Italian submarines in World War Two


Luigi Settembrini (ST)
Settembrini

TypeOcean going 
ClassSettembrini (7) 
Laid down 16 Apr 1928 Cantieri Navale Tosi di Taranto, Taranto
Launched28 Sep 1930
Commissioned25 Jan 1932
End service
Stricken
Loss date15 Nov 1944
Loss position36° 11'N, 19° 45'W
History
Fate Rammed in error by the US destroyer escort USS Frament in the North Atlantic in position 36°11'N, 19°45'W. T.V. Parodi and seven men were saved, forty-two Italians and three Americans were lost. The destroyer escort USS Scott was sent to search for survivors and assist the damaged USS Frament.

Commands

CommanderDate fromDate toCommand
C.C. Alcide Bardi12 Mar 19408 Oct 1941
C.C. Mario Resio8 Oct 194131 Jan 1942
C.C. Mario Paolo Pollina31 Jan 194228 Mar 1942
C.C. Giovanni Cunsolo28 Mar 194222 Apr 1942
C.C. Giovanni Cunsolo23 Apr 194222 May 1942
C.F. Candido Corvetti23 May 194230 Jun 1942
C.F. Riccardo Boris1 Jul 194215 Aug 1942
C.C. Mario Tei16 Aug 194227 Aug 1942
T.V. Giacomo Scano27 Aug 194217 Sep 1942
C.C. Alberto Torri18 Sep 194211 Oct 1942
C.C. Guido D'Alterio11 Oct 19423 Dec 1942
C.C. Athos Fraternale3 Dec 194227 Jan 1943
C.C. Domenico Romano28 Jan 194331 May 1943
C.C. Teucle Meneghini1 Jun 194316 Jun 1943
C.C. Renato Frascolla16 Jun 194318 Oct 1943
C.C. Antonio Bruzzone19 Oct 194322 Mar 1944
T.V. Giuseppe Ridella23 Mar 19447 May 1944
T.V. Eugenio Parodi8 May 194415 Nov 1944

Patrols and events

 CommanderDateTimePortArr. dateArr. timeArr. portMilesDescription
Bardi, Alcide8 Jun 19401137Augusta9 Jun 19401340Taranto303Passage Augusta-Taranto for docking to repair torpedo tube no.4. Available at 48 hours notice.

Bardi, Alcide18 Jun 19401315Taranto18 Jun 19401745TarantoExercises, escorted by the minesweeper R.D. 13.

1Bardi, Alcide20 Jun 19402158Taranto21 Jun 19401052Taranto90Sailed with the submarine Uebi Scebeli and patrolled in Zone B. Defensive patrol in the middle of Gulf of Taranto. Uneventful.

Bardi, Alcide4 Jul 19401630Taranto5 Jul 19401645Augusta283Passage Taranto-Augusta. Sailed with the submarine Settimo.
  5 Jul 19400515
(0) 189° - Cape Colonne 10.3 miles.
A dark ship was observed moving northward with three small vessels. A single torpedo (533mm) was fired from No.1 bow tube angled at 030°, at a distance of 3,000 metres. Luckily, it missed. This was the Italian armed merchant cruiser Caralis (3,510 GRT, built 1928) and C.C. Bardi had not been informed of her passage. At this time, the submarine had lost contact with Ruggiero Settimo but they joined again at 0615 hours.

2Bardi, Alcide8 Jul 19402320Augusta12 Jul 19401300Augusta442,4Patrolled in 36°20'N, 17°20'E, on a patrol line on the parallel with Settimo, Sciesa, Pisani and Brin.

Bardi, Alcide27 Jul 1940Augusta27 Jul 1940Augusta11Exercises.

3Bardi, Alcide4 Aug 19401758Augusta19 Aug 19400822Augusta1281,5Patrolled in western Aegean, between 35°20'N and 36°20'N, and between 21°30'E and 22°30'E.
  7 Aug 1940051535° 40'N, 22° 20'ETwo large destroyers had first been sighted at 0457 hours. At one point they appeared to be moving away, but they changed course and came back within range. On the spur of the moment, C.C. Bardi decided to fire a single torpedo from a distance of 3,000 metres, aimed at the second unit. It missed. The two vessels were possibly HMS Jervis and HMS Hostile, carrying an A/S sweep in the area of Elephonisi Island.

