Allied Warships

HMS Sealion (N 72)

Submarine of the S class

NavyThe Royal Navy
TypeSubmarine
ClassS 
PennantN 72 
Built byCammell Laird Shipyard (Birkenhead, U.K.) 
Ordered23 Dec 1932 
Laid down16 May 1933 
Launched16 Mar 1934 
Commissioned21 Dec 1934 
End service 
History

Paid off on 15 November 1944. Scuttled as Asdic target off Isle of Arran, Scotland on 3 March 1945.

 

Commands listed for HMS Sealion (N 72)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Lt.Cdr. Benjamin Bryant, RN3 Sep 193831 Jan 1940
2Lt.Cdr. Christopher Haynes Hutchinson, RN31 Jan 1940Feb 1940
3Cdr. George Walter Gillow Simpson, RNFeb 1940Feb 1940
4Lt.Cdr. Benjamin Bryant, RNFeb 194012 Oct 1941
5Lt. George Robson Colvin, RN12 Oct 1941Apr 1942
6Lt. David Stuart McNeile Verschoyle-Campbell, DSC, RNApr 1942Jul 1942
7Lt. Douglas Lambert, DSC, RNJul 194212 Jan 1943
8Lt. David Stuart McNeile Verschoyle-Campbell, DSC, RN12 Jan 194317 Mar 1943
9Lt. Norman Jack Coe, DSC, RNR17 Mar 194312 Jan 1944
10Lt. Charles Alexander Jacomb Nicoll, RN12 Jan 194417 Jan 1944
11Lt.Cdr. John Bertram de Betham Kershaw, DSO, RN17 Jan 1944Jan 44 ?
12Lt. Norman Jack Coe, DSC, RNRJan 44 ?2 Mar 1944
13Lt. Peter Edward Newstead, DSC, RN2 Mar 1944mid 1944
14Lt. Roger Martin Stafford, RNmid 194415 Nov 1944

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Notable events involving Sealion include:


The history of HMS Sealion as compiled on this page is extracted from the patrol reports and logbooks of this submarine.

This page was last updated in October 2017.

1 Sep 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) conducted exercises off Malta. (1)

7 Sep 1939
During 7 and 8 September 1939, HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN), conducted exercises off Malta. These included night exercises. (1)

16 Sep 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) conducted exercises off Malta together with HMS Otway (Cdr. H.R. Conway, RN). (1)

18 Sep 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) conducted exercises off Malta together with HMS Porpoise (Cdr. G.W.G. Simpson, RN) and HMS Shark (Lt. P.N. Buckley, RN). (1)

21 Sep 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) conducted exercises off Malta together with HMS Cachalot (Lt.Cdr. S.W.F. Bennetts, RN). (1)

26 Sep 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) conducted exercises off Malta together with HMS Shark (Lt. P.N. Buckley, RN). (1)

27 Sep 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) conducted exercises off Malta together with HMS Shark (Lt. P.N. Buckley, RN). (1)

4 Oct 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) conducted exercises off Malta together with HMS Shark (Lt. P.N. Buckley, RN). (2)

5 Oct 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) conducted A/S exercises off Malta together with HMS Afridi (Capt. G.H. Creswell, DSC, RN). (2)

6 Oct 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) conducted exercises off Malta. (2)

11 Oct 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) departed Malta for Gibraltar. Sealion was to proceed to the U.K.

For the daily positions of HMS Sealion during the passage during to the U.K. see the map below.

(2)

15 Oct 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) arrived at Gibraltar. (2)

16 Oct 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) departed Gibraltar for Portsmouth. She made the passage together with HMS Salmon (Lt.Cdr. E.O. Bickford, RN), HMS Shark (Lt. P.N. Buckley, RN) and HMS Snapper (Lt. W.D.A. King, RN). (2)

22 Oct 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) arrived at Portsmouth. (2)

28 Oct 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) departed Portsmouth for her 1st war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the North Sea (Dogger Bank area).

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

6 Nov 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) fires 6 torpedoes against German U-boat U-21 off the Dogger Bank in position 55°10'N, 02°11'E. All torpedoes fired missed their target.

(All times are zone -1)
0931 hours - The officer of the watch (Lt. Meeke, RN) sighted a U-boat very close. Depth keeping was very difficult in the rough seas. Started attack.

0944 hours - Fired six torpedoes from a range of about 3000 yards.

0946 hours - Heard a torpedo explosion. Shortly afterwards sighted the conning tower of a U-boat ahead. Surfaced and manned the deck gun. It was however not possible to engage the enemy with the deck gun due to the heavy seas. (3)

7 Nov 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) ended her 1st war patrol at Rosyth. (3)

12 Nov 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) departed Rosyth for Sheerness. She made the passage together with HMS Shark (Lt. P.N. Buckley, RN), HMS Snapper (Lt. W.D.A. King, RN) and HMS Sunfish (Lt.Cdr. J.E. Slaughter, RN). They were escorted by HMS Flamingo (Cdr. J.H. Huntley, RN) until 0900/13 when HMS Boadicea (Lt.Cdr. G.B. Kingdon, RN) took over the escort. (4)

14 Nov 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) arrived at Sheerness. She shifted to the Chatham Dockyard later the same day. (4)

15 Nov 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) was docked at Chatham. (4)

23 Nov 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) was undocked. (4)

24 Nov 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) departed the Chatham Dockyard for Harwich. (4)

25 Nov 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) arrived at Harwich. (4)

12 Dec 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) departed Harwich for her 2nd war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the North Sea.

For the daily positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

27 Dec 1939
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) ended her 2nd war patrol at Harwich. (3)

8 Jan 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) departed Harwich for her 3rd war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the North Sea.

For the daily positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

22 Jan 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) ended her 3rd war patrol at Harwich. (3)

8 Feb 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. G.W.G. Simpson, RN in command temporary as Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN was sick) departed Harwich for her 4th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the North Sea to the north of Terschelling, the Netherlands.

For the daily positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

18 Feb 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. G.W.G. Simpson, RN) ended her 4th war patrol at Harwich. (3)

5 Mar 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) departed Harwich for her 5th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the North Sea near Texel, the Netherlands.

No log is available for this period so no map can be displayed. (3)

7 Mar 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) was ordered to patrol to the north of Terschelling, the Netherlands and even later she moved to patrol to the north-west of Heligoland. (3)

12 Mar 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) was detected, hunted and depth charged by a German armed trawler about 25 nautical miles to the north-west of Heligoland. No damage was done to Sealion and she retired from the area.

0925 hours - Sighted a merchant vessel in the mist in position 54°25'N, 07°17'E. Started an attack. Two tubes were brought to the ready. During the attack it was seen that the target was a trawler. It was a large trawler with a gun mounted forward. Fire was witheld as it was thought she might be escorted 'bigger prey' but nothing else was sighted.

1030 hours - The trawler turned back so started another attack. This prooved to be very difficult as the target stopped and turned a lot. Another trawler was sighted in the mist from time to time.

1115 hours - Two loud explosions shuddered the boat.

1123 hours - The nearest trawler fired a red Very's light. It was thought that Sealion had been detected and Lt.Cdr. Bryant decided to retire from the area to the westward. (3)

15 Mar 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) ended her 5th war patrol at Harwich. (3)

1 Apr 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) departed Harwich for her 6th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol off southern Norway. Later she moved to the Kattegat.

No log is available for this period so no map can be displayed. (3)

11 Apr 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) torpedoed and sank the German merchant August Leonhard (2593 GRT, built 1922) in the Skagerrak in position 56°29'N, 11°43'E.

1600 hours - Sighted grey upperworks to the eastward. Turned and closed at high speed.

1615 hours - Identified the target as a merchant vessel. Continued to close at high speed.

1644 hours - Identified the target as German, started attack.

1648 hours - Fired two torpedoes from 2700 yards. The first torpedo hit the target abaft the funnel. The target settled quickly by the stern. Sealion then retired to the east. (3)

16 Apr 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) was bombed by an aircraft in the central North Sea sustaining some minor damage.

1246 hours - In position 55°56'N, 03°23'E sighted an aircraft on the port quarter. The aircraft turned towards. Challenged.

1247 hours - Having received no reply, dived.

1248 hours - With 45 feet on the gauge 3 or 4 bombs exploded close causing some damage. (3)

18 Apr 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) ended her 6th war patrol at Harwich. (3)

28 Apr 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, RN) departed Harwich for her 7th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Skagerrak / Kattegat.

No log is available for this period so no map can be displayed. (3)

6 May 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) attacked the German transports Moltkefels (7862 GRT, built 1940) and Neidenfels (7838 GRT, built 1939) with 6 torpedoes about 19 nautical miles south-west of Vaderob in position 58°30'N, 10°30'E. The torpedoes missed their target. Both transports were in convoy and were escorted by ships from the 15th Minesweeper Flotilla, including M 1508 and M 1504.

1345 hours - Sighted a convoy of two large transports screened by 5 or 6 A/S vessels. The were passing to the westward on a course of 160°. Range was about 7000 yards. Started attack.

1400 hours - Fired six torpedoes from a range of about 6000 yards. No hits were obtained. (3)

16 May 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) ended her 7th war patrol at Harwich. (3)

26 May 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) departed Harwich for her 8th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the North Sea.

No log is available for this period so no map can be displayed. (3)

3 Jun 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) ended her 8th war patrol at Rosyth. (3)

11 Jun 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) conducted exercises off Rosyth together with HMS Snapper (Lt. W.D.A. King, DSO, RN), HMS Salmon (Cdr. E.O. Bickford, DSO, RN) and HMS White Bear (Capt. R. Gill, RD, RNR). (5)

12 Jun 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) was docked at Rosyth. (5)

14 Jun 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) was undocked. (5)

25 Jun 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) departed Rosyth for her 9th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Skagerrak. Before proceeding on patrol two practice attacks were made on HMS Winchester (Lt.Cdr. S.E. Crewe-Read, RN).

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

1 Jul 1940
HMS Sealion (Lt.Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) departed her patrol area in the Skagerrak for a new patrol area off the south coast of Norway. (3)

3 Jul 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) fires 6 torpedoes against a German convoy off the Boknafjord, Norway. None of the torpedoes found it's target and Sealion was heavily depth charged following this failed attack.

The ship attacked was most heavily escorted and was the Norwegian Cygnus (1334 GRT, built 1921, offsite link). She was escorted by the German auxiliary subchasers UJ 123, UJ 124 and UJ 127 as well was the auxiliary patrol vessels V 1101, V 1102, V 1103 and V 1104.

Four boats of the 18th MS Flotilla were either patrolling in the area or were part of the escort as well. These were M-1803, M-1805, M-1806 and M-1807.

1520 hours - When the rain cleared a convoy was sighted. Six merchant vessels were sighted with an escort of nine trawlers. Started attack.

1545 hours - In position 58°25'N, 05°15'E fired six torpedoes from 5500 yards. The target was the leading merchant vessel of a bunch of three merchants and four A/S trawlers. No hits were obtained.

1552 hours - Returned to periscope depth. Saw the convoy to have altered course to evade the torpedoes. Also and aircraft was seen patrolling.

1600 hours - While returning to 60 feet to retired the aircraft dropped two depth charges. Sealion's bow was flung up and drastic action had to be taken to prevent the submarine from broaching. The aircraft then dropped another two depth charges. Some of the escorts now also joined in the hunt. Until 1642 hours a total of 34 depth charges were counted.

1751 hours - The hunt now appeared to have ceased. Started to return to periscope depth. (3)

8 Jul 1940
In the afternoon, HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) fired a torpedo at the beached wreck of the German merchant Palime (2863 GRT, built 1937) off Obrestadt. The Palime was beached after hitting a mine on 5 June 1940 that was laid by HMS Narwhal. The torpedo failed to run properly and it missed. (3)

11 Jul 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) ended her 9th war patrol at Rosyth. (3)

27 Jul 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) departed Rosyth for her 10th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol off southern Norway.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

29 Jul 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) attacks German U-boat U-62 with torpedoes (that miss) and then with gunfire south-west of Stavanger, Norway in position 58°27'N, 04°24'E.

2041 hours - The Officer of the Watch reported a U-boat crossing our stern. A dark green U-boat was seen to pass very close, at 350 yards. Enemy course was 190°.

2048 hours - Three tubes were now ready. Enemy course was now 210°. Range was 2500 yards and on an extremely broad track.

2049 hours - Fired three torpedoes from 3000 yards.

2054 hours - It was now evident that the torpedoes had missed. Surfaced for gun action in position 58°27'N, 04°24'E. After the third round the enemy dived. (3)

4 Aug 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) torpedoed and sank the Norwegian merchant Toran (3318 GRT, offsite link) off Homborsund, Norway in position 58°17'N, 08°38'E.

