarine sighted an escort vessel and dived. The vessel dropped seven depth-charges between 1202 and 1211 hours. The submarine escaped unscathed.
Alberto Dominici30 Oct 1940134556.30 N, 18.09 W
A 6-8,000-ton steamer armed with two guns was observed. The submarine fired one torpedo (533mm) from a bow tube at a distance 1,500-2,000 metres, but missed.
Alberto Dominici30 Oct 19401410-154056.30 N, 18.09 W
(o) Approximately.
The submarine heard H.E. of what must have been an approaching escort vessel, which dropped seven depth-charges at 1430 hours. She dived to 80 meters. Another depth-charge followed at 1523 hours and a final one at 1540 hours, but the submarine was undamaged.
Alberto Dominici6 Nov 1940145259.08 N, 23.02 W
An unknown steamer was sighted at a distance of 10-12,000 metres and Giuseppe Finzi moved to intercept. At 1533 hours, the submarine dived but could not close the range at less than 6,000 meters and lost contact. The executive officer T.V. Girola was highly critical of his commanding officer for the extreme caution the latter exhibited during this action.
Alberto Dominici16 Nov 1940170558.00 N, 19.00 W?
At 1705 hours, Giuseppe Finzi received a signal reporting an escorted convoy of 10-20 steamers at 1415 in 55°35' N, 11°05' W steering 250°, 9 knots. At 1810 hours the submarine turned on a 210° course at 13.5 knots to intercept. In heavy seas and taking water from the stern, the submarine was forced to change course to 330° at 0645 hours on the 17th, and to reduce speed to 4 knots.
Alberto Dominici18 Nov 1940211058.10 N, 19.00 W
(o) Approximately.
At 2110 hours, Giuseppe Finzi received a signal reporting a convoy at 0345 hours on the 18th, in 56°35' N, 13°55' W steering 250°, 14 knots. At 2145 hours, the submarine turned on a 180° course at 8 knots to intercept. The submarine gave up the chase at 1500 hours as it was believed that it had no chance to intercept.
Alberto Dominici22 Nov 1940120557.35 N, 18.52 W
Giuseppe Finzi sighted a lone steamer at 6-7,000 metres and dived to 60 meters to attempt to close submerged using her hydrophones. At 1515 hours, three depth-charges were heard, followed at 1530 hours by another four which detonated closer. Finally, at 1540 hours, the submarine detected the convoy with hydrophones. It was estimated at 10 or 20 steamers, escorted by auxiliary cruisers steering 100° course at a speed of 8 knots. Another fourteen depth-charges were heard between 1610-1615 hours and contact was lost at 1900 hours. At 1950 hours, the submarine surfaced in very poor visibility and made an enemy report.
Alberto Dominici24 Nov 19400000-013058.19 N, 20.17 W
Giuseppe Finzi heard hydrophone effects believed to be from a convoy on a 080° course. The submarine surfaced at 1135 hours and made an enemy report.
Alberto Dominici27 Nov 1940132057.40 N, 18.30 W
A vessel was sighted at a distance of 15,000 metres. The submarine dived immediately and took an intercepting course to attack, but soon gave up the chase as the target was travelling at 15 knots and she could not close the range.
Alberto Dominici27 Nov 1940181557.16 N, 17.37 W
A three-funnelled destroyer was sighted at a distance of 10,000 metres. The submarine submerged to attack but could not stay at periscope depth because of the heavy seas and lost contact.
Alberto Dominici28 Nov 1940051555.20 N, 17.36 W
An unknown vessel was sighted and closed 700-800 metres. It turned out to be a submarine and Finzi turned away.
Alberto Dominici30 Nov 1940051549.57 N, 17.56 W
Giuseppe Finzi sighted an unknown vessel at a distance of 10,000 metres and turned to attack. It was then identified as a submarine and the Italian submarine turned away.