Bardi, Alcide21 Aug 19400530Augusta21 Aug 19401142Messina76Passage Augusta-Messina.

Bardi, Alcide11 Sep 19400625Messina1 Sep 19401100Messina42Exercises.

Bardi, Alcide23 Sep 19400615Messina23 Sep 19401510Messina80Exercises.

Bardi, Alcide10 Oct 19401100Messina10 Oct 19401740Messina49Exercises.

Bardi, Alcide12 Oct 19400835Messina12 Oct 19401525Messina71Exercises.

4Bardi, Alcide23 Oct 19401745Messina6 Nov 19401500Messina1750Sailed with the submarine Dessié. Patrolled off Cyrenaic coast between 32°55'N and 33°55'N, and between 23°55'E and 25°10'E, on a patrol line with Dessié.
  25 Oct 19400950-1055
(0) Off Cyrenaica.
The French hospital ship Sphinx was sighted.
  26 Oct 19401818
(0) Off Cyrenaica.
An unknown submarine was observed at 5,000 metres and she quickly submerged. This was actually Dessié who mistook Settembrini for an Italian torpedo-boat and dived preventively.

Bardi, Alcide26 Nov 19400835Messina26 Nov 19401545Messina78Exercises.

5Bardi, Alcide21 Dec 19400100Messina1 Jan 19411330Messina1603,5Patrolled off Cyrenaic coast from 32°50'N, 22°50'E, on course 190° for 190 miles then on course 360° for 30 miles and from 36°00'N, 20°40'E to 36°00'N, 17°20'E.
  24 Dec 19400527
0532 (e)
33° 03'N, 22° 39'E
(e) 33° 20'N, 22° 43'E
At 0519 hours, a submarine was sighted bearing 020° on the port side at a distance of 4,000 metres, proceeding westward. Luigi Settembrini took an interception course and at 0527 hours, having closed to 1,200 metres, fired a single bow torpedo but it missed. Bardi gave the order to prepare for gun action, but then cancelled as the submarine appeared to be similar to Tembien. He took his submarine deep to disengage. This was HMS Otus (Lt. Cdr. E.C.F. Nicolay, RN) who reported being attacked by a MAMELI class submarine.

Bardi, Alcide6 Jan 19411500Messina7 Jan 19411037Naples223Passage Messina-Naples. Then refit.

Bardi, Alcide5 Mar 19410937Naples5 Mar 19411820Naples75,5Exercises.

Bardi, Alcide8 Mar 19410915Naples8 Mar 19411610Naples44Exercises.

Bardi, Alcide13 Mar 19411214Naples13 Mar 19411735Naples36,5Exercises.

Bardi, Alcide15 Mar 19410742Naples15 Mar 19411716Naples53Exercises.

Bardi, Alcide19 Mar 19410857Naples19 Mar 19411542Naples38,5Exercises.

Bardi, Alcide20 Mar 19410758Naples20 Mar 19411210Naples32Exercises.

Bardi, Alcide23 Mar 19410704Naples23 Mar 19411658Naples51,5Exercises.

Bardi, Alcide26 Mar 19411410Naples27 Mar 19410919Messina223Passage Naples-Messina.

Bardi, Alcide31 Mar 19410757Messina31 Mar 19411421Augusta68Passage Messina-Augusta.

6Bardi, Alcide3 Apr 19411357Augusta9 Apr 19411115Augusta584,5Patrolled east of Malta within 15 miles from 35°00'N, 16°00'E on a NE-SW axis.. Uneventful.

7Bardi, Alcide15 Apr 19412220Augusta4 May 19411311Messina1882Patrolled off Cyrenaica and Egypt, within 20 miles from 32°20'N, 25°40'E on a NE-SW axis.
  23 Apr 1941024433° 26'N, 26° 23'EA cruiser of the LEANDER class on a NNW course was first sighted at 0237 hours at a distance of 4,000 metres. Seven minutes later, the submarine remaining on the surface, fired two bow torpedoes (533mm) as the range had closed to 2,000 metres. They missed. This was perhaps the light cruiser HMAS Perth ?
  23 Apr 19410246.533° 26'N, 26° 23'EA third torpedo was fired at the same cruiser and the submarine immediately submerged. Three explosions were heard after ten minutes, but they were probably the torpedoes hitting the bottom.