1515 hours - Sighted a respectable sized marchant vessel of about 1500 - 2000 tons, inshore. Started attack.

1546 hours - Fired two torpedoes, one hit just aft of amidships. Decided to retire immediately from the area given the fact that the batteries were getting low on power. (3)

6 Aug 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) fires four torpedoes against the German merchant Cläre Hugo Stinnes (5295 GRT, built 1935) off Kristiansand, Norway in position 57°51'N, 07°24'E. All torpedoes missed their target.

1404 hours - Sighted smoke to the west-south-west. Turned to close. Noted that the smoke was moving east.

1406 hours - Sighted masts. Continued to run to the southward to intercept.

1428 hours - By now the convoy was seen to be made up of two large and two small merchant vessels. A number of A/S vessels were also seen.

1506 hours - A total of four torpedoes were fired but two appeared not to run correctly.

1512 hours - The submerged Sealion is rammed by one of the escorts, this was UJ 123, heavy damaging her periscope shears. (3)

10 Aug 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) ended her 10th war patrol at Rosyth. (3)

13 Aug 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) shifted from Rosyth to Newcastle where Sealion was to be refitted at the Swan Hunter shipyard. (6)

14 Aug 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) was docked at Newcastle. (6)

22 Oct 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) was undocked. She then continued her refit at Newcastle. (7)

1 Nov 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) departed Newcastle for Rosyth. En-route trials were performed. (8)

3 Nov 1940
With her post-refit trials completed, HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) arrived at Rosyth. (8)

7 Nov 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) conducted exercises off Rosyth. (8)

8 Nov 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) conducted exercises off Rosyth together with HMS White Bear (Cdr. (Retd.) C.C. Flemming, RN). (8)

10 Nov 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) was docked at Rosyth. (8)

11 Nov 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) was undocked. (8)

13 Nov 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) shifted from Rosyth to Blyth. (8)

21 Nov 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) departed Blyth for her 11th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol off Utvaer, Norway.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

25 Nov 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) attacked a large enemy tanker with two torpedoes about 10 nautical miles west of the Utvaer lighthouse.

This was possibly the German naval tanker Adria (6358 GRT, built 1927).

1103 hours - Sighted a vessel bearing 102°. Altered course to attack but while doing so the target was lost in the rain.

1107 hours - Sighted the target again. It was seen to be a big oiler. Turned again and one again lost the target in the rain but the target HE was clearly picked up.

1112 hours - In approximate position 61°01'N, 04°04'E fired two torpedoes from about 4000 yards but the target was still barely visible and a good setup could not be made. Both torpedoes missed. (3)

6 Dec 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) ended her 11th war patrol at Blyth. (3)

20 Dec 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) conducted exercises off Blyth. (9)

22 Dec 1940
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) departed Blyth for her 12th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol between Stadlanded and Fro Havet, Norway.

For the daily positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

6 Jan 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) ended her 12th war patrol at Blyth. (3)

25 Jan 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) conducted exercises off Blyth. (10)

26 Jan 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) departed Blyth for her 13th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol off Stadlanded, Norway.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

1 Feb 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) attacked a convoy made up of the German merchant vessels Harm Fritzen (4818 GRT, built 1915) and Falkenfels (6318 GRT, built 1921). They were escorted by the auxiliary patrol vessel Blitz north of Stadt, Norway. A total of six torpedoes were fired but no hits were obtained. Position was approximately 62°13'N, 05°08'E.

1415 hours - Sighted two merchant vessels, thought to be 4000-5000 each, rounding the north-west corner of Stadt.

1418 hours - The leading ship changed course putting Sealion right ahead. There was a close screen of R-boats of which at least five were seen. Started attack.

1446 hours - Fired three torpedoes from 2000 yards at the first ship.

1450 hours - Now fired three torpedoes from 1700 yards at the second ship. All six torpedoes fired missed.

1452 hours - Retired to the west. (3)

5 Feb 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) sank the Norwegian merchant vessel Ryfylke (1151 GRT, built 1917 offsite link) off Stadlandet, Norway in approximate position 62°14'N, 05°13'E.

1640 hours - Sighted a steamship to the northward. Started attack.

1657 hours - Fired three torpedoes from 600 yards. The second torpedo hit the target 30 seconds after firing.

1700 hours - Surfaced as the ship appeared to be undamaged. It was also seen that it was much smaller then first thought, about 1500 tons. The ships was then ordered by signal lamp to abandon ships which they did. Fire was then opened with the 3" gun. The ship sank after 32 rounds.

1725 hours - Dived and retired from the area. (3)

10 Feb 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) ended her 13th war patrol at Blyth. (3)

1 Mar 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) departed Blyth for her 14th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol off Stadlanded, Norway.

For the daily positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

15 Mar 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) ended her 14th war patrol at Blyth. (3)

17 Mar 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) was docked at Blyth. (11)

23 Mar 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) was undocked. She departed Blyth for Harwich later the same day. She made the passage together with HMS Sunfish (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN). Off Blyth they made rendez-vous with HMS Undaunted (Lt. J.L. Livesey, RN) and ORP Sokol (Lt.Cdr. B. Karnicki) coming from Dundee. Escort was provided by HMS Leda (Cdr. R.C.V. Ross, DSO, RN).

24 Mar 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) arrived at Harwich. (11)

25 Mar 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) departed Harwich for Portsmouth. Again she made the passage with HMS Sunfish (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN), HMS Undaunted (Lt. J.L. Livesey, RN) and ORP Sokol (Lt.Cdr. B. Karnicki). Escort was now provided by HMS Sheldrake (Cdr. (retired) E.H. Hopkinson, RN). (11)

26 Mar 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) arrived at Portsmouth. (11)

27 Mar 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) departed Portsmouth for her 15th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Bay of Biscay.

For the daily positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

14 Apr 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) ended her 15th war patrol at Portsmouth. (3)

28 Apr 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) departed Portsmouth for her 16th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Bay of Biscay. Before proceeding on patrol on the 30th two days of A/S exercises were to be run off Dartmouth together with trawlers and HMS Mackay (Lt.Cdr. E.C. Coats, RN).

For the daily positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

14 May 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) ended her 16th war patrol at Portsmouth. (3)

18 May 1941

Chase and sinking of the German battleship Bismarck,
18 to 27 May 1941.

Part I.

Departure of the Bismarck from the Baltic.

At 2130B/18 the German battleship Bismarck and the German heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen departed Gotenhafen for an anti-shipping raid in the North Atlantic. The following morning they were joined off Cape Arkona by the German destroyers Z 16 / Friedrich Eckhold and Z 23. They then proceeded through the Great Belt. The four ships were joined by a third destroyer, Z 10 / Hans Lody shortly before midnight on 19 May.

First reports of Bismarck and British dispositions 20-21 May 1941.

On 20 May 1941 two large warships with a strong escort were seen at 1500 hours northward out of the Kattegat. This information originated from the Swedish cruiser Gotland which had passed the Germans off the Swedish coast in the morning. The Naval Attaché at Stockholm received the news at 2100/20 and forwarded it to the Admiralty. At 0900/21 the Bismarck and her consorts entered Kors Fjord, near Bergen, Norway and anchored in nearby fiords. A reconnaissance aircraft flying over Bergen at 1330/21 reported having seen two Hipper class heavy cruisers there. One of these ships was later identified on a photograph as being the Bismarck. This intelligence went out at once to the Home Fleet.

The ships of the Home Fleet were at this time widely dispersed on convoy duties, patrols, etc. Some of the units were ranging as far as Gibraltar and Freetown. The Commander-in-Chief, Admiral Sir John Tovey, was at Scapa Flow in his flagship, HMS King George V (Capt. W.R. Patterson, CVO, RN). With him were her newly commissioned sister ship HMS Prince of Wales (Capt. J.C. Leach, MVO, RN), the battlecruiser HMS Hood (Capt. R. Kerr, CBE, RN, with Vice-Admiral L.E. Holland, CB, RN, onboard), the aircraft carrier HMS Victorious (Capt. H.C. Bovell, RN), the light cruisers HMS Galatea (Capt. E.W.B. Sim, RN), HMS Aurora (Capt. Sir W.G. Agnew, RN), HMS Kenya (Capt. M.M. Denny, CB, RN), HMS Neptune (Capt. R.C. O'Conor, RN) and the destroyers HMS Achates (Lt.Cdr. Viscount Jocelyn, RN), HMS Active (Lt.Cdr. M.W. Tomkinson, RN), HMS Antelope (Lt.Cdr. R.B.N. Hicks, DSO, RN), HMS Anthony (Lt.Cdr. J.M. Hodges, RN), HMS Echo (Lt.Cdr. C.H.deB. Newby, RN), HMS Electra (Cdr. C.W. May, RN), HMS Icarus (Lt.Cdr. C.D. Maud, DSO, RN), HMS Punjabi (Cdr. S.A. Buss, MVO, RN) and HMAS Nestor (Cdr. A.S. Rosenthal, RAN). HMS Victorious was under orders to escort troop convoy WS 8B from the Clyde to the Middle East.

Rear-Admiral W.F. Wake-Walker (commanding the first Cruiser Squadron), with the heavy cruisers HMS Norfolk (Capt. A.J.L. Phillips, RN) (flag) and HMS Suffolk (Capt. R.M. Ellis, RN) was on patrol in the Denmark Straight. The light cruisers HMS Manchester (Capt. H.A. Packer, RN) and HMS Birmingham (Capt. A.C.G. Madden, RN) were patrolling between Iceland and the Faeroes. The battlecruiser HMS Repulse (Capt. Sir W.G. Tennant, CB, MVO, RN) was at the Clyde to escort troop convoy WS 8B.

Action taken by the Commander-in-Chief, Home Fleet

Admiral Tovey took the following action when he received the news the Bismarck had been spotted at Bergen. Vice-Admiral Holland with the Hood, Prince of Wales, Achates, Antelope, Anthony, Echo, Electra and Icarus was ordered to cover Rear Admiral Wake-Walker's cruisers in the Denmark Straight. His force departed Scapa Flow around 0100/22.

HMS Arethusa (Capt. A.C. Chapman, RN), which was taking the Vice-Admiral, Orkneys and Shetlands, to Reykjavik on a visit of inspection, was ordered to remain at Hvalfiord and placed at Rear-Admiral Wake-Walkers disposal. HMS Manchester and HMS Birmingham were ordered to top off with fuel at Skaalefiord and them to resume their patrol. The other ships that remained at Scapa Flow were brought to short notice for steam.

The Free French submarine FFS Minerve (Lt. P.M. Sonneville), which was on patrol off south-west Norway was ordered to proceed to position 61°53'N, 03°15'E and HMS P 31 (Lt. J.B.de B. Kershaw, RN) was ordered to proceed to position 62°08'N, 05°08'E which is to the west of Stadtlandet.

The sailing of HMS Repulse and HMS Victorious with troop convoy WS 8B was cancelled and the ships were placed at the disposal of Admiral Tovey.

A reconnaissance aircraft flying over Bergen reported that the German ships were gone. This information reached Admiral Tovey at 2000/22. HMS Suffolk which had been fuelling at Hvalfiord was ordered to rejoin HMS Norfolk in the Denmark Strait. HMS Arethusa was ordered to join HMS Manchester and HMS Birmingham to form a patrol line between Iceland and the Faeroes. Vice-Admiral Holland, on his way to Iceland was told to cover the patrols in Denmark Strait north of 62°N. Admiral Tovey would cover the patrols south of 62°N.

Commander-in-Chief leaves Scapa Flow on 22 May 1941

The King George V, with Admiral Tovey on board, departed Scapa Flow at 2245/22. With the King George V sailed, HMS Victorious, HMS Galatea, HMS Aurora, HMS Kenya, HMS Hermione (Capt. G.N. Oliver, RN), HMS Windsor (Lt.Cdr. J.M.G. Waldegrave, DSC, RN), HMS Active, HMS Inglefield (Capt. P. Todd, DSO, RN), HMS Intrepid (Cdr. R.C. Gordon, DSO, RN), HMS Punjabi, HMS Lance (Lt.Cdr. R.W.F. Northcott, RN) and HMAS Nestor. HMS Lance however had to return to Scapa Flow due to defects.

At A.M. 23 May they were joined off the Butt of Lewis by HMS Repulse escorted by HMS Legion (Cdr. R.F. Jessel, RN), HMCS Assiniboine (A/Lt.Cdr. J.H. Stubbs, RCN) and HMCS Saguenay (Lt. P.E. Haddon, RCN) coming from the Clyde area.

The Commander-in-Chief was 230 miles north-west of the Butt of Lewis in approximate position 60°20'N, 12°30'W when at 2032/23 a signal came in from HMS Norfolk that she had sighted the Bismarck in the Denmark Strait.