Alberto Dominici1 Mar 19411240(o) At La Pallice.The submarine ran aground as she was returning from exercises and had to be freed with the help of tugs.
Alberto Dominici17 Mar 19410205A destroyer was sighted at a distance of 2,000 metres and she turned toward the submarine who dived to a depth of 60 metres.
Alberto Dominici17 Mar 19410430-200040.00 N, 22.40 W
At 0235 hours, the hydrophones detected noise of vessels steering 135°, 8 knots. At 0430 hours, the submarine surfaced and proceeded at 13.5 knots to search for a convoy from Gibraltar.
Alberto Dominici17 Mar 19412000The submarine having failed to locate the first convoy from Gibraltar turned toward a second convoy. The search went on until 2130 hours on the 18th and again nothing was sighted.
Alberto Dominici24 Mar 19411540An unknown vessel was sighted, which turned out to be Spanish. The submarine aborted the attack.
Alberto Dominici2 Apr 19411750
1800 (e)
26.20 N, 18.50 W
At 1750 hours, a smoke was observed on the horizon and the submarine closed. It was a convoy of ten to fifteen ships escorted by destroyers. This was convoy S.L.69 bound from Freetown for Liverpool. The submarine dived when one of the destroyers, followed by a second, turned toward her. Two depth charges exploded at 1941 hours and a third at 1950 hours, but Giuseppe Finzi escaped damage. The submarine then tried to renew contact with the convoy but at 0900 hours on the 4th, she abandoned the chase. This was the Free French sloop Commandant Dominé (C.C. Jaquelin de la Porte de Vaux), which dropped three depth-charges after being guided by the seaplane from HMS Mauritius.
Ugo Giudice5 Aug 1941210045.12 N, 12.26 W
A derelict mine was sighted. The submarine attempted to destroy it with machine gun fire but was unsuccessful because of the heavy seas. At 0800 hours on the 6th, following orders from BETASOM, the submarine proceeded at 10 knots to 37°45' N, 11°15' W.
Ugo Giudice7 Aug 1941161540.34 N, 12.33 W
An unknown steamer was sighted but left alone as GIUDICE did not wish to disclose his position and resumed proceeding to intercept a convoy.
Ugo Giudice9 Aug 1941230038.12 N, 11.25 W
(o) Approximately.
Giuseppe Finzi was informed by BETASOM that a convoy had sailed from Gibraltar.She was ordered to intercept it in 33°55' N, 09°15' W at 2000 hours on the 10th. The submarine altered course at 12 knots, but later engine defects slowed her down and were repaired. At 1735 hours on the 10th, Finzi received another order to proceed to 36°45' N, 10°15' W, the convoy was in 36°25' N, 08°25' W at 1500 hours on the 10th. A signal from BETASOM, received at 2330 hours on the 10th, ordered her to 36°15' N, 11°15' W. This location was reached at 0715 hours on the 11th with several more signals following until 12th August.
Ugo Giudice12 Aug 1941164038.35 N, 12.55 W
(o) Italian Grid 9502/64.
The enemy convoy was sighted at a distance of 8,000 metres. The submarine was forced to submerge at 1645 hours as one of the escorting destroyers turned toward her. At 2045 hours, she surfaced and tried to catch up with the convoy. At 2235 hours on the 12th, a signal was received from BETASOM reporting the convoy in 38°55' N, 13°25' W and ordering Finzi, Marconi and Veniero to attack it, but Finzi sighted nothing.
Ugo Giudice13 Aug 1941023039.11 N, 14.02 W
An enemy destroyer was sighted at a distance of 3,000 metres and the submarine maneuvered to gain a more favourable position.
Ugo Giudice13 Aug 1941024539.11 N, 14.02 W
A second enemy destroyer was sighted at a distance of 2-3,000 metres and GIUDICE elected to go deep.
Ugo Giudice13 Aug 1941074539.24 N, 14.30 W
An enemy destroyer was sighted at a distance of 4,000 metres and the submarine was forced to submerge.
Ugo Giudice13 Aug 1941151539.24 N, 14.30 W
(o) Approximately.