Bardi, Alcide3 Jun 19410810Messina3 Jun 19411820Messina73Exercises.

Bardi, Alcide6 Jun 19410810Messina6 Jun 19411615Messina68Exercises.

Bardi, Alcide28 Jun 19410805Messina28 Jun 19411240Messina38Exercises.

8Bardi, Alcide5 Jul 19412002Messina19 Jul 19411403Messina2130Patrolled north-east of Ras Azzaz, through Point G (30°20'N, 25°40'E) and Point Y (32°05'N, 25°40'E) to area between 32°00'N and 32°15'N, and between 25°00'E and 25°20'E.
  10 Jul 19410025
0100 (e)

(e) 32° 07'N, 24° 59'E
Two motorboats were sighted a range of 1,500 metres and the submarine opened fire with her main armament and her Breda machine guns. After the third 102mm round, the gun jammed, however, hits were claimed with the machine guns after 250 13,2mm rounds were fired. The target was apparently a Eureka boat on passage from Tobruk to Mersa Matruh. No mention of damage was made.
  11 Jul 19410330
(0) North of Cyrenaic coast.
Two destroyers, proceeding at high speed steering 110°, were observed from a distance of 8-9,000 metres, but they passed out of range.
  13 Jul 19410436
0600 (e)

(e) 32° 03'N, 25° 53'E
At 0423 hours, an enemy unit was seen 7-8,000 metres ahead and the submarine proceeded at full speed to the attack. At 0436 hours, the distance had dropped to about 2,000 metres and a torpedo was fired from the surface to the target, now identified as a destroyer, but without success. Luigi Settembrini submerged eight minutes later, as the enemy warship turned toward her. However, the submarine returned to periscope depth when the enemy did not show much aggressiveness, but a second destroyer now appeared on the scene at a distance of 3,000 m. The submarine had remained at periscope depth, when one of the destroyers suddenly increased speed and made straight for the submarine, which was forced to go deep. Bardi had ordered tubes no.5 and 7 to be ready for a stern shot, but was now forced to disengage. At 0504 hours, three depth charges exploded near the submarine and about a minute later another four more exploded but further away . The submarine was slightly damaged but escaped by going down to 90 metres. The destroyers were HMS Hero and HMAS Voyager, on passage from Tobruk to Alexandria. The Australian destroyer had first sighted the Italian submarine, but it was HMS Hero who delivered the attack, dropping six depth charges set at medium depth. The two destroyers did not linger on the scene and resumed their passage.
  14 Jul 19411407
(e) 32° 03'N, 25° 53'E
A two-funneled steamer was observed. The submarine closed to attack at a distance of 2,000 metres, but the vessel (approximately 4-5,000) tons appeared to be abandoned very near the coast and had perhaps run aground. It was not considered worth of expending a torpedo on her and the attack was aborted.
  14 Jul 19412104
(e) 32° 03'N, 25° 53'E
A section of destroyers was observed at a distance of 5,000 metres, on a 270° course, at high speed. The range could not be closed and no attack was attempted.
  15 Jul 19410305
(e) 32° 03'N, 25° 53'E
A pair of destroyers were observed on a 100° course at speed of at least 25 knots. The range could not be closed and no attack was attempted.
  15 Jul 19410400-044031° 58'N, 24° 59'EWhat appeared to be a small vessel was observed, at a short distance, as the submarine was cruising on the surface. Gun fire was about to be opened, when the gunnery 2nd officer remarked that the target may be an Italian submarine. However, another unit appeared shortly after, very similar to the first one. As it was improbable to be in the presence of two Italian submarines, gunfire was opened with the deck gun targeting the vessel to starboard and the machine guns dealing with the vessel to port at about 600 metres. However, after the fifth round, the 102mm gun jammed and the action was broken off although some hits were claimed, the Breda machine guns having expended 400 13.2mm rounds. These were probably the British Army lighters A-10 and A-11 on their way to Tobruk.
  15 Jul 1941231031° 58'N, 24° 59'E
(0) North of Cyrenaic coast near Ras Azzaz.
Two small vessels were observed, similar the ones encountered earlier in the day. Fire was opened with the Breda machine guns from a distance of 1,000 metres. As the deck gun was still not operable, Bardi did not insist and after firing 250 13.2mm rounds, he decided to break off the action. These were probably the Army lighters A-10 and A-11. A-10 was later attacked by Junkers 87 dive-bombers and sunk.
  16 Jul 19410135-0226
(0) North of Cyrenaic coast.
A vessel was observed which later proved to be a 600-700-ton tanker and the submarine opened fire with heavy and light machine-guns (the deck gun was still inoperable) and attempted to launch a 450mm torpedo from the bow tube set at a depth of 3 metres, but it misfired. C.C. Bardi ordered a second torpedo to be fired from a bow tube (533mm) also set a depth of 3 metres, but it appeared to pass under the target. The bow tubes were now empty and as the submarine did not carry reloads. Bardi decided to ram the vessel and the shock was violent. The vessel now appeared to be sinking slowly and Luigi Settembrimi circled to pick up survivors but despite shouting to them on the megaphone, no one answered.