HMS Suffolk and HMS Norfolk made contact with the Bismarck in the Denmark Strait on 23 May 1941.

At 1922/23 HMS Suffolk sighted the Bismarck and Prinz Eugen in position 67°06'N, 24°50'W. They were proceeding to the south-west skirting the edge of the ice in Denmark Strait. HMS Suffolk immediately sent out an enemy report and made for the mist to the south-east. HMS Norfolk then commenced closing and sighted the enemy at 2030 hours. They were only some six nautical miles off and the Bismarck opened fire. HMS Norfolk immediately turned away, was not hit and also sent out an enemy report.

Although HMS Suffolk had sighted the enemy first and also sent the first contact report this was not received by the Commander-in-Chief. The enemy was 600 miles away to the north-westward.

Vice-Admiral Holland had picked up the signal from the Suffolk. He was at that moment about 300 nautical miles away. Course was changed to intercept and speed was increased by his force to 27 knots.

Dispositions, 23 May 1941.

At the Admiralty, when the Norfolk's signal came in, one of the first considerations was to safeguard the convoys at sea. At this time there were eleven crossing the North-Atlantic, six homeward and five outward bound. The most important convoy was troop convoy WS 8B of five ships which had left the Clyde the previous day for the Middle East. She was at this moment escorted by the heavy cruiser HMS Exeter (Capt. O.L. Gordon, MVO, RN), light cruiser (AA cruiser) HMS Cairo (A/Capt. I.R.H. Black, RN) and the destroyers HMS Cossack (Capt. P.L. Vian, DSO, RN), HMS Maori (Cdr. G.H. Stokes, DSC, RN), HMS Zulu (Cdr. H.R. Graham, DSO, RN), ORP Piorun (Cdr. E.J.S. Plawski), HMCS Ottawa (Cdr. E.R. Mainguy, RCN), HMCS Restigouche (Lt.Cdr. H.N. Lay, RCN) and the escort destroyer HMS Eridge (Lt.Cdr. W.F.N. Gregory-Smith, RN). HMS Repulse was also intended to have sailed with this convoy but she had joined the Commander-in-Chief instead.

Force H was sailed around 0200/24 from Gibraltar to protect this important convoy on the passage southwards. Force H was made up of the battlecruiser HMS Renown (Capt Sir R.R. McGrigor, RN), aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal (Capt. L.E.H. Maund, RN), light cruiser HMS Sheffield (Capt. C.A.A. Larcom, RN) and the destroyers HMS Faulknor (Capt. A.F. de Salis, RN), HMS Foresight (Cdr. J.S.C. Salter, RN), HMS Forester (Lt.Cdr. E.B. Tancock, RN), HMS Foxhound (Cdr. G.H. Peters, DSC, RN), HMS Fury (Lt.Cdr. T.C. Robinson, RN) and HMS Hesperus (Lt.Cdr. A.A. Tait, RN).

HMS Norfolk and HMS Suffolk shadowing Bismarck 23 / 24 May 1941.

During the night of 23 / 24 May 1941 HMS Norfolk and HMS Suffolk hung on to the enemy, The Norfolk on their port quarter, Suffolk on their starboard quarter. All through the night they sent signals with updates on the position, course and speed of the enemy. At 0516 hours HMS Norfolk sighted smoke on her port bow and soon HMS Hood and HMS Prince of Wales came in sight.

HMS Hood and HMS Prince of Wales 23 / 24 May 1941.

At 2054/23 the four remaining escorting destroyers were ordered to follow at best speed in the heavy seas if they were unable to keep up with the capital ships which were proceeding at 27 knots. Two destroyers, HMS Antelope and HMS Anthony had been ordered to proceed to Iceland to refuel at 1400/23. The destroyers all managed to keep up for now and at 2318 hours they were ordered to form a screen ahead of both capital ships. At 0008/24 speed was reduced to 25 knots and course was altered to due north at 0017 hours. It was expected that contact with the enemy would be made at any time after 0140/24. It was just now that the cruisers lost contact with the enemy in a snowstorm and for some time no reports were coming in. At 0031 hours the Vice-Admiral signalled to the Prince of Wales that if the enemy was not in sight by 0210 hours he would probably alter course to 180° until the cruisers regained touch. He also signalled that he intended to engage the Bismarck with both capital ships and leave the Prinz Eugen to Norfolk and Suffolk.

The Prince of Wales' Walrus aircraft was ready for catapulting and it was intended to fly it off, but visibility deteriorated and in the end it was defuelled and stowed away at 0140 hours. A signal was then passed to the destroyers that when the capital ships would turn to the south they were to continue northwards searching for the enemy. Course was altered to 200° at 0203/24. As there was now little chance of engaging the enemy before daylight the crews were allowed to rest.

At 0247/24 HMS Suffolk regained touch with the enemy and by 0300 hours reports were coming in again. At 0353 hours HMS Hood increased speed to 28 knots and at 0400/24 the enemy was estimated to be 20 nautical miles to the north-west. By 0430 hours visibility had increased to 12 nautical miles. At 0440 hours orders were given to refuel the Walrus of HMS Prince of Wales but due to delays due to water in the fuel it was not ready when the action began and it was damaged by splinters and eventuelly jettisoned into the sea.

At 0535/24 hours a vessel was seen looming on the horizon to the north-west, it was the Bismarck. She was some 17 nautical miles away bearing 330°. Prinz Eugen was ahead of her but this was not immediately realised and as the silhoutte of the German ships was almost similar the leading ship was most likely thought to be the Bismarck on board HMS Hood.

Battle of the Denmark Strait, action with the Bismarck and Prinz Eugen. Loss of HMS Hood.

At 0537/24 HMS Hood and HMS Prince of Wales were turned together 40° to starboard towards the enemy. At 0549 hours course was altered to 300° and the left hand ship was designated as the target. This was a mistake as this was the Prinz Eugen and not the Bismarck. This was changed to the Bismarck just before fire was opened at 0552 hours. At 0554 hours the Bismarck and Prinz Eugen also opened fire. In the meantime Prince of Wales had also opened fire at 0053 hours. Her first salvo was over. The sixth salvo was a straddle. The Norfolk and Suffolk were too far astern of the enemy to take part in the action.

At 0555 hours Hood and Prince of Wales turned two points to port. This opened up Prince of Wales' A arcs as her ninth salvo was fired.

Shortly before 0605 hours Hood signalled that another turn of two points to port had to be executed. Bismarck had just fired her fifth salvo when the Hood was rent in two by a huge explosion rising apparently between the after funnel and the mainmast. The fore part began to sink seperately, bows up, whilst the after part remained shrouded in a pall of smoke. Three or four minutes later, the Hood had vanished between the waves leaving a vast cloud of smoke drifting away to the leeward. She sank in position 63°20'N, 31°50'W (the wreck was found in 2001 in approximate position 63°22'N, 32°17'W, the exact position has not been released to the public.)

The Prince of Wales altered course to starboard to avoid the wreckage of the Hood. The Bismarck now shifted fire from her main and secondary armament to her. Range was now 18000 yards. Within a very short time she was hit by four 15" and three 6" shells. At 0602 hours a large projectile wrecked the bridge, killing or wounding most of the personnel and about the same time the ship was holed underwater aft. It was decided temporarily to discontinue the action and at 0613 hours HMS Prince of Wales turned away behind a smoke screen. The after turret continued to fire but it soon malfunctioned and was out of action until 0825 hours. When the Prince of Wales ceased firing the range was 14500 yards. She had fired 18 salvos from the main armament and five from the secondary. The Bismarck made no attempt to follow or continue the action. She had also not escaped unscatched and had sustained two severe hits.

Such was the end of the brief engagement. The loss by an unlucky hit of HMS Hood with Vice-Admiral Holland, Captain Kerr and almost her entire ships company was a grievous blow, but a great concentration of forces was gathering behind the Commander-in-Chief, and Admiral Sommerville with Force H was speeding towards him from the south.

The chase

When the Hood blew up, HMS Norfolk was 15 nautical miles to the northward coming up at 28 knots. By 0630/24 she was approaching HMS Prince of Wales and Rear-Admiral Wake-Walker, signalling his intention to keep in touch, told her to follow at best speed. The destroyers that had been with HMS Hood and HMS Prince of Wales were still to the northward. They were ordered to search for survivors but only HMS Electra found three. The Prince of Wales reported that she could do 27 knots and she was told to open out to 10 nautical miles on a bearing of 110° so that HMS Norfolk could fall back on her if she was attacked. Far off the Prinz Eugen could be seen working out to starboard of the Bismarck while the chase continued to the southward.

At 0757 hours, HMS Suffolk reported that the Bismarck had reduced speed and that she appeared to be damaged. Shortly afterwards a Sunderland that had taken off from Iceland reported that the Bismarck was leaving behind a broad track of oil. The Commander-in-Chief with HMS King George V was still a long way off, about 360 nautical miles to the eastward, and Rear-Admiral Wake-Walker on the bridge of HMS Norfolk had to make an important decision, was he to renew the action with the help of the Prince of Wales or was he to make it his business to ensure that the enemy could be intercepted and brought to action by the Commander-in-Chief. A dominant consideration in the matter was the state of the Prince of Wales. Her bridge had been wrecked, she had 400 tons of water in her stern compartments and two of her guns were unserverable and she could go no more then 27 knots. She had only been commissioned recently and barely a week had passed since Captain Leach had reported her ready for service. Her turrets were of a new and an untried model, liable for 'teething' problems and evidently suffering from them, for at the end of the morning her salvoes were falling short and wide. It was doubted if she was a match for the Bismarck in her current state and it was on these grounds that Rear-Admiral Wake-Walker decided that he would confine himself to shadowing and that he would not attempt to force on an action. Soon after 1100/24 visibility decreased and the Bismarck was lost out of sight in mist and rain.

Measures taken by the Admiralty, 24 May 1941.

After the loss of HMS Hood the following measures were taken by the Admiralty. To watch for an attempt by the enemy to return to Germany, HMS Manchester, HMS Birmingham and HMS Arethusa had been ordered at 0120/24 to patrol off the north-east point of Iceland. They were told to proceed to this location with all despatch.

HMS Rodney (Capt. Sir F.H.G. Dalrymple-Hamilton, RN), which with four destroyers was escorting the troopship Britannic (26943 GRT, built 1930) westward, was ordered at 1022/24 to steer west on a closing course and if the Britannic could not keep up she was to leave her with one of the destroyers. Rodney was about 550 nautical miles south-east of the Bismarck. At 1200/24 she left the Britannic in position 55°15'N, 22°25'W and left HMS Eskimo (Lt.Cdr. E.G. Le Geyt, RN) with her. Rodney then proceeded with HMS Somali (Capt. C. Caslon, RN), HMS Tartar (Cdr. L.P. Skipwith, RN) and HMS Mashona (Cdr. W.H. Selby, RN) westwards on a closing course.

Two other capital ships were in the Atlantic; HMS Ramillies (Capt. A.D. Read, RN) and HMS Revenge (Capt. E.R. Archer, RN). The Ramillies was escorting convoy HX 127 from Halifax and was some 900 nautical miles south of the Bismarck. She was ordered at 1144/24 to place herself to the westward of the enemy and leaving her convoy at 1212/24 in position 46°25'N, 35°24'W, she set course to the north. HMS Revenge was ordered to leave Halifax and close the enemy.

Light cruiser HMS Edinburgh (Capt. C.M. Blackman, DSO, RN) was patrolling in the Atlantic between 44°N and 46°N for German merchant shipping and was ordered at 1250/24 to close the enemy and take on relief shadower. At 1430/24 she reported her position as 44°17'N, 23°56'W and she was proceeding on course 320° at 25 knots.

Rear-Admiral Wake-Walker was ordered to continue shadowing even if he ran short of fuel so to bring the Commander-in-Chief into action.

The Bismack turns due south at 1320 hours on 24 May 1941.

In the low state of visibility, HMS Norfolk and HMS Suffolk had to be constantly on the alert against the enemy falling back and attacking them. At 1320/24 the Bismarck and Prinz Eugen altered course to the south and reduced speed. HMS Norfolk sighted them through the rain at a range of only 8 nautical miles. Norfolk had to quickly turn away under the cover of a smoke screen.

It was at 1530/24 when HMS Norfolk received a signal made by the Commander-in-Chief at 0800/24 from which it was estimated that the Commander-in-Chief would be near the enemy at 0100/25. This was later changed to 0900/25.

At 1545/24, Rear-Admiral Wake-Walker was asked by the Admiralty to answer four questions;
1) State the remaining percentage of the Bismarck's fighting efficiency.
2) What amout of ammunition had the Bismarck expended.
3) What are the reasons for the frequent alterations of course by the Bismarck.
4) What are your intentions as regards to the Prince of Wales' re-engaging the Bismarck.