A submarine was sighted. This was probably Marconi, but is not identified in the patrol report. Recognition signals were exchanged but at 1520 hours, Giuseppe Finzi was forced to submerge by an aircraft.
Ugo Giudice13 Aug 19412000-2045
1755 zone-1 (e)
39.54 N, 15.36 W
(e) 40.19 N, 15.46 W
(o) Italian Grid 5142/46.
Two destroyers were observed to be depth-charging a submarine. These were HMS Faulknor and HMS Wild Swan. Giuseppe Finzi moved away.
Ugo Giudice14 Aug 1941004740.42 N, 15.46 W
Giuseppe Finzi was cruising on the surface, when a destroyer was sighted. The submarine submerged at 0050 hours. Later, the convoy was heard with her hydrophones but she could not get within sighting range.
Ugo Giudice14 Aug 1941080540.48 N, 16.41 W
(o) Approximately.
Two destroyers were sighted in the mist, at a distance of 7-8,000 metres. Giuseppe Finzi submerged and heard depth-charge explosions at 0845, 0858 and 0958 hours but at a distance.
Ugo Giudice14 Aug 19411830The submarine had just surfaced when a destroyer was sighted at a distance of 4,000 metres. She was forced to submerge again and, heard three depth-charges at a distance.
Ugo Giudice19 Aug 19411130-152037.37 N, 19.10 W
(o) Approximately.
A smoke was sighted on the horizon. Finzi gave chase but at 1520 hours, the vessel was identified as Spanish and the submarine turned away.
Ugo Giudice21 Aug 1941140537.08 N, 15.14 W
A steamer was sighted but she turned out to be Portuguese.
Ugo Giudice26 Aug 1941014032.02 N, 13.46 W
A Spanish vessel was sighted steering 020° and no action was taken.
Ugo Giudice26 Aug 1941071531.15 N, 13.56 W
A Spanish vessel was sighted on a northerly course and she was left alone.
Ugo Giudice26 Aug 1941102531.02 N, 14.00 W
An unidentified ship was sighted and the submarine gave chase, but the vessel was fast and escaped.
Ugo Giudice29 Aug 1941174529.26 N, 12.33 W
An unidentified ship was sighted and the submarine gave chase, but lost her in the mist. In the next days, the submarine sighted other ships but they turned out to be either Spanish or Portuguese.
Ugo Giudice11 Dec 1941082535.27 N, 18.25 W
An unknown illuminated steamer was sighted steering 000°-020°. She was probably neutral and C.C. Giudice did not attempt to investigate as his submarine was on a rescue mission.
Ugo Giudice16 Dec 19411315-154014.30 N, 28.30 W
Giuseppe Finzi met with U-129 (KL Nicolai Claussen) carrying survivors from Atlantis and Python and took off seventy survivors and brought them to St. Nazaire.
Ugo Giudice10 Feb 1942120540.43 N, 14.11 W
Giuseppe Finzi sighted two destroyers at a distance of 10,000 metres proceeding on a NW course. One of them turned toward the submarine and the submarine dived. Only two depth-charges were heard, one at 1235 hours and the other at 1247 hours but the destroyer remained in the area for several hours. Apparently she was keeping down the submarine as a convoy was heard at 1700 hours in 40°43' N, 14°18' W. The submarine finally surfaced at 1910 hours.
Ugo Giudice3 Mar 1942133022.06 N, 62.54 W
An unknown aircraft was sighted at 15,000 metres and the submarine dived.
Ugo Giudice4 Mar 1942202223.40 N, 62.22 W
An unidentified tanker was sighted at 10,000 metres steering 160°. The submarine maneuvered to carry out a night attack, but engine defects delayed her and she could not renew contact.
Ugo Giudice5 Mar 1942113824.11 N, 61.33 W
An illuminated steamer was sighted on a SE course at a distance of 8,000 metres. The submarine gave up the chase as she appeared to be neutral.
Ugo Giudice6 Mar 19420308
2110/5 (e)
23.36 N, 62.28 W
(e) 23.35 N, 62.39 W
At 2055 hours on 5th March 1942, a smoke was sighted on the horizon at a range of 10,000 meters in 24°00' N, 61°42' W. It turned out to be a tanker steering 265°.