The vessel was still afloat and Bardi decided to finish her off with a stern shot (450mm) from 500 metres. Although the torpedo had been set to a depth of 2 metres and appeared to go hit the squarely amidship, no explosion ensued and it must again have missed under. Another torpedo fired from stern set at a depth of 0 metres had the same result. Frustrated, Bardi could only order machine-gun fire to aim at the waterline hoping they would speed up the sinking. A total of 900 13.2mm and 200 6.5mm rounds were fired before the submarine left the scene. The target may have been the British Army lighter A-10 which was reported missing at that time and may have been damaged by Junkers 87.

Bardi, Alcide19 Aug 19410810Messina19 Aug 19411355Messina37,5Trials.

Bardi, Alcide22 Aug 19410835Messina22 Aug 19411730Messina80,5Trials and exercises.

Bardi, Alcide24 Aug 19410038Messina24 Aug 19410703Augusta75Passage Messina-Augusta.

Bardi, Alcide29 Aug 19410815Augusta29 Aug 19411130Augusta23Exercises.

Bardi, Alcide1 Sep 1941Time?Augusta1 Sep 1941Time?Augusta49Exercises.

9Bardi, Alcide3 Sep 19411858Augusta18 Sep 19411911Augusta1765Patrolled off Ras Mustafa. Sighted many ships, but all were French or Italian.
  4 Sep 19412335-2352
2345 (e)
36° 28'N, 11° 05'ELuigi Settembrini encountered the Italian tug Nettuno towing the sailing vessel Giuseppe Bertolli who were proceeding from Hammamet to Pantelleria. Nettuno opened fire on the submarine mistaking it for British. The submarine replied with her deck gun claiming three 102mm hits (only one actually hit) and with her machine-guns. The crew of the tug abandoned ship in two lifeboats. When the identity was ascertained, they returned to their vessel with one crew member slightly wounded. The tug was still in condition to continue her voyage and the submarine left the scene at 0115 hours on the 5th.

Bardi, Alcide19 Sep 19411104Augusta19 Sep 19411736Messina75Passage Augusta-Messina.

Bardi, Alcide7 Oct 19410806Messina7 Oct 19411200Messina24,5Exercises, escorted by motorboat Marzano (A.S.67).

Resio, Mario16 Oct 19410818Messina16 Oct 19411143Messina25Exercises.

Resio, Mario17 Oct 19410200Messina17 Oct 19410919Augusta78Passage Messina-Augusta.

10Resio, Mario18 Oct 19410040Augusta21 Oct 19411258Augusta453,2Patrolled southeast of Pantelleria, between 36°30'N and 36°40'N, and between 12°20'E and 12°40'E. Uneventful.

Resio, Mario1 Nov 19410814Augusta1 Nov 19411202Augusta31Trials.

Resio, Mario3 Nov 19410845Augusta3 Nov 19411458Messina78Passage Augusta-Messina.

11Resio, Mario7 Nov 19410929Messina10 Nov 19411430Messina514Patrolled east of Cape Passero between 36°00'N and 36°40'N, and between 16°00'E and 16°20'E. Heard H.E. of a naval force, which passed out of range on 9th November.
  8 Nov 1941
0418 (e)