The answers by Rear-Admiral Wake-Walker were as follows.
1) Uncertain but high.
2) About 100 rounds.
3) Unaccountable except as an effort to shake off HMS Norfolk and HMS Suffolk.
4) Consider it wisely for HMS Prince of Wales to not re-engage the Bismarck until other capital ships are in contact, unless interception failed. Doubtful if she has the speed to force an action.

The afternoon drew on towards evening. Still the Bismarck and Prinz Eugen held on to the south while the Norfolk, Suffolk and Prince of Wales were still keeping her in sight.

At 1711/24 in order to delay the enemy if possible, by attacking him from astern, the Prince of Wales was stationed ahead of the Norfolk. The enemy was not in sight from the Norfolk at that time, but the Suffolk was still in contact.

At 1841/24 the Bismarck opened fire on the Suffolk. Her salvoes fell short, but one or two shorts came near enough to cause some minor damage to her hull plating aft. HMS Suffolk replied with nine broadsides before turning away behind a smoke screen.

On seeing the Suffolk being attacked, HMS Norfolk turned towards and she and HMS Prince of Wales opened fire, the latter firing 12 salvoes. By 1856 hours the action was over. Two of the guns on the Prince of Wales malfuntioned again. After the action the cruisers started to zig-zag due to fear for German submarines.

British dispositions at 1800 hours on 24 May 1941.

From the Admiralty at 2025/24, there went out a signal summarising the situation at 1800/24. The position, course and speed of the Bismarck was given as 59°10'N, 36°00'W, 180°, 24 knots with HMS Norfolk, HMS Suffolk and HMS Prince of Wales still in touch. The Commander-in-Chiefs estimated position at 1800/24 was 58°N, 30°W, with HMS King George V and HMS Repulse. HMS Victorious was with the 2nd Cruiser Squadron (HMS Galatea, HMS Aurora, HMS Kenya, HMS Neptune). They had parted company with the Commander-in-Chief at 1509/24. Heavy cruiser HMS London (Capt. R.M. Servaes, CBE, RN) was in position 42°45'N, 20°10'W and had been ordered to leave her convoy and close the enemy. HMS Ramillies was in estimated position 45°45'N, 35°40'W. She had been ordered to place herself to the west of the enemy. HMS Manchester, HMS Birmingham and HMS Arethusa were returning from their position off the north-east of Iceland to refuel. HMS Revenge had left Halifax and was closing convoy HX 128. HMS Edinburgh was in approximate position 45°15'N, 25°10'W. She had been ordered to close and take over stand by shadower.

Evening of 24 May 1941.

At 2031/24 HMS Norfolk received a signal sent by the Commander-in-Chief at 1455/24 stating that aircraft from HMS Victorious might make an attack at 2200/24 and Rear-Admiral Wake-Walker now waited for an air attack which he expected at 2300 hours. By that time Bismarck had been lost from sight but at 2330/24 HMS Norfolk briefly sighted her at a distance of 13 nautical miles. At 2343/24 aircraft from HMS Victorious were seen approaching. They circled round HMS Prince of Wales and HMS Norfolk and the latter was able to direct them to the enemy. At 0009/25 heavy anti-aircraft gunfire was seen and the Bismarck was just visible as the aircraft attacked.

HMS Victorious and the 2nd Cruiser Squadron detached by the Commander-in-Chief.

At 1440/24 the Commander-in-Chief ordered the 2nd Cruiser Squadron (HMS Galatea, HMS Aurora, HMS Kenya, HMS Hermione) and HMS Victorious to a position within 100 nautical miles from Bismarck and to launch a torpedo bombing attack and maintain contact as long as possible. The object of the torpedo bombing attack was to slow the enemy down. On board the Victorious were only 12 Swordfish torpedo bombers and 6 Fulmar fighters. Victorious was only recently commissioned and her crew was still rather green. She had on board a large consignment of crated Hurricane fighters for Malta which were to be delivered to Gibraltar.

At 2208/24 HMS Victorious commenced launching 9 Swordfish in position 58°58'N, 33°17'E. Two minutes later al were on their way to find the Bismarck. The Squadron was led by Lt.Cdr.(A) E. Esmonde, RN.

HMS Victorious aircraft attack the Bismarck.

When the Swordfish took off from HMS Victorious the Bismarck was estimated to be in position 57°09'N, 36°44'W and was steering 180°, speed 24 knots. At 2330/24 they sighted the Bismarck but contact was lost in the bad weater. Shortly afterwards the Swordfish sighted HMS Prince of Wales, HMS Norfolk and HMS Suffolk. HMS Norfolk guided them to the enemy which was 14 nautical miles on her starboard bow. At 2350 hours a vessel was detected ahead and the squadron broke cloud to deliver an attack. To their surprise they found themselves over a United States Coastguard cutter. The Bismarck was 6 nautical miles to the southward and on sighting the aircraft opened up a heavy barrage fire. Lt.Cdr. Esmonde pressed home his attack, 8 of the Swordfish were able to attack, the other had lost contact in the clouds.

The 8 planes attacked with 18" torpedoes, fitted with Duplex pistols set for 31 feet. At midnight three Swordfish attacked simultaneously on the port beam. Three others made a longer approach low down attacking on the port bow a minute later. One took a longer course, attacking on the port quarter. One went round and attacked on the starboard bow a couple of minutes after midnight. At least one hit was claimed on the starboard side abreast the bridge. The Germans however state that no hit was scored but that the violent maneuvering of the ship to avoid the attack, together with the heavy firing by the Bismarck caused the leak in no.2 boiler room to open up. No.2 boiler room was already partially flooded and now had to be abandoned.

All Swordfish from the striking had returned to HMS Victorious by 0201/25. Two Fulmars launched at 2300/24 for shadowing failed to find their ship in the darkness due to the failure of Victorious' homing beacon. Their crews were in the end picked up from the chilly water.

HMS Norfolk and HMS Suffolk loose contact at 0306/25.

While the aircraft from HMS Victorious were making their attack, HMS Norfolk sighted a ship to the south-west and gave the order to open fire. HMS Prince of Wales was able to identify it in time as an American coast guard cutter, but in the movements prepartory to opening fire HMS Norfolk lost touch with the enemy for a time and it was not until 0116/25 that she suddenly sighted the Bismarck only 8 nautical miles away. There followed a brief exchange of fire. HMS Norfolk and HMS Prince of Wales turned to port to bring their guns to bear and the latter was ordered to engage. It was then 0130/25. The Prince of Wales fired two salvoes at 20000 yards by radar. The Bismarck answered with two salvoes which fell a long way short. The light was failing and the enemy was again lost to sight. HMS Suffolk, which had to most reliable RDF set was told to act independently so as to keep in touch.

Around 0306/25 the Suffolk lost touch with the Bismarck. At 0552/25 Rear-Admiral Wake-Walker asked if HMS Victorious could launch aircraft for a search at dawn.

Search measures, 25 May 1941.

With the disappearance of the Bismarck at 0306/25 the first phase of the pursuit ended. The Commander-in-Chief, in HMS King George V with HMS Repulse in company was then about 115 nautical miles to the south-east. At 0616/25, Rear-Admiral Wake-Walker signalled that it was most probable that Bismarck and Prinz Eugen made a 90° turn to the west or turned back and 'cut away' to the eastward astern of the cruisers. Suffolk was already searching to the south-west and Norfolk was waiting for daylight to do the same. Prince of Wales was ordered to join the King George V and Repulse.

Force H was still on a course to intercept the Bismarck while steaming on at 24 knots. The Rear-Admiral commanding the 2nd Cruiser Squadron in HMS Galatea had altered course at 0558/25 to 180° for the position where the enemy was last seen and the Victorious was getting 8 aircraft ready to fly off at 0730/25 for a search to the eastward. This plan however was altered on orders being recieved from the Commander-in-Chief to take the cruisers and Victorious and carry out a search to the north-west of the Bismarck's last reported position. Five Fulmars had already been up during the night, two of them had not returned to the ship. The search therefore had to be undertaken by Swordfish, the only aircraft available. At 0810/25, seven Swordfish were flown off from position 56°18'N, 36°28'W to search between 280° and 040° up to 100 nautical miles. The search was supplemented by Victorious herself as well as the cuisers from the 2nd Cruiser Squadron (Galatea, Aurora, Kenya and Hermione) which were spread some miles apart.

DF position of the Bismarck of 0852/25.

HMS King George V was still proceeding to the south-west when at 1030/25 the Commander-in-Chief recieved a signal from the Admiralty that the Bismarck's position had been obtained by DF (direction finding) and that it indicated that the Bismarck was on a course for the North Sea by the Faeroes-Iceland passage. To counter this move by the enemy the Commander-in-Chief turned round at 1047/25 and made for the Faeroes-Iceland passage at 27 knots. HMS Repulse was no longer in company with HMS King George V, she had been detached at 0906/25 for Newfoundland to refuel. Suffolk also turned to the eastward to search, her search to the south-west had been fruitless. The search by HMS Victorious, her aircraft and the 2nd Cruiser Squadron to the north-west also had no result. Six Swordfish were landed on by 1107/25, one failed to return. HMS Galatea, HMS Aurora and HMS Kenya now turned towards the DF position of the Bismarck to search in that direction. HMS Hermione had to be detached to Hvalfiord, Iceland to refuel as she was by now down to 40%. The other cruisers slowed down to 20 knots to economise their remaining fuel supply wich was also getting low. At this moment HMS King George V had about 60% remaining.

Events during 25 May 1941.

At 1100/25, HMS King George V, HMS Suffolk and HMS Prince of Wales were proceeding to the north-east in the direction of the enemy's DF signal. HMS Rodney was in position 52°34'N, 29°23'W some 280 nautical miles to the south-eastward on the route towards the Bay of Biscay. On receiving the Commander-in-Chiefs signal of 1047/25 she too proceeded to the north-east.

Meanwhile to Admiralty had come to the conclusion that the Bismarck most likely was making for Brest, France. This was signalled to the Commander-in-Chief at 1023/25 to proceed together with Force H and the 1st Cruiser Squadron on that assumption.

In the absence however of definite reports it was difficult to be certain of the position of the enemy. The DF bearings in the morning had not been very definite. At 1100/25, HMS Renown (Force H), was in position 41°30'N, 17°10'W was ordered to act on the assumption the enemy was making for Brest, France. She shaped course accordingly and prepared a comprehensive sheme of air search. At 1108/25, HMS Rodney, was told to act on the assumption that the enemy was making for the Bay of Biscay. At 1244/25 the Flag Officer Submarines ordered six submarines to take up intercepting positions about 120 nautical miles west of Brest. The submarines involved were HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN), HMS Seawolf (Lt. P.L. Field, RN), HMS Sturgeon (Lt.Cdr. D. St. Clair-Ford, RN) from the 5th Submarine Flottilla at Portsmouth, HMS Pandora (Lt.Cdr. J.W. Linton, DSC, RN), which was on passage to the U.K. from the Mediterranean to refit, HMS Tigris (Lt.Cdr. H.F. Bone, DSO, DSC, RN), from the 3rd Submarine Flottilla at Holy Loch and HMS H 44 (Lt. W.N.R. Knox, DSC, RN), a training boat from the 7th Submarine Flotilla at Rothesay which happened to be at Holyhead. Seawolf, Sturgeon and Tigris were already on patrol in the Bay of Biscay, Sealion departed Portsmouth on the 25th as did H 44 but she sailed from Holyhead. Pandora was on passage to the U.K. to refit and was diverted.

At 1320/25 a good DF fix located an enemy unit within a 50 mile radius from position 55°15'N, 32°00'W. This was sent by the Admiralty to the Commander-in-Chief at 1419/25 and it was received at 1530/25. It was only in the evening that it was finally clear to all involved that Bismarck was indeed making for a French port. Air searches had failed to find her during the day. (12)

18 May 1941

Chase and sinking of the German battleship Bismarck,
18 to 27 May 1941.

Part II.

26 May 1941.

By now the question of fuel was becoming acute. For four days ships had been steaming at high speeds and the Commander-in-Chief was faced with the reality of fuel limits. HMS Repulse had already left for Newfoundland, HMS Prince of Wales had by now been sent to Iceland to refuel. HMS Victorious and HMS Suffolk had been forced to reduce speed to economise their fuel.

Coastal Command started air searches along the route towards the Bay of Biscay by long range Catalina flying boats. Lack of fuel was effecting the destroyer screens of the capital ships. There was no screen available for HMS Victorious. The 4th Destroyer Flotilla, escorting troop convoy WS 8B, was ordered at 0159/26 to join the Commander-in-Chief in HMS King George V and HMS Rodney as was HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.P. Thew, RN) which sailed from Londonderry. Leaving the convoy the 4th D.F. proceeded to the north-east. Force H in the meantime was also approaching the immediate area of operations. These forces were to play an important part in the final stages of the chase of the Bismarck.