At 0308 hours on the 6th, Giuseppe Finzi closed to 1,200 metres and , she fired a pair of torpedoes (533mm) from her bow tubes. One torpedo apparently hit amidship and another hit the stern. However, survivors later reported that only one torpedo hit under the bridge.

This was the British Melpomene (ex-French, 7,011 GRT, built 1923) bound from Belfast to New Orleans in convoy O.S.19. The crew began to abandon ship.

At 0337 hours, the submarine fired a third torpedo from a bow tube at Melpomene and hit her again, but she failed to sink.

At 0402 hours, a fourth torpedo was fired and squarely hit Melpomene which finally sank at 0423 hours. The forty-nine men of her crew had taken to three lifeboats and made for San Juan (Puerto Rico). They were all rescued (including three seriously wounded) by the American steamer Idaho.
Ugo Giudice7 Mar 1942015022.42 N, 60.07 W
At 1435 hours on 6th March 1942, GIUDICE sighted a vessel from a distance of 8,000 metres and trailed her with the intention of attacking after dusk.

The attack finally occurred at 0150 hours on the 7th, Giuseppe Finzi firing two bow torpedoes (533mm) and both hit. The vessel was only damaged and the crew began to abandon ship. This was the Swedish Skåne (4528 GRT, built 1921) [also reported as Boren, ex Skåne)

At 0254 hours, a third torpedo was fired and again hit the Swedish Skåne. She was sinking very slowly and the submarine fired 7 rounds to finish her off.

At 0502 hours, gunfire was resumed with another 18 rounds, pumped into her hull rendering the ship in a sinking condition. At 0620 hours, the submarine was forced to dive because of an aircraft with lights on (which was probably a commercial one). An explosion was heard at 0700 hours and Skåne must have sunk at this time. The crew of thirty-six were all saved.