(e) 36° 19'N, 16° 22'E
Luigi Settembrini had surfaced for a pause between hydrophone watches when she was missed by four torpedoes fired from HMS Upholder (Lt. Cdr. M.D. Wanklyn, DSO, RN). The British submarine was on the surface when, at 0403 hours, a U-boat was seen at a distance of 4,000 metres by the port lookout Chief Petty Officer Swainston, Coxwain of the submarine. He alerted the Officer of the Watch Sub-Lieutenant J.H. Norman, RNVR who pointed the submarine toward the enemy, ordered the engines stopped and then slow ahead as Wanklyn was summoned to the bridge. Wanklyn did not waste time and at 0405 hours, HMS Upholder had dived. From the periscope, the British Commanding Officer could identify the enemy as a PERLA, SIRENA or ARGONAUTA. At 0418 hours, he ordered the torpedoes fired at a distance of 1,500 yards. A very heavy explosion was heard, but back at periscope depth, it could still be observed apparently stopped but disappeared shortly after. The British submarine later came across what appear to be a patch of oil. Wanklyn claimed the submarine sunk. In fact, Luigi Settembrini was unscathed and not even aware of the attack.

12Resio, Mario21 Nov 19411130Messina3 Dec 19411620Messina1272,5Patrolled southeast of Malta between 34°40'N and 35°00'N, and between 16°00'E and 16°20'E (or 34°20' and 34°40'N, and between 15°40'E and 16°00'E?) on a patrol line with Delfino and Tricheco.
  22 Nov 1941215734° 20'N, 16° 01'EThe conning tower of a submarine in the process of submerging was observed. This was probably Tricheco, which had arrived earlier in the area and belonged to X.Grupsom. Luigi Settembrini may not have been aware of her presence in this specific area, although Guglielmotti, Argo and Tricheco were known to be in the general area. Contact could not be regained. There were no Allied submarine in the area.
  24 Nov 19410421-071034° 55'N, 16° 24'EThe submarine heard the H.E. of fast moving ships and correctly assumed they were enemies, but nothing could be seen. At 0448 hours, the submarine emerged to try to observe the ships and proceeded at full speed steering to 100° and, at 0503 hours, made a signal of discovery. Failing to see anything, Luigi Settembrini submerged to try to regain contact with her hydrophones and heard H.E. bearing 325°, course 135°. These were believed to be fast A/S vessels and contact was finally lost at 0710 hours, with the submarine reverting on a 087° course to regain her patrol area. This was Force K on its way to intercept the Maritza/Procida convoy. The message was acknowledged but the order to recall the convoy, made at 0630 hours, failed to get through and the two German tankers were sunk in the afternoon in 34°40' N, 21°00' E. The two escorts Lupo and Cassiopea managed to escape.
  25 Nov 19410804-093634° 55'N, 16° 24'E
(0) Approximately.
The submarine heard the H.E. of fast moving ships. This was most probably Force K retiring toward Malta.
  28 Nov 1941162434° 50'N, 16° 04'EThe submarine heard the H.E. of fast moving ships but saw nothing.
  29 Nov 19410008-021634° 50'N, 16° 04'EThe submarine heard the H.E. of fast moving ships but again saw nothing.
  29 Nov 19411416-160734° 50'N, 16° 04'EThe submarine heard more H.E. of fast moving ships but without sighting anything.

Resio, Mario8 Dec 19411150Messina9 Dec 19411040Taranto271Passage Messina-Taranto. Then long refit.

Pollina, Mario Paolo31 Jan 1942Taranto28 Mar 1942TarantoRefit at Taranto. Change in command.

Cunsolo, Giovanni28 Mar 1942Taranto22 Apr 1942TarantoRefit at Taranto. Change in command.

Cunsolo, Giovanni23 Apr 1942Taranto22 May 1942TarantoRefit at Taranto. Change in command.

Corvetti, Candido23 May 1942Taranto30 Jun 1942TarantoRefit at Taranto. Change in command.

Boris, Riccardo1 Jul 1942Taranto15 Aug 1942TarantoRefit at Taranto. Change in command.

Tei, Mario16 Aug 1942Taranto27 Aug 1942TarantoRefit at Taranto. Change in command.

Scano, Giacomo7 Sep 19421525Taranto7 Sep 19421830Taranto15Exercises.

Scano, Giacomo8 Sep 19420941Taranto8 Sep 19421655Taranto17Exercises.

Scano, Giacomo12 Sep 19420750Taranto12 Sep 19421907Taranto97,5Exercises.

Torri, Alberto20 Sep 19420840Taranto20 Sep 19421830Taranto109Exercises.

Torri, Alberto23 Sep 19420830Taranto23 Sep 19421710Taranto109Exercises.