Force H, 26 May 1941.

HMS Renown, HMS Ark Royal and HMS Sheffield were having a rough passage north in heavy seas, high wind, rain and mist. Their escorting destroyers had already turned back towards Gibraltar at 0900/25. At dawn on the 26th there was half a gale blowing from the north-west. At 0716/26 HMS Ark Royal launched a security patrol in position 48°26'N, 19°13'W to search to the north and to the west just in case the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau had departed Brest to come to the aid of the Bismarck. At 0835/26 there followed an A/S patrol of ten Swordfish. All planes had returned by 0930. None had seen anything.

Bismarck sighted at 1030/26.

It was at 1030/26 that one of the long range Catalina's of the Coastal Command sighted the Bismarck in position 49°30'N, 21°55'W. It was received in HMS King George V at 1043 hours and in HMS Renown in 1038 hours. It placed the enemy well to the westward of the Renown. It was confirmed within the hour when two Swordfish from the Ark Royal which reported the Bismarck in position 49°19'N, 20°52'W some 25 miles east of the position given by the Catalina. The Commander-in-Chief was at that moment about 130 miles to the north of the Bismarck but it was soon clear that the Bismarck had too great a lead to permit her being overtaken unless her speed could be reduced. Nor was the question one merely of distance and speed. The Bismarck was approaching a friendly coast and could run her fuel tanks nearly dry and was sure of air protection, while the British ships would have a long journey back to base in the face of air and submarine attack. HMS Renown was ahead of the Bismarck but it was important that she did not engage the Bismarck unless the latter was already heavily engaged by the better armoured HMS King George V and HMS Rodney.

When the Catalina found the Bismarck at 1030 hours, the 4th Destroyer Flotilla was steering east to join the Commander-in-Chief. They seem to have crossed astern of the enemy's track about 0800/26. The Catalina's report reached Capt. Vian in HMS Cossack at 1054/26 and 'knowing that the Commander-in-Chief would order him to intercept the enemy' Capt. Vian altered course to the south-east.

First attack by aircraft from the Ark Royal.

At 1315/26 HMS Sheffield was detached to the southward with orders to close and shadow the enemy, who was estimated to be 40 nautical miles south-west of the Renown. The visual signal ordering this movement was not repeated to HMS Ark Royal, an omission which had serious consequenses for the aircraft that were to take off did not know that HMS Sheffield had parted company.

At 1450/26 HMS Ark Royal launched a striking force of 14 Swordfish aircraft with the orders to proceed to the south and attack the Bismarck with torpedoes. Weather and cloud conditions were bad and a radar contact was obtained on a ship some 20 nautical miles from the estimated position of the enemy that had been given to the leader shortly before takeoff. At 1550 hours they broke through the clouds and fired 11 torpedoes. Unfortunately the supposed enemy was HMS Sheffield which managed to avoid all torpedoes. The Bismarck at that time was some 15 nautical miles to the southward. The striking force then returned an all aircraft had landed on by 1720/26.

At 1740/26, HMS Sheffield, sighted the Bismarck in position 48°30'N, 17°20'W and took station about 10 nautical miles astern and commenced shadowing the enemy.

Ark Royal's second attack, 2047/26.

The first striking force on its way back sighted the 4th Destroyer Flotilla 20 nautical miles west of Force H. As soon as the aircraft from the first strike had landed they were refuelled and rearmed as fast as possible. Take off started at 1910/26, a total of 15 Swordfish were launched. Reports coming in from HMS Sheffield placed the Bismarck at 167°, 38 nautical miles from the Ark Royal. The striking force was ordered to contact HMS Sheffield who was told to use DF to guide them in.

At 1955/26 HMS Sheffield was sighted but soon lost in the bad weather conditions. She was found again at 2035 hours, she guided the Swordfish in and directed them by visual signal on the enemy bearing 110°, 12 nautical miles. The force took departure for the target in subflights in line astern at 2040/26.

At 2047/26 no.1 subflight of three Swordfish dived through the clouds and sighted the Bismarck 4 nautical miles off to the south-east. One Swordfish of no.3 subflight was with them. Approaching again just inside the cloud they made their final dive at 2053/26 on the port beam under a very intense and accurate fire from the enemy. They dropped four torpedoes of which one was seen to hit. No.2 subflight, made up of two Swordfish, lost touch with no.1 subflight in the clouds, climed to 9000 feet, then dived on a bearing obtained by radar and then attacked from the starboard beam, again under heavy and intense fire. They dropped two torpedoes for one possible hit. The third plane of this subflight had lost touch with the other two and had returned to HMS Sheffield to obtained another range and bearing to the enemy. It then flew ahead of the enemy and carried out a determined attack from his port bow under heavy fire and obtained a torpedo hit on the port side amidships.

Subflight no.4 followed subflight no.3 into the clouds but got iced up at 6600 feet. It then dived through the clouds and was joined by no.2 aircraft from subflight no.3. The Bismarck was then sighted engaging subflight no.2 to starboard. The four aircraft then went into the clouds and cicled the German battleships stern and then dived out of the clouds again and attack simultaneously from the port side firing four torpedoes. All however missed the Bismarck. They came under a very heavy and fierce fire from the enemy and one of the aircraft was heavily damaged, the pilot and air gunner being wounded.

The two aircraft of subflight no.5 lost contact with the other subflights and then with each other in the cloud. They climbed to 7000 feet where ice began to form. When coming out of the cloud at 1000 feet aircraft 4K sighted the Bismarck down wind, she then went back into the cloud under fire from the enemy. She saw a torpedo hit on the enemy's starboard side, reached a position on the starboard bow, withdrew to 5 miles, then came in just above the sea and just outside 1000 yards fired a torpedo which did not hit. The second plane of this flight lost his leader diving through the cloud, found himself on the starboard quarter and after two attempts to attack under heavy fire was forced to jettison his torpedo.

Of the two Swordfish of subflight no.6 one attacked the Bismarck on the starboard beam and dropped his torpedo at 2000 yards without success. The second plane lost the enemy, returned to the Sheffield for a new range and bearing and after searching at sea level attacked on the starboard beam but was driven off by intense fire. The attack was over by 2125/26. Thirteen torpedoes had been fired and it was thought two hits and one probable hit had been obtained. Two torpedoes were jettisoned. The severe nature and full effect of the damage done was at first not fully realised. Actually the Bismarck had received a deadly blow. The last of the shadowing aircraft to return had seen her make two complete circles. One torpedo had struck her on the port side amidships doing little damage but th other torpedo that hit was on the starboard quarter damaging her propellors, wrecking her steering gear and jambing her rudders, it was this torpedo hit that sealed her fate.

HMS Sheffield was still shadowing astern when at 2140/26 the Bismarck turned to port and fired six accurate salvoes of 15". None actually hit Sheffield but a near miss killed three men and seriously injured two. HMS Sheffield turned away and while doing so she sighted HMS Cossack and the other destroyers from the 4th DF approaching from the westward. She then gave them the approximate position of the Bismarck. At 2155/26, HMS Sheffield lost touch with the Bismarck. The destroyers continued to shadow and eventually attack. Meanwhile HMS Renown and HMS Ark Royal shaped course for the southward to keep the road clear for the Commander-in-Chief in HMS King George V and for HMS Rodney. Also in the Ark Royal aircraft were being got ready for an attack on the Bismarck at dawn.

Bismarck, 26 May 1941.

The Bismarck could no longer steer after the torpedo hit aft. The steering motor room was flooded up to the main deck and the rudders were jambed. Divers went down to the steering room and managed to centre one rudder but the other remained immovable. She was by this time urgently in need of fuel. It was hoped by the Germans that while she was nearing the French coast strong forces of aircraft and submarines would come to her assistance.

At 2242/26, Bismarck sighted the British destroyers. A heavy fire was opened on them. Their appearence greatly complicated the situation. Before their arrival however, Admiral Lütjens seems to have made up his mind as one hour earlier he had signalled to Berlin 'ship out of control. We shall fight to the last shell. Long live the Führer.'

The fourth Destroyer Flotilla makes contact, 26 May 1941.

Just as the sun was setting, Captain Vian (D.4) in HMS Cossack with HMS Maori, HMS Sikh, HMS Zulu and the Polish destroyer ORP Piorun arrived on the scene.

Shortly after 1900/26 HMS Renown and HMS Ark Royal were sighted to the northward. Ark Royal was just about to fly off the second striking force. The destroyers continued on the the south-east. At 2152/26 HMS Sheffield was sighted and from her Captain Vian obtained the approximate position of the enemy.

The destroyers were spread 2.5 nautical miles apart on a line bearing 250° - 070° in the order from north-east to south-west, Piorun, Maori, Cossack, Sikh, Zulu. During the latter stages of the approach speed was reduced and the flotilla manoeuvred so as to avoid making a high speed end-on contact.

At 2238/26, ORP Piorun on the port wing reported the Bismarck 9 nautical miles distant, bearing 145° and steering to the south-eastward.

Destroyers shadowing, late on 26 May 1941.

At the time the Piorun reported being in contact with the Bismarck the destroyers were steering 120°. All were at once ordered to take up shadowing positions. Four minutes later the Bismarck opened a heavy fire with her main and secondary armaments on the Piorun and Maori. Two attempts were made by these ships to work round to the northward of the enemy but they were silhouetted against the north-western horizon making them easy to spot. The Bismarck's fire was unpleasantly accurate, through neither destroyer was actually hit. The Commanding Officer of the Maori then decided to work round to the southward and altered course accordingly.

The Piorun closed the range and herself opened fire from 13500 yards but after firing three salvoes, she was straddled by a salvo which fell about 20 yards from the ships side. She then ceased fire and turned away to port while making smoke. During this engagement she lost touch with the other destroyers and later also with the Bismarck. She remained under fire for about one hour but was not hit. She worked round to the north-east of the Bismarck but eventually lost touch with her prey at 2355/26.

The other destroyers, meanwhile, had been working round to the southward of the enemy to take up shadowing positions to the eastward of him. Soon after the initial contact it was evident the the Bismarck's speed had been so seriously reduced that interception by the battlefleet was certain, provided that contact could be held. In these circumstances Captain Vian defined his object at firstly, to deliver the enemy to the Commander-in-Chief at the time he desired, and secondly, to sink or immoblise her with torpedoes during the night but not with to great a risk for the destroyers. Accordingly at 2248/26 as signal was made to all ordering them to shadow and this operation was carried out through the night, though torpedo attacks were carried out later under the cover of darkness.

As darkness came on, the weather deteriorated and heavy rain squalls became frequent. Visibility varied between 2.5 nautical miles and half a mile but the Bismarck, presumably using radar, frequently opened up accurate fire outside these ranges.

About half an hour after sunset, the destroyers were ordered at 2324/26 to take up stations prepartory to carrying out a synchronised torpedo attack. This was subsequently cancelled on account of the adverse weather conditions and they were ordered to attack independently as opportunity offered. At about 2300 hours the Bismarck altered course to the north-westward.

At this time HMS Zulu was in touch with her and kept her under observation from the southward. At 2342 hours the Bismarck opened fire on HMS Cossack, then about 4 miles to the south-south-west and shot away her aerials. The Cossack turned away under the cover of smoke, shortly afterwards resuming her course to the eastward.

A few minutes later, at 2350 hours, HMS Zulu came under heavy fire from the Bismarck's 15" guns. The first three salvoes straddled wounding an officer and two ratings. Drastic avoiding action was taken as a result of which Zulu lost touch. HMS Sikh, however, who had lost sight of the enemy half an hour previously, had observed her firing at HMS Cossack and now succeeded in shadowing from astern until 0020/27 when the enemy made a large alteration to port and commenced firing at her. HMS Sikh altered course to port, intending to fire torpedoes, but the view of the Torpedo Control Officer was obscured by shell splashes and Sikh then withdrew to the southward.

Destroyer night torpedo attacks, 26/27 May 1941.

HMS Zulu, after her escape at 2345/26, had steered to the northward and at 0030/27 fell in with HMS Cossack. Shortly afterwards she sighted ORP Piorun. On receipt of a signal from Captain Vian, timed 0040/27, to take any opporunity to fire torpedoes, HMS Zulu altered course to the westward,and at 0100/27 sighted the Bismarck steering 340°.

Positions of the destroyers was now as follows; to the north-eastward of the enemy, HMS Cossack was working round to the north and west. HMS Maori, since losing touch, had been making to the westward. She was now to the south-west of the Bismarck. HMS Sikh was some distance to the southward, not having received any information regarding the position of the Bismarck since 0025/27. HMS Zulu was astern of the enemy and in contact. Range was only 5000 yards. Bismarck finally spotted Zulu and at once opened fire with her main and secondary armament and straddled Zulu. She fired four torpedoes at 0121/27 but no hits were observed and they are believed to have missed ahead. Zulu then ran out to the northward in order to be clear of the other destroyers. Shortly afterwards they widnessed a successful attack by HMS Maori.