On 8th March, between 1130 and 1700 hours, the submarine reloaded her forward tubes with three torpedoes which were carried on deck.
Ugo Giudice8 Mar 1942173022.42 N, 60.07 W
The submarine was instructed by BETASOM to cede 50 tons of fuel to Morosini. GIUDICE replied that this would significantly curtail the autonomy of Giuseppe Finzi and BETASOM instructed him to cede only 30 tons.
Ugo Giudice11 Mar 1942123023.12 N, 56.22 W
The Italian submarine Morosini was sighted and recognition signals were exchanged. However, at 1250 hours, Morosini sighted a ship in 23°12' N, 56°42' W steering 240° and Giuseppe Finzi turned away to let her carry out an attack.
Ugo Giudice11 Mar 1942165523.03 N, 56.46 W
An unknown steamer was sighted on a 250° course. (possibly Manaqui?). Giuseppe Finzi closed to attack, but then sighted another ship at 1925 hours.
Ugo Giudice11 Mar 1942192522.35 N, 57.25 W
Finzi closed to attack but then sighted Morosini at 2010 and told her of the sightings.
Ugo Giudice12 Mar 19420149A steamer had been sighted at dusk on 11th March and Giuseppe Finzi closed to attack. GIUDICE opted for a stern shot, as he only had one torpedo left in the bow tubes. However, he was beaten to the race by Morosini which torpedoed the steamer first. The target was probably Manaqui (2802 GRT, built 1921) who disappeared without a trace at that time.
Ugo Giudice12 Mar 19421305Giuseppe Finzi closed Morosini to refuel her, as instructed by BETASOM. At 1516 hours, she took her in tow to start the refuelling process and eventually 24 tons were transferred. Finzi then returned home.
Ugo Giudice20 Jun 19421935-224525.15 N, 29.50 W
(o) Italian Grid 2639/26.
Italian submarine Leonardo Da Vinci was first sighted at 1500 hours in 25°15' N, 29°50' W (the actual rendezvous point was 25°05' N, 30°05' W). From 1935 to 2245 hours, Giuseppe Finzi ceded 11 tons of fuel to her.
Ugo Giudice1 Jul 1942123123.30 N, 55.45 W
(o) Italian Grid 7373/15.
The submarine Morosini was encountered and she was to take some fuel from Finzi. At 1231 hours, in heavy seas. the two submarines had a minor collision. The refuelling was postponed to 3 July 1942 and again to 4 July 1942 but the bad weather persisted and it was cancelled.
Ugo Giudice12 Jul 1942233418.05 N, 74.48 W
(o) Italian Grid 4919/15.
A corvette was sighted at 4,000 metres, the submarine took no action.
Ugo Giudice13 Jul 1942051517.35 N, 74.35 W
(o) Italian Grid 3419/44.
A large steamer was sighted on northerly course. The submarine then heard H.E. of three ships. The submarine was too far to intercept but made an enemy report at 0615 hours.
Ugo Giudice13 Jul 1942205016.05 N, 75.55 W
Two aircraft were observed through the periscope but no special action taken.
Ugo Giudice17 Jul 1942182519.56 N, 74.00 W
Two corvettes were sighted on westerly course at a distance of 6-7,000 metres.
Ugo Giudice20 Jul 1942110023.35 N, 69.55 W
(o) Italian Grid 2123/46.
A tanker escorted by three destroyers was observed steering 250° at about 15 knots, however Giuseppe Finzi was not in a favourable position to attack and they passed out of range.
Ugo Giudice23 Jul 19421720-0041/2423.05 N, 60.45 W
(o) Approximately.
The Italian submarine Reginaldo Giuliani was encountered and Giuseppe Finzi supplied her with 49 tons of fuel and 5 tons of drinking water.
Ugo Giudice27 Jul 1942105030.45 N, 52.25 W
The Italian submarine Morosini was encountered and Giuseppe Finzi supplied her with 25 tons of fuel and one ton of lubricating oil. At 0415 hours on 28th July, Finzi was ordered to a new area between 30°05' N, 55°55' W and 30°55' N, 50°05' W.
Ugo Giudice29 Jul 19420536+29.45 N, 54.45 W
A large two-funnel liner was sighted first at 0440 hours, then at 0536 hours. Giuseppe Finzi closed to 2,500 metres and fired three torpedoes (probably 533mm) from the bow tubes, but missed. At 1000-1200 hours on 12th July, the three torpedoes stored on deck containers were transferred to the forward torpedo room.
Ugo Giudice7 Aug 1942182543.00 N, 53.00 W
A smoke was observed on the horizon. The submarine could not close to identify it.
Ugo Giudice11 Aug 1942150445.15 N, 16.05 W
An enemy bomber was sighted at 3,000 metres and the submarine dived.
Ugo Giudice12 Aug 1942085544.57 N, 12.40 W
An aircraft was sighted and the submarine dived.
Ugo Giudice12 Aug 1942123244.50 N, 12.08 W
An aircraft was sighted and the submarine dived.
Ugo Giudice13 Aug 1942170544.20 N, 09.20 W
(o) Approximately.
Six or seven aircraft were sighted, but no action was taken as they flew at high altitude.
Ugo Giudice14 Aug 1942121744.26 N, 08.54 W
An aircraft was sighted and the submarine dived.
Ugo Giudice15 Aug 1942143544.25 N, 05.00 W
An aircraft was sighted and the submarine dived.
Ugo Giudice3 Dec 1942063837.01 N, 15.58 W
An illuminated steamer was observed on 095° course. The submarine chased it but finally gave up at 0815 hours.
Ugo Giudice4 Dec 1942140835.25 N, 17.38 W
A vessel was sighted at distance of 6,000 metres. The submarine closed to 1,000 metres before identifying her as a Spanish tanker of the PLUTON class proceeding on 75° course at 11 knots. The attack was aborted.
Ugo Giudice9 Dec 1942154525.25 N, 29.14 W
A vessel was sighted at distance of 15,000 metres and the submarine closed to attack. She was identified as the Spanish tanker Campuzano (6,320 GRT, built 1932), and the attack was aborted.
Ugo Giudice21 Dec 19421035(o) 183° - Le Verdon - 3.8 miles.The Sperrerbrecher, which was leading the submarine, detonated a mine and appeared to be sinking until an M-Boot took her in tow. The submarine was later taken in charge from Le Verdon to Pauillac by a minesweeper and two M-Boats.
Mario Rossetto14 Feb 1943025945.07 N, 07.45 W
An aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
Mario Rossetto14 Feb 1943230044.56 N, 09.18 W
An aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
Mario Rossetto15 Feb 1943051044.54 N, 09.35 W
An aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
Mario Rossetto15 Feb 1943233044.45 N, 10.52 W
An aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
Mario Rossetto19 Feb 1943232838.17 N, 17.09 W
A Portuguese illuminated ship was sighted and the submarine turned away. Following BETASOM's signal of 1930 hours, the submarine proceeded to a Grid delimited by 15°00' N and 16°00' N and by 20°00' W and 21°00' W. On 27th February, another signal ordered her to a square delimited by 12°00' N and 13°00' N and by 02°00' E and 03°00' E.
Mario Rossetto18 Mar 1943203811.47 S, 01.40 E
(e) 11.44 S, 01.44 E
At 2015 hours, a vessel was sighted at a distance of 9,000 metres.

At 2038 hours, Giuseppe Finzi closed to 2,500 metres and fired a single torpedo from a bow tube. This was a surface attack and it missed astern. The target was the British steamer Lulworth Hill (7,628 GRT, built 1940) travelling from Capetown to Freetown.