Torri, Alberto24 Sep 19420805Taranto24 Sep 19421236Taranto26Exercises.

Torri, Alberto27 Sep 19421504Taranto29 Sep 19421727Pola528Passage Taranto-Pola. Uneventful.

Torri, Alberto7 Oct 19421009Pola8 Oct 19420730Pola2Tests.

Torri, Alberto10 Oct 19420800Pola10 Oct 19421325Pola34Exercises with the torpedo boats Uragano and San Martino and the tug Parenzo.

D'Alterio, Guido11 Oct 19420800Pola11 Oct 19421216Pola25Exercises.

D'Alterio, Guido13 Oct 19421300Pola13 Oct 19421754Pola35Exercises with torpedo boats Uragano and San Martino and the tugs Parenzo and Marittimo.

D'Alterio, Guido14 Oct 19420800Pola14 Oct 19421046Pola16Exercises.

D'Alterio, Guido14 Oct 19421802Pola15 Oct 19420215Pola35Exercises.

D'Alterio, Guido20 Oct 19420930Pola20 Oct 19421821Pola43Exercises.

D'Alterio, Guido24 Oct 19420825Pola24 Oct 19421258Pola25Exercises.

D'Alterio, Guido26 Oct 19420800Pola26 Oct 19420959Pola11Exercises.

D'Alterio, Guido29 Oct 19420800Pola29 Oct 19421210Pola21Exercises.

D'Alterio, Guido31 Oct 19421215Pola2 Nov 19421635Taranto524Passage Pola-Taranto. Uneventful.

Fraternale, Athos6 Dec 19420900Taranto6 Dec 19421100Taranto9Exercises.

13Fraternale, Athos7 Dec 19421130Taranto10 Dec 19420920TripoliSupply mission to Tripoli (40.564 tons).
  10 Dec 19420500
(0) Off Tripoli.
The Italian hospital ship Gradisca (13,868 GRT, built 1913) was observed.

13bFraternale, Athos10 Dec 19421230Tripoli13 Dec 19421250Taranto1234Return trip from supply mission to Tripoli [mileage is for round trip].
  10 Dec 19420500
(0) Off Tripoli.
The Italian hospital ship Gradisca (13,868 GRT, built 1913) was observed.

14Fraternale, Athos21 Dec 19421130Taranto25 Dec 19420800TripoliSupply mission to Tripoli with 45.384 tons of stores through (1) 38°40'N, 18°20'E (2) 34°00'N, 18°20'E. Uneventful.

14bFraternale, Athos25 Dec 19421500Tripoli28 Dec 19421300Taranto1202Return trip from supply mission to Tripoli through (1) 33°28'N, 13°40'E (2) 34°40'N, 17°30'E (3) Point P of Cape Colonne. Uneventful [mileage is for round trip]. Carried fourteen PoWs.

Fraternale, Athos26 Jan 19430730Taranto26 Jan 19431425Taranto41,5Trials.

Fraternale, Athos27 Jan 19430830Taranto27 Jan 19431430Taranto51Trials.

Romano, Domenico18 Feb 19431600Taranto21 Feb 19430746Pola601Passage Taranto-Pola. Uneventful.

Romano, Domenico23 Feb 19430805Pola23 Feb 19431240Pola24,5Exercises.

Romano, Domenico23 Feb 19431335Pola23 Feb 19431726Pola17Exercises.

Romano, Domenico26 Feb 19430815Pola26 Feb 19431215Pola15Exercises.

Romano, Domenico26 Feb 19431345Pola26 Feb 19431812Pola14Exercises.

Romano, Domenico2 Mar 19430810Pola2 Mar 19431155Pola22Exercises.

Romano, Domenico6 Mar 19430845Pola6 Mar 19431217Pola5Exercises.

Romano, Domenico9 Mar 19430820Pola9 Mar 19431210Pola19,5Exercises.

Romano, Domenico9 Mar 19431345Pola9 Mar 19431815Pola20,5Exercises.

Romano, Domenico11 Mar 19430808Pola11 Mar 19431247Pola19,5Exercises.

Romano, Domenico13 Mar 19430815Pola13 Mar 19431300Pola21Exercises.

Romano, Domenico13 Mar 19431405Pola13 Mar 19431835Pola21Exercises.