HMS Maori had seen the Bismarck opening fire on the Zulu at 0107/27. Maori then closed to 4000 yards on Bismarck's port quarter apparently undetected. When abeam of the enemy, who then appeared to be altering course to starboard Maori fired a star shell to see what he was about. Two minutes later, at 0137/27, two torpedoes were fired and course was altered towards the Bismarck with the intention of attacking again from her starboard bow once the enemy had steadied on her new course. Whilst Maori was turning a torpedo hit was observed on the enemy. A bright glow illuminated the waterline of the enemy battleship from stem to stern. Shortly afterwards there appeared between the bridge and the stem a glare that might have been a second hit. The enemy immediately opened up a very heavy fire with both main and secondairy armaments and quick firing guns. As the Maori was being straddled, she turned away, and increased to full speed. Shots continued to fall on both sides of the ship until the range had been opened up to 10000 yards. Maori was not actually hit. Meanwhile HMS Cossack had been creeping up from the north-eastward and at 0140/27, only three minutes after Maori had fired two torpedoes, Cossack launched three torpedoes from 6000 yards. Bismarck stood out plainly, silhoutted by the broadsides she was firing at the Maori. One torpedo was seen to hit. Flames blazed on the forecastle of the Bismarck after this hit but they were quickly extinguished. Probably as a consequence of the torpedo hits the Bismarck stopped dead in the water, this was reported by HMS Zulu at 0148/27. After about one hour the Bismarck got underway again. On receipt of this report, HMS Sikh, who was closing the scene of the action from the southward, made an attack. Four torpedoes were fired at 0218/27 at the stopped battleship. It is believed that one hit was obtained. After this attack Sikh remained in radar contact with the enemy until 0359/27 when contact was lost.

Around 0240/27 the Bismarck was underway again, proceeding very slowly to the north-westward. At 0335/27, HMS Cossack made another attack firing her last remaining torpedo from a range of 4000 yards. It missed. HMS Cossack then came under a heavy fire. She withdrew to the northward under the cover of smoke, altering to a westerly course shortly afterwards.

At 0400/27 all destroyers had lost touch with the enemy. HMS Cossack was then to the north-west and HMS Sikh, HMS Zulu and HMS Maori were between the south-west and south-east of the Bismarck. All destroyers now endeavoured to regain contact.

Touch with the enemy was not regained until shortly before 0600 hours. By that time ORP Piorun, which was running short of fuel, had been ordered to proceed to Plymouth.

Destroyers shadowing, morning twilight, 27 May 1941, final attack.

Touch was regained by HMS Maori at 0550/27 when she sighted the Bismarck zigzagging slowly on a base course of 340° at about 7 knots. Maori commenced shadowing until daylight. At 0625 hours, HMS Sikh was also in contact when the Bismarck emerged from a rain squal 7000 yards on her starboard bow. By then it was nearly full daylight but to the surprise of the crew of the Sikh she got away with it without being fired at.

Shortly before sunrise a final torpedo attack was carried out by HMS Maori, which fired two torpedoes at 0656/27 from 9000 yards. Both missed. The Bismarck opened fire and straddled Maori which escaped at 28 knots.

At daylight the destroyers were stationed in four sectors from which they were able to keep the enemy under continuous observation until the arrival of the Battle Fleet at 0845 hours.

Force H, 26/27 May 1941.

While the destroyers were shadowing the Bismarck, the pursuing forces were drawing steadily closer. To the north was the Commander-in-Chief with the King George V and the Rodney with the Norfolk closing on them. In the south HMS Dorsetshire (Capt. B.C.S. Martin, RN) was coming up, while Force H was waiting for the dawn. When Captain Vian's destroyers got in touch at 2251/26 the Renown and Ark Royal were north-west of the enemy. It was not possible to attack with aircraft during the night but all preparations were made to attack at dawn with 12 Swordfish. Course was shaped to the northward and then to the west for a time and at 0115/27 Force H turned south. Shortly afterwards instructions were received from the Commander-in-Chief to keep not less then 20 miles to the southward of the Bismarck so as to leave a clear approach for the Battle Fleet. Force H accordingly continued to the southward during the night. Bursts of starshell and gunfire could be seen during the night while the destroyers attacked. At 0509/27 an aircraft was flown off from HMS Ark Royal to act as a spotter for HMS King George V but it failed to find the Bismarck in the bad weather. The striking of force of 12 Swordfish was ready but due to the bad weather to strike was cancelled.

At 0810/27, HMS Maori was sighted. She reported the Bismarck 11 miles to the north of her. The made the enemy 17 miles to the north of HMS Renown so course was shaped to the south-west. At 0915/27 heavy gunfire could be heard and the striking force was flown off. They found the Bismarck at 1016/27. By then the battle was almost over, her guns were silenced and she was on fire. They saw her sink. At 1115/27 they had all landed back on HMS Ark Royal. A German Heinkel aircraft dropped a couple of bombs near HMS Ark Royal when they were landing on.

HMS Norfolk, 26/27 May 1941.

When the Catalina report (1030/26) came in, HMS Norfolk altered course to the south-west and increased speed to 27 knots. At 2130/26 the Bismarck was still some 160 nautical miles to the southward and speed was increased to 30 knots. At 2228/26 the report on the torpedo hit by the aircraft from Ark Royal came in and the Norfolk turned to the southward, continuing to close the enemy. At 0753/27 Norfolk sighted the Bismarck. She did not open fire and was lost to sight after ten minutes. At 0821/27, HMS King George V, was sighted to the westward, 12 nautical miles away. The position of the enemy was passed to the Commander-in-Chief. The action opened at 0847/27 at which time HMS Norfolk was then some 10 nautical miles from the Commander-in-Chief and due north of the Bismarck. HMS Norfolk had seen the beginning and was now to see the end.

HMS Dorsetshire, 26/27 May 1941.

On 26 May 1941, HMS Dorsetshire, was with convoy SL 74 proceeding from Freetown to the U.K. When she received the sighting report from the Catalina at 1056/26 she was some 360 nautical miles to the south of the Bismarck. She then left the protection of the convoy to the Armed Merchant Cruiser HMS Bulolo (Capt.(Retd.) R.L. Hamer, RN) and set course for the northward to take up the possible task of shadowing. By 2343/26 it became clear from reports that the Bismarck was making no ground to the eastward and that at 0230/27 she appeared to be laying stopped. Due to the heavy seas HMS Dorsetshire was forced to reduce speed to 25 knots and later even to 20 knots. At 0833/27 a destroyer was sighted ahead at a range of 8 nautical miles, it was HMS Cossack which reported the enemy at a range of 6 nautical miles. At 0850/27 the flashes of the Bismarck's guns could be seen to the westward. HMS Dorsetshire arrived at the scene of the action in the nick of time.

HMS King George V and HMS Rodney, 26/27 May 1941.

During 26 May 1941 the Commander-in-Chief in HMS King George V had been making hard to the south-east at 25 knots. He had been joined by HMS Rodney at 1806/26. They were then some 90 nautical miles north of the Bismarck. Fuel was a matter of grave anxiety. At noon on the 26th, HMS King George V, had only 32% remaining and HMS Rodney reported that she had to return at 0800/27. Speed had to be reduced on this account to 22 knots at 1705/26. In these circumstances it was no longer possible to hope to intercept the enemy, and the Commander-in-Chief decided that unless the enemy's speed had been reduced by 2400/26, he must turn at that hour. The only hope lay in the Bismarck being slowed up by the Swordfish attacking from HMS Ark Royal. A report came in that the striking force had left. Then at 2132/26, HMS Sheffield, reported that the enemy was steering 340° followed by 000° four minutes later. These reports indicated that the Bismarck was not able to hold her course and that her steering gear must have been damaged. It might still be possible to intercept her.

The Commander-in-Chief turned to the south at once hoping to make contact from the eastward in the failing light. Due to the bad weather conditions and visibility the Commander-in-Chief decided to haul off the the eastward and northward and then work round to engage from the westward at dawn. He turned eastward at 2306/26. During the night reports from Captain Vian's destroyers came in confirming the northerly course of the Bismarck. At 0236/27 the Commander-in-Chief ordered Captain Vian that the destroyers were to fire star-shell every half hour, but frequent rain squalls prevented these from being seen and they tended to attrack the enemy's fire. The Bismarck was still a formidable opponent for at 0353/27 Captain Vian reported that during the last hour she had done 8 nautical miles and that she was still capable of heavy and accurate fire. The Commander-in-Chief decided not to make a dawn approach but to wait until daylight while approaching from the west taking advantage of wind, sea and light. At 0529/27 HMS Rodney reported sighting HMS Norfolk to the eastward by DF. It was light at 0600 hours. At 0820 hours HMS Norfolk was sighted on the port bow of HMS King George V. She signalled 'enemy 130°, 16 nautical miles'. At 0843/27 looming on the starboard bow there emerges out of a rain squall the dark grey blot of a large ship. 'Enemy in sight'.

Bismarck 26/27 May 1941.

The Bismarck after altering course to the north-west had been labouring along with a jambed rudder, steering an erratic course at 8 knots. During the night the attacking destroyers were met with heavy and accurate salvoes. Sixteen torpedoes were fired at her. Early in the morning a glare of star-shell burst over her, lighting her up. Three torpedoes followed from a destroyer on the port bow (HMS Maori) of which one hit on the port side amidships. Three minutes later three more came from the starboard side (these were fired by HMS Cossack) of which one hit on the starboard bow. The damage that was sustained from these torpedo hits is not known. The Bismarck lay stopped for over one hour. At 0140/27 a message was received that a large number of Junkers bombers were coming to her aid as were U-boats but the Bismarck was beyond their help besides that the aircraft did not find her. One U-boat (U-556, which was out of torpedoes) on its way back from the Atlantic joined her and was within sight during the night. Another (U-74) arrived at 0600/27 but had been damaged in a depth charge attack and could do nothing as well. In the Bismarck the crew was exhausted and men were falling asleep at their posts. It was under these conditions that at 0840/27 two British battleships were seen to approach from the westward.

Situation before the action, 27 May 1941.

A north-westerly gale was blowing when dawn broke with a good light and clear horizon to the north-eastward. Reports received during the night indicated that, despite reduced speed and damaged rudders, Bismarck's armament was functioning effectively. Given the weather conditions the Commander-in-Chief decided to approach on a west-north-westerly bearing and, if the enemy continued his northerly course, to deploy to the southward on opposite course at a range of about 15000 yards. Further action was to be dictated by events.

Between 0600 and 0700 hours a series of enemy reports from HMS Maori which was herself located by DF bearings. This enabled HMS King George V to plot her position relatively to the Bismarck which had apparently settled down on a course of 330° at 10 knots. At 0708/27, HMS Rodney, was ordered to keep station 010° from the flagship. HMS Norfolk came in sight to the eastward at 0820/27 and provided a visual link between the Commander-in-Chief and the enemy. After the line of approach had been adjusted by two alterations of course, the Bismarck was sighted at 0843/27 bearing 118°, range about 25000 yards. Both British battleships was then steering 110° almost directly towards the enemy in line abreast formation, 8 cables apart.

Commencement of action 0847/27.

HMS Rodney opened fire at 0847/27, her first salvo sending a column of water 150 feet into the air. HMS King George V opened fire one minute later. Bismarck opened fire at 0850 hours after turning to open up A arcs. The first German salvo was short. The third and fourth salvoes straddled and nearly hit, but the Rodney manoeuvered succesfully to avoid them and the nearest fell 20 yards short. At 0854/27, HMS Norfolk joined in, but the target was not clearly visible and she opened fire without obtaining a range.

Observers state that the German gunnery was accurate at first, but commenced to deteriorate after 8 to 10 salvoes. The first hit on the Bismarck was believed to be scored by the Rodney at 0854 hours with her third salvo. Both British battleships made small alterations of course away from the enemy shortly after opening fire, the King George V to increase her distance from the Rodney and the latter to open her A arcs. From then onwards they manoeuvered independently although HMS Rodney conformed to the Flagship's general movements. The Bismarck's secondary armament came into action during this phase. HMS Rodney opened fire with her secondary armament at 0858 hours.

Run to the southward.

HMS King George V deployed to the southward at 0859/27 when the Bismarck was 16000 yards distant. HMS Rodney, 2.5 nautical miles to the northward, followed suit a minute or two later. Cordite smoke was hanging badly with the following wind and spotting was most difficult. Considerable smoke interference was therefore experienced on the southerly course which was partly overcome by radar. The Bismarck had transferred her fire to the King George V shortly after the turn but except for an occasional splash the latter hardly knew that she was under fire. At 0902/27, HMS Rodney saw a 16” shell hit the Bismarck on the upper deck forward, apparently putting the forward turrets out of action. At 0904 hours, HMS Dorsetshire joined in the firing from the eastwards from a range of 20000 yards but observation of the target was difficult and she had to check fire from 0913 to 0920 hours. Between 0910 and 0915 hours the range in King George V was more or less steady at 12000 yards.