At 2039 hours, a second torpedo was fired from a bow torpedo from a range of 1,200 metres at Lulworth Hill and again it missed.

At 2040 hours, a third torpedo fired from a bow tube was not more successful. At 2042 hours, Lulworth Hill opened fire with a stern gun and forced the submarine to submerge. At 2215 hours, Giuseppe Finzi sighted Leonardo Da Vinci and informed her about the steamer. A few hours later, Lulworth Hill was sunk by Da Vinci.
Mario Rossetto19 Mar 19432158-234012.30 S, 02.30 E
Giuseppe Finzi met Leonardo Da Vinci and gave her 90 tons of fuel, three torpedoes (450 mm), provisions and lubricating oil. In return, Finzi took from her two survivors from Empress Of Canada (one Italian and one British). They were fortunate as Leonardo Da Vinci would later be lost with all hands.
Mario Rossetto28 Mar 19432218
2000 (e)
03.50 N, 15.15 W
(e) 00.00 N, 16.30 W
At 1545 hours, a smoke was sighted on the horizon and Giuseppe Finzi proceeded at full speed to intercept. At 1650 hours, it was observed to be a ship zigzagging at a distance of 20,000 metres on a 020° course. The submarine maneuvered to take a position ahead of the target after dark.

At 2218 hours, a pair of bow torpedoes (533mm?) were fired from 700 metres but they missed.

This was the Greek steamer Granicos (3,689 GRT, built 1916) on passage from Rio de Janeiro to Freetown.

At 2219 hours, a second pair of bow torpedoes (533mm and 450mm?) were fired from 700 metres. One torpedo hit and the Greek ship sank. Thirty of her crew were killed. A Portuguese (or Brazilian?) survivor was picked up by the Italian submarine. Another survivor, Nikolaos Antilis, was found on a raft on 4th April in 01°00' S, 17°00' W.
Mario Rossetto30 Mar 1943005704.08 N, 17.35 W
A smoke was sighted at 1150 hours on 29th March 1943 in 05°15' N, 17°03' W. The submarine maneuvered to intercept after dark.

At 0057 hours on the 30th, Giuseppe Finzi fired a pair of torpedoes from a distance of 2,700 metres. They missed.

The target was the British Celtic Star (5,575 GRT, built 1918) on a voyage from Manchester and Greenock to Montevideo and Buenos Aires.

At 0058 hours, a second pair of torpedoes was fired and this time both hit after 2 minutes and 10 seconds. Celtic Star sank at 0112 hours. Two men were killed. A Canadian G. Paatinson was captured by the submarine. HMS Fandango, HMS Aimwell and HMS Wastwater searched for survivors and sixty-three were recovered (also reported as sixty-six).
Mario Rossetto1 Apr 1943084009.25 N, 21.50 W
An aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
Mario Rossetto8 Apr 1943232526.10 N, 21.56 W
An illuminated ship was observed from a distance of 15,000 metres. The submarine closed to 1,500 metres and identified her as a Spanish vessel steering 230°, 8 knots. The submarine turned away.
Mario Rossetto11 Apr 1943065536.22 N, 16.34 W
An aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
Mario Rossetto12 Apr 1943063536.28 N, 15.21 W
An aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
Mario Rossetto12 Apr 1943184539.28 N, 14.47 W
A small tanker was sighted at 18,000 metres. After closing, it was believed to a neutral vessel on a 270° and the submarine turned away.
Mario Rossetto14 Apr 1943061842.29 N, 12.00 W
An aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
Mario Rossetto15 Apr 1943030942.53 N, 09.37 W
An aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
Mario Rossetto15 Apr 19431358What appeared to be a torpedo wake was observed but no action was taken.
Mario Rossetto15 Apr 1943185044.27 N, 08.17 W
An unknown ship was sighted at a distance of 15,000 metres and the submarine turned away.
Mario Rossetto16 Apr 1943045244.35 N, 06.40 W
An aircraft was detected with Metox and the submarine dived.
Mario Rossetto18 Apr 1943074145.37 N, 01.29 W
As the submarine was proceeding in the wake of a Sperrbrecher, a mine detonated under her and near the auxiliary motors. The submarine suffered some damage but managed to reach her base without further incidents. The mine was possibly laid by HMS Cachalot on 28th March 1941 (F.D.32) but was more probably an air-laid magnetic mine.

All Italian submarines