Romano, Domenico15 Mar 19430815Pola15 Mar 19431255Pola25Exercises.

Romano, Domenico15 Mar 19431405Pola15 Mar 19432025Pola25Exercises.

Romano, Domenico17 Mar 19430800Pola17 Mar 19431233Pola20,5Exercises.

Romano, Domenico17 Mar 19431505Pola17 Mar 19432233Pola27,5Exercises.

Romano, Domenico22 Mar 1943080Pola22 Mar 19430945Pola1Changed moorings?

Romano, Domenico26 Mar 19431515Pola27 Mar 19430055Pola41Exercises.

Romano, Domenico27 Mar 19430805Pola27 Mar 19431235Pola21Exercises.

Romano, Domenico27 Mar 19431500Pola27 Mar 19432020Pola24Exercises.

Romano, Domenico31 Mar 19430800Pola31 Mar 19431235Pola20,5Exercises.

Romano, Domenico31 Mar 19431510Pola31 Mar 19432400Pola25,5Exercises.

Romano, Domenico3 Apr 19430945Pola3 Apr 19431325Pola23Exercises.

Romano, Domenico7 Apr 19430804Pola7 Apr 19431245PolaExercises.

Romano, Domenico7 Apr 19431625Pola7 Apr 19432213Pola24Exercises.

Romano, Domenico8 Apr 19430812Pola8 Apr 19431325Pola37Exercises.

Romano, Domenico10 Apr 19431030Pola10 Apr 19431445Pola21Exercises.

Romano, Domenico10 Apr 19431513Pola10 Apr 19432010Pola27Exercises.

Romano, Domenico13 Apr 19430810Pola13 Apr 19431220Pola18Exercises.

Romano, Domenico13 Apr 19431700Pola13 Apr 19432220Pola19Exercises.

Romano, Domenico15 Apr 19430800Pola15 Apr 19431235Pola22Exercises.

Romano, Domenico16 Apr 19430815Pola16 Apr 19431115Pola18Exercises.

Romano, Domenico19 Apr 19431240Pola19 Apr 19431810Pola24Exercises with the torpedo boats Orsa and T.3 and MAS 535 and MAS 539.

Romano, Domenico24 Apr 19430825Pola24 Apr 19431225Pola22Exercises with the torpedo boat Orsa.

Romano, Domenico28 Apr 19431040Pola28 Apr 19431510Pola39Exercises with the torpedo boats San Martino and Pilo and the tugs Marittimo and No.90.

Romano, Domenico28 Apr 19431615Pola28 Apr 19432020Pola26Exercises.

Romano, Domenico1 May 19431405Pola1 May 19431905Pola22Exercises.

Romano, Domenico2 May 19430625Pola2 May 19431220Pola39Exercises.

Romano, Domenico3 May 19431430Pola3 May 19431925Pola22Exercises.

Romano, Domenico5 May 19431445Pola5 May 19431925Pola19Exercises.

Romano, Domenico8 May 19430930Pola8 May 19431200Pola5Exercises.

Romano, Domenico8 May 19431436Pola8 May 19431905Pola16Exercises.

Romano, Domenico10 May 19431400Pola10 May 19431900Pola22Exercises with the torpedo boat San Martino in Zone A/2, delimited by (1) 44°46.8'N, 13°37.5'E (2) 44°50'N, 13°33.5'E (3) 44°52.5'N, 13°46'E (4) 44°55'N, 13°42'E.

Romano, Domenico11 May 19431400Pola11 May 19431910Pola26Exercises.

Romano, Domenico12 May 19430815Pola12 May 19431705Pola15Exercises.

Romano, Domenico17 May 19430810Pola17 May 19431206Pola18Exercises.

Romano, Domenico17 May 19431600Pola17 May 19432010Pola16Exercises.

Romano, Domenico19 May 19430710Pola19 May 19431058Pola19,9Exercises.

Romano, Domenico19 May 19431403Pola19 May 19431852Pola30Exercises.

Romano, Domenico21 May 19430800Pola21 May 19431235Pola20Exercises.

Romano, Domenico21 May 19431355Pola21 May 19431904Pola25Exercises.

Romano, Domenico25 May 19430815Pola25 May 19431220Pola19Exercises.

Romano, Domenico25 May 19431400Pola25 May 19431900Pola25Exercises.