The fate of the Bismarck was decided during this phase of the action although she did not sink until later. Around 0912 hours, the Bismarck was hit on her forward control position. During the run to the south HMS Rodney fired six torpedoes from 11000 yards and HMS Norfolk four from 16000 yards. No hits were obtained. The King George V’s secondary battery came into action at 0905 hours but this increased the smoke interference and was accordingly ordered to cease fire after two or three minutes.

strong>Run to the northward.

At 0916/27 the Bismarck’s bearing was drawing rapidly aft and HMS Rodney turned 16 points to close and head her off. The King George V followed a minute or so later and both ships re-opened fire at ranges from 8600 and 12000 yards respectively. The Bismarck shifted her target to the Rodney about this time. A near miss damaged the sluice of her starboard torpedo tube. Most of the enemy’s guns had however been silenced at this time. Only one turret from her main armament was firing at this time as was part of her secondary armament. A fire was blazing amidships and she had a heavy list to port. During the run to the north HMS Rodney obtained a very favourable position on the Bismarck’s bow from which she poured in a heavy fire from close range. She also fired two torpedoes from 7500 yards but no hits were obtained.

HMS King George V’s position, further to leeward, was less favourable. Her view was obscured by smoke and splashes surrounding the target and her radar had temporarily broken down. Mechanical failures in the 14” turrets constituted, however, a more serious handicap at this stage. ‘A’, ‘X’ and ‘Y’ turrets were out of action for 30, 7 and a unspecified short period, respectively. This resulted in reduction of firepower of 80% for 7 minutes and 40% for 23 minutes which might have had serious effects under less favourable conditions. There were also several defects of individual guns in addition to those effecting the turrets.

At 0925/27, HMS King George V, altered outwards to 150° and reduced speed to avoid getting too far ahead of the Bismarck. She closed in again at 1005 hours, fired several salvoes from a range of only 3000 yards and then resumed her northerly course. Meanwhile HMS Rodney was zigzagging across the Bismarck’s line of advance at a range of about 4000 yards firing her main and secondary armaments. She also fired four torpedoes, one of which is thought to have hit. By 1015 hours the Bismarck was no more than a wreck. All her guns were silenced, her mast had been blown away, she was a black ruin, pouring high into the air a great cloud of smoke and flame. Men were seen jumping overboard at this time and the Captain of the King George V later remarked had he known it he would have ceased fire.

End of the action.

The Commander-in-Chief was confident that the enemy could never get back to harbour, and as both battleships were running short of fuel and as further gunfire was unlikely to hasten the Bismarck’s end, the Commander-in-Chief signalled the King George V and Rodney to steer 027° at 1015/27 in order to break off the action and return to base. At 1036/27 the Commander-in-Chief ordered HMS Dorsetshire to use her torpedoes, if she had any, on the enemy. In the meantime HMS Norfolk had been closing the target but due to the movements of the King George V and Rodney, had not fired her torpedoes until 1010 hours when she fired four torpedoes from 4000 yards and two possible hits were reported. The Dorsetshire was then approaching a mile or so to the southward, and anticipating the Commander-in-Chief’s signal at 1025 hours fired two torpedoes from 3600 yards into the enemy’s starboard side. She then steamed round the Bismarck’s bow and at 1036 hours fired another torpedo but now into her port side from 2600 yards. This was the final blow, the Bismarck heeled over quickly to port and commenced to sink by the stern. The hull turned over keel up and disappeared beneath the waves at 1040/27.

The Dorsetshire then closed and signalled to one of HMS Ark Royal’s aircraft to carry out a close A/S patrol while she was to pick up survivors assisted by HMS Maori. After 110 men had been picked up by both ships from the water both ships got underway again as a submarine was suspected to be in the area.

Damage to the Bismarck.

Survivors have told the story of terrible damage inflicted on her. The fore turrets seem to have been knocked out at 0902 hours. The fore control position was knocked out around 0912 hours. The after control position followed about 0915 hours. The after turrets were at that moment still in action. Then the aftermost gun turret was disabled by a direct hit on the left gun which burst sending a flash right through the turret. ‘C’ turret was the last one in action.

One survivor stated that around 0930 hours a shell penetrated the turbine room and another one entered a boiler room. A hit in the after dressing station killed all the medical staff and wounded that were in there at that moment. The upper deck was crowded with killed and wounded men and the seas surging in washed them overboard. Conditions below were even more terrible. Hatches and doors were jammed by concussion and blocked with wreckage. The air was thick with smoke and even more smoke was coming in from great holes in the upper deck. By 1000 hours all heavy guns were out of action and 10 minutes later the all secondary guns were also silent.

Commander-in-Chief returns.

As HMS King George V and HMS Rodney turned northwards they were joined by HMS Cossack, HMS Sikh and HMS Zulu at by 1600/28 more detroyers had joined the screen (HMS Maori, HMS Jupiter, HMS Somali, HMS Eskimo, HMS Punjabi, HMAS Nestor, HMS Inglefield, HMS Lance, HMS Vanquisher (Cdr. N.V. Dickinson, DSC, RN), HMCS St. Clair (Lt.Cdr. D.C. Wallace, RCNR), HMCS Columbia (Lt.Cdr. (Retd.) S.W. Davis, RN) and HMS Ripley (Lt.Cdr. J.A. Agnew, RN)). Heavy air attacks were expected that day, but only four enemy aircraft appeared, one of which bombed the screen while another one jettisoned her bombs on being attacked by a Blenheim fighter. The destroyers HMS Mashona and HMS Tartar, 100 nautical miles to the southward, were not so furtunate. They were attacked in position 52°58’N, 11°36’W at 0955/28 by German aircraft. HMS Mashona was hit and sank at noon with the loss of 1 officer and 45 men. The Commander-in-Chief reached Loch Ewe at 1230/29. Vice-Admiral Sommerville with Force H was on his way back to Gibraltar.

End of ‘Operation Rheinübung’.

The Bismarck’s consort, heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen, was not heard off until 4 June 1941 when aircraft reported her having arrived at Brest. After leaving the Bismarck at 1914/24, the Prinz Eugen’s primary need was to replenish her fuel stock. She set course for a rendez-vous with two tankers, the Spichern (9323 GRT, built 1935, former Norwegian Krossfonn) and the Esso Hamburg (9849 GRT, built 1939) which were position to the north-west of the Azores. All next day the German cruiser made her way southwards, and at 0906/26 , some 600 nautical miles west-north-west of the Azores she sighted the Spichern and refuelled. Two reconnaissance ships had also been ordered into this area, the Gonzenheim and the Kota Pinang. On the 28th Prinz Eugen fuelled from the Esso Hamburg. She then proceeded southwards to carry out cruiser warfare against independently routed ships in the area to the north and west of the Cape Verde Islands but an inspection of her engines the next day showed that an extensive overhaul was needed. Her Commanding Officer then decided to break off the action and course was set for Brest, France where she arrived at 2030/1 June.

A German reconnaissance ship, a supply vessel and two tankers were intercepted by Royal Navy warships and sunk by their own crew or sunk with gunfire. Also two tankers were captured. These were in chronological order; tanker Belchen (6367 GRT, built 1932, former Norwegian Sysla) by gunfire from HMS Kenya and HMS Aurora on 3 June 1941 in the Greenland area in approximate position 59°00'N, 47°00'W.
On 4 June the tanker Esso Hamburg by HMS London and HMS Brilliant (Lt.Cdr. F.C. Brodrick, RN) in position 07°35'N, 31°25'W,
tanker Gedania (8966 GRT, built 1920) was captured in the North Atlantic in position 43°38'N, 28°15'W by naval auxiliary (Ocean Boarding Vessel) HMS Marsdale (Lt.Cdr. D.H.F. Armstrong, RNR), she was put into service with the MOWT as Empire Garden, reconnaissance vessel Gonzenheim (4000 GRT, built 1937, former Norwegian Kongsfjord) was scuttled by her own crew after being sighted by HMS Esperance Bay ((Capt.(ret) G.S. Holden, RN) and intercepted by HMS Nelson (Capt. Sir. G.J.A. Miles, RN) and finally ordered to be boarded by HMS Neptune in position 43°29'N, 24°04'W. The next day (5 June) supply vessel Egerland (10040 GRT, built 1940) was intercepted by HMS London and HMS Brilliant in approximate position 07°00'N, 31°00'W. On 12 June, HMS Sheffield, intercepted tanker Friedrich Breme (10397 GRT, built 1936) in position 49°48'N, 22°20'W and finally on 15 June, HMS Dunedin (Capt. R.S. Lovatt, RN), captured the tanker strong>Lothringen (10746 GRT, built 1940, former Dutch Papendrecht) in position 19°49'N, 38°30'W which had first been sighted by an aircraft from HMS Eagle (Capt. E.G.N. Rushbrooke, DSC, RN). The Lothringen was sent to Bermuda and was put into service by the MOWT as Empire Salvage. (12)

27 May 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) departed Portsmouth for her 17th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Bay of Biscay.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

30 May 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) fires six torpedoes against German U-boat U-74 in the Bay of Biscay about 45 nautical miles south-west of Belle-Ile Island, France in position 46°58'N, 04°12'W. All six torpedoes missed their target.

(all times are zone -2)
1703 hours - In position 46°58'N, 04°12'W sighted a U-boat to the south-west on a northerly course. Started attack but during the initial setup the periscope dipped at a crucial moment and a new attack setup had to be made.

1714 hours - Fired six torpedoes from 1500 yards. Went deep on firing.

1718 hours - Returned to periscope depth and saw that the U-boat had altered course down the tracks and was right ahead steering directly away. The tracks had been seen and in the evenig two A/S trawlers and aircraft were seen patrollig the area of the attack. (3)

13 Jun 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) ended her 17th war patrol at Portsmouth. (3)

27 Jun 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) departed Portsmouth for her 18th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Bay of Biscay.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

7 Jul 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) sank the French fishing vessel Christus Regnat (28 GRT) with gunfire in the Bay of Biscay in position 45°50'N, 03°30'W.

(All times are zone -2)
0030 hours - Sighted a French tuna fishing vessel. Closed.

0043 hours - Ordered the crew to abandon ship.

0047 hours - Opened fire with the 3" gun.

0051 hours - The vessel sank.

0100 hours - Picked up the French crew of 5. (3)

8 Jul 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) sank the French fishing vessel Gustave (118 GRT) with gunfire in approximate position 46°03'N, 02°25'W. The crew of the fishing vessel sunk the day before was then transferred to another fishing vessel that was then allowed to proceed.

(All times are zone -2)
0350 hours - Sighted a fishing vessel, closed.

0422 hours - Gun action stations. Ordered the crew of the fishing vessel to abandon ship.

0428 hours - Opened fire with the 3" gun.

0438 hours - The fishing vessel was sinking. Ceased fire.

0454 hours - Went alongside another fishing vessel and transferred the crew of the fishing vessel that we had sunk the day before. (3)

9 Jul 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) sank the French fishing trawler St Pierre d'Alcantara (329 GRT) with gunfire south of Penmarch in position 47°00'N, 04°30'W.

(All times are zone -2)
1415 hours - Surfaced for a sight. Sighted a steam trawler. Submerged again and commenced closing it.

1531 hours - Surfaced in position 47°00'N, 04°30'W and fired a shot of 3" across the trawlers bow but it produced little reaction.

Then fired a shot between the mast and the bridge. This caused the vessel to stop and blow off steam. The crew however did not move to their boat so fired a shot into her waterline well forward. The crew then slipped their trawl but as the trawler kept pointing towards Sealion four more rounds were put into her bow. The crew then finally started to abandon ship. When they were clear seven rounds were put into her engine room at the waterline. Seventeen survivors were then picked up and taken below.

1606 hours - Dived.

1609 hours - The trawler was seen to sink.

During the next night all survivors were transferred to another fishing vessel. (3)

13 Jul 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) ended her 18th war patrol at Portsmouth. (3)

2 Aug 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) departed Portsmouth for her 19th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Bay of Biscay. Before proceeding on patrol exercises were carried out off Dartmouth during 3-5 August 1941.

For the daily positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

21 Aug 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) ended her 19th war patrol at Portsmouth. (3)

22 Aug 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) was docked at Portsmouth. (13)

8 Sep 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) was undocked. (14)

12 Sep 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) departed Portsmouth for her 20th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Bay of Biscay.

For the daily positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

25 Sep 1941
HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) ended her 20th war patrol at Portsmouth (3)

22 Oct 1941
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) departed Portsmouth for Scapa Flow.

For the daily positions of HMS Sealion during the passage from Portsmouth to Polyarnoe, northern Russia, see the map below.

(15)

24 Oct 1941
At 0720 hours, HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN), made rendez-vous with HMS White Bear (Cdr. (retired) C.C. Flemming, RN) to the south-west of the Lizard. They then proceeded north up the Irish Sea. (15)

27 Oct 1941
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) arrived at Scapa Flow. (15)

28 Oct 1941
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) departed Scapa Flow for Polyarnoe, Russia. (15)

6 Nov 1941
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) arrived at Polyarnoe. (16)

12 Nov 1941
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) departed Polyarnoe for her 21th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol off northern Norway.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

15 Nov 1941
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) attacked the Norwegian merchant Bessheim (1774 GRT, built 1912) in approximate position 71°06'N, 26°54'E with one torpedo which missed the target.

(All times are zone -3)
1010 hours - Sighted an A/S trawler proceeding to the westward.

1025 hours - When in position 047°, Svaerholt Klubben, 8 nautical miles sighted a merchant vessel of about 1200 to 1500 tons crossing the entrance of the Lakse Fjord and observed that the trawler that was sighted 15 minutes earlier formed one of the escorts of three or four of these vessels. Range was 7000 - 8000 yards. Started attack.

1045 hours - Fired one torpedo from 5500 to 6000 yards. It missed. Enemy course was 265°, speed 7 knots. No counter attack followed. (3)

18 Nov 1941
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) sank the Norwegian tanker Vesco (331 GRT, built 1926, offsite link) off the Laksefjord, Norway in position 71°00'N, 27°01'E.

(All times are zone -3)
1051 hours - When in position 053°, Svaerholt Klubben, 5 nautical miles sighted a merchant vessel of about 1000 tons. Started attack.

1127 hours - Sighted another merchant vessel that appeared to be bigger so shifted target. This new target was however soon seen to be much smaller then first thought but as it was seen to be a small diesel tanker which was deeply laden it was decided to go ahead with the attack due to her valuable cargo.

1142 hours - Fired three torpedoes from 600 - 800 yards. All torpedoes missed.

1147 hours - Surfaced in position 71°00'N, 27°01'E for gun action. Range was 1500 yards. The first round was already a hit. Fifteen rounds were fired for several hits in the engine room. The crew then abandoned ship so fire was ceased while their boat got clear. The boat was ordered alongside and the Master and the Second Engineer, who was wounded, were taken on board. Gunfire was re-opened. Twenty-two rounds were fired from close range and the ship was soon on fire.

1208 hours - Dived and cleared the area. (3)

20 Nov 1941
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) ended her 21th war patrol at Polyarnoe. (3)

1 Dec 1941
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) departed Polyarnoe for her 22th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol off northern Norway.

For the daily and attack positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

5 Dec 1941
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) torpedoed and sank the Norwegian merchant Island (638 GRT, built 1918, offsite link) north of Mehavn, Norway in position 71°07'N, 27°54'E.

(All times are zone -3)
1145 hours - Sighted an unescorted merchant vessel of about 1200 tons bearing 267°, range 6000 yards. Estimated enemy course 110°, speed 11 knots. Started attack.

1201 hours - In position 71°07'N, 27°54'E fired three torpedoes from 900 yards. One hit was obtained.

1250 hours - The ship was seen to sink by the bows. (3)

12 Dec 1941
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) ended her 22th war patrol at Polyarnoe. (3)

21 Dec 1941
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) departed Polyarnoe for her 23th war patrol. She was ordered to act as a beacon submarine during Operation Anklet (offsite link).

For the daily positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below. (No positions are known from 1 January 1942 onwards as there is no log available for this period and the patrol report does not give daily positions.)

(3)

27 Dec 1941
During 27-29 December 1941, HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN), remained in the area where she was to be in to particiate in Operation Anklet. (3)

3 Jan 1942
At 0915 hours, HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN), made rendez-vous with HMS White Bear (Cdr. (retired) C.C. Flemming, RN). They then proceeded towards Holy Loch. (3)

5 Jan 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) ended her 23th war patrol at Holy Loch. (3)

8 Jan 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) departed Holy Loch for Portsmouth. During the passage south through the Irish Sea she was escorted by HMS La Capricieuse (Lt.Cdr. G.W. Dobson, RNR). (17)

3 Feb 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) departed Portsmouth for her 24th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol off Brest.

No log is available for this period so no map can be displayed. (3)

14 Feb 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) ended her 24th war patrol at Portsmouth. (3)

23 Feb 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) departed Portsmouth for Holy Loch. (17)

27 Feb 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) arrived at Holy Loch. (17)

4 Mar 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) departed Holy Loch for Lerwick. She was escorted by HMS Antelope (Lt.Cdr. E.N. Sinclair, RN). (17)

6 Mar 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) arrived at Lerwick. (17)

7 Mar 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) departed Lerwick for her 25th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol off central Norway.

No log is available for this period so no map can be displayed. (3)

19 Mar 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) ended her 25th war patrol at Lerwick. She returned from patrol with serious defects to her port main motor. (3)

25 Mar 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) departed Lerwick for Holy Loch. (17)

27 Mar 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) arrived at Holy Loch. (17)

7 Apr 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) departed Holy Loch for Blyth where she was to refit. She made the passage together with HMS Tuna (Lt. M.B. St. John, RN). They were escorted by HNoMS Draug. (17)

9 Apr 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) arrived at Blyth. (17)

12 Apr 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) was taken in hand for refit at Blyth. (18)

4 Sep 1942
With her refit completed, HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN), ran engine trials off Blyth. (19)

7 Sep 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) ran engine trials off Blyth. (19)

8 Sep 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) conducted trials off Blyth. (19)

9 Sep 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) conducted trials off Blyth. (19)

11 Sep 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) conducted trials off Blyth. (19)

13 Sep 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) conducted exercises off Blyth. (19)

14 Sep 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) departed Blyth for Holy Loch. She made the passage together with HMS Tuna (Lt. R.P. Raikes, RN). They were escorted by HMS ML 300 (T/Lt. F.C.R. Piesse, RNVR) until 0725/15 when HMS Loch Monteith (T/Lt. K.W. Richardson, RNR) took over the escort. (19)

16 Sep 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) arrived at Scapa Flow. (19)

17 Sep 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) and HMS Tuna (Lt. R.P. Raikes, RN) departed Scapa Flow for Holy Loch. They were escorted by HMS White Bear (Cdr. (retired) C.C. Flemming, RN). (19)

19 Sep 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) arrived at Holy Loch to begin a training period. (19)

8 Oct 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) departed Holy Loch for her 26th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Bay of Biscay. Passage south through the Irish Sea was made together with HMS Ursula (Lt. R.B. Lakin, DSC, RN), HMS Unique (Lt. R.E. Boddington, RN) and HMS Graph (Lt. P.B. Marriot, RN). They were escorted by HMS La Capricieuse (Lt.Cdr. G.W. Dobson, RNR).

No log is available for this period so no map can be displayed. (3)

26 Oct 1942
At 0007 hours, while in position 47°16'N, 05°07'W, HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) was attacked in error by a British Hudson aircraft. Sealion immediately dived and when she was at 20 to 25 feet two explosions were heard in quick succession causing some damage and the loss of depth control. (3)

27 Oct 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) ended her 26th war patrol at Falmouth. After fuelling she proceeded back to sea to rendez-vous with HMS HMS Graph (Lt. P.B. Marriot, RN) and their escort towards Holy Loch, HMS Cutty Sark (Cdr.(retired) R.H. Mack, RN). (3)

29 Oct 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) arrived at Holy Loch. (17)

15 Nov 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) departed Holy Loch for her 27th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Bay of Biscay. Passage south through the Irish Sea was made together with HrMs Dolfijn (Lt.Cdr. H.M.L.F.E. van Oostrom Soede, RNN). They were escorted by HMS Scimitar (Lt.Cdr. C.G. Cuthbertson, DSC, RNR).

For the daily positions of HMS Sealion during this patrol see the map below.

(3)

29 Nov 1942
The Italian blockade breaker Cortellazzo had departed Bordeaux bound for Japan on 29 November 1942. The next day the ship was spotted by a Sunderland flying boat. The British submarines HMS Graph (Lt. P.B. Marriot, RN), HMS Clyde (Lt. R.S. Brookes, DSC, RN), and HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN), were ordered to intercept but failed to do so. (3)

3 Dec 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) ended her 27th war patrol at Falmouth. (3)

6 Dec 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) departed Falmouth for Holy Loch. Passage north through the Irish Sea was made together with HrMs Dolfijn (Lt.Cdr. H.M.L.F.E. van Oostrom Soede, RNN). They were escorted by HMS White Bear (Cdr. (retired) C.C. Flemming, RN). (20)

8 Dec 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) arrived at Holy Loch. (20)

17 Dec 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) was docked at Kames Bay. (20)

18 Dec 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) was undocked at Kames Bay. She then returned to Holy Loch. (20)

21 Dec 1942
The British submarines HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN), HMS Graph (Lt. P.B. Marriot, RN), HMS P 216 (Lt. D.S.R. Martin, RN), HMS P 312 (Lt.Cdr. R.M. Favell, RN) and the Dutch submarine HrMs O 14 (Lt.Cdr. H.A.W. Goossens, RNN) departed Holy Loch for Lerwick. They were escorted by the British ASW trawler HMS Lord Austin (T/Lt. E.L. Wathen, RNR). (21)

23 Dec 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) returned to Holy Loch with damage to her starboard main ballast tanks. (20)

29 Dec 1942
HMS Sealion (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) was now assigned to the 7th Submarine Flotilla for training duties. (17)

15 Jan 1943
HMS Sealion (Lt. D.S.M. Verschoyle-Campbell, DSC, RN) shifted from Rothesay to Ardrossan for repairs. (22)

26 Jan 1943
With her repairs completed HMS Sealion (Lt. D.S.M. Verschoyle-Campbell, DSC, RN) shifted from Ardrossan to Rothesay. (22)

20 Mar 1943
HMS Sealion (Lt. N.J. Coe, DSC, RNR) was docked at Kames Bay. (23)

23 Mar 1943
HMS Sealion (Lt. N.J. Coe, DSC, RNR) was undocked at Kames Bay. She then proceeded to Rothesay. (23)

1 Aug 1943
During exercises in the Clyde area, HMS H 28 (Lt. E.C. Croswell, DSC, RN), served as target for HMS Sealion (Lt. N.J. Coe, DSC, RNR). (24)

19 Aug 1943
HMS Sealion (Lt. N.J. Coe, DSC, RNR) was docked at Kames Bay. (25)

23 Aug 1943
HMS Sealion (Lt. N.J. Coe, DSC, RNR) was undocked at Kames Bay. She then proceeded to Rothesay. (25)

7 Oct 1943
While conducting A/S exercises in Inchmarnock water, HMS Sealion (Lt. N.J. Coe, DSC, RNR), is hit by HMS Skate (Lt. J.C. Rushbrooke, DSC, RN). The periscopes of HMS Sealion were damaged. (26)

10 Oct 1943
HMS Sealion (Lt. N.J. Coe, DSC, RNR) departed Rothesay for Barrow where repairs were to be effected. (26)

11 Oct 1943
HMS Sealion (Lt. N.J. Coe, DSC, RNR) arrived at Barrow. (26)

16 Nov 1943
With the repairs to her periscope standards, the installation of new periscopes and some work on her battery completed, HMS Sealion (Lt. N.J. Coe, DSC, RNR), departed Barrow for Rothesay. She was escorted by HMS Northern Wave (T/Lt. J.P. Kilbee, RNR). (27)

17 Nov 1943
HMS Sealion (Lt. N.J. Coe, DSC, RNR) arrived at Rothesay. (27)

Sources

  1. ADM 173/16055
  2. ADM 173/16056
  3. ADM 199/1835
  4. ADM 173/16057
  5. ADM 173/16516
  6. ADM 173/16518
  7. ADM 173/16520
  8. ADM 173/16521
  9. ADM 173/16522
  10. ADM 173/16954
  11. ADM 173/16956
  12. ADM 234/322
  13. ADM 173/16961
  14. ADM 173/16962
  15. ADM 173/16963
  16. ADM 173/16964
  17. ADM 199/424
  18. ADM 199/2570
  19. ADM 173/17558
  20. ADM 173/17560
  21. ADM 173/17196
  22. ADM 173/18011
  23. ADM 173/18013
  24. ADM 173/17761
  25. ADM 173/18018
  26. ADM 173/18020
  27. ADM 173/18021

ADM numbers indicate documents at the British National Archives at Kew, London.


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