Romano, Domenico29 May 19430752Pola29 May 19431315Pola32Exercises.

Romano, Domenico29 May 19431445Pola29 May 19431910Pola18Exercises.

Meneghini, Teucle1 Jun 19430806Pola1 Jun 19431220Pola15Trials.

Meneghini, Teucle1 Jun 19431435Pola1 Jun 19431845Pola15Trials.

Meneghini, Teucle9 Jun 19430710Pola9 Jun 19431525Pola31Exercises with the torpedo boat Audace and the tug Molara.

Meneghini, Teucle9 Jun 19431550Pola9 Jun 19431844Pola18Trials.

Meneghini, Teucle15 Jun 19430755Pola15 Jun 19431327Pola32Exercises.

Meneghini, Teucle15 Jun 19431455Pola15 Jun 19431900Pola23Trials.

Frascolla, Renato17 Jun 19430935Pola17 Jun 19431310Pola19Exercises.

Frascolla, Renato18 Jun 19431410Pola18 Jun 19432020Pola15Demagnetization.

Frascolla, Renato19 Jun 19431435Pola19 Jun 19431857Pola22Tests.

Frascolla, Renato21 Jun 19430803Pola21 Jun 19431915Pola23Exercises.

Frascolla, Renato22 Jun 19430805Pola22 Jun 19431305Pola32Tests.

Frascolla, Renato22 Jun 19431439Pola22 Jun 19431852Pola24Tests.

Frascolla, Renato25 Jun 19430850Pola25 Jun 19431125Pola16,5Exercises.

Frascolla, Renato28 Jun 19430720Pola28 Jun 19431245Pola28Exercises.

Frascolla, Renato28 Jun 19431430Pola28 Jun 19431800Pola18Tests.

Frascolla, Renato30 Jun 19430735Pola30 Jun 19431250Pola31Exercises.

Frascolla, Renato30 Jun 19431430Pola30 Jun 19431915Pola25Exercises.

Frascolla, Renato1 Jul 19430815Pola1 Jul 19431203Pola21Tests.

Frascolla, Renato2 Jul 19430800Pola2 Jul 19431335Pola28Tests.

Frascolla, Renato8 Jul 19430800Pola8 Jul 19431335Pola38Tests.

Frascolla, Renato8 Jul 19431500Pola8 Jul 19431815Pola24Tests.

Frascolla, Renato10 Jul 19430815Pola10 Jul 19431125Pola22,5Tests.

Frascolla, Renato10 Jul 19431415Pola10 Jul 19431750Pola25Tests.

Frascolla, Renato15 Jul 19430015Pola16 Jul 19431520Brindisi392Passage Pola-Brindisi.
  16 Jul 19431408
1403 (e)

(e) 40° 41'N, 18° 18'E
(0) 050° - Cape Gallo (of Brindisi) - 10 miles.
A torpedo track was sighted crossing Settembrini's wake 200 metres astern. This was one of six torpedoes fired at her by HMS Tactician (Lieutenant Commander A.F. Collett, DSC, RN). The submarine increased speed and turned to starboard and a second torpedo missed her 15 metres astern. Frascola estimated that they were fired from 2,500 to 3,000 metres. Settembrini successively sighted the torpedo-boat Stocco and the submarine Menotti and informed them of the presence of the enemy submarine.

Frascolla, Renato27 Jul 19431340Brindisi27 Jul 19431925Brindisi25Trials.

Frascolla, Renato29 Jul 19431320Brindisi29 Jul 19431855Brindisi28Tests.

Frascolla, Renato9 Aug 19431954Brindisi12 Aug 19430710Taranto328Passage Brindisi-Taranto. Uneventful.

15Frascolla, Renato15 Aug 19430500Taranto23 Aug 19430730Taranto753,5Patrolled in Ionian Sea, between 37°49'N and 38°02'N, and between 15°36'E and 16°00'E.
  22 Aug 19430310-031538° 14'N, 17° 15'EA violent naval bombardment was observed coming from the direction of Crotone. The submarine attempted to close, but lost contact with the enemy force. Jalea also witnessed of the same bombardment.

16Frascolla, Renato3 Sep 19430208Taranto10 Sep 19431630Augusta998Sailed for patrol between 38°39'N and Italian coast, 16°45'E and 16°54'E, then diverted to Augusta to surrender.

Frascolla, Renato18 Sep 19430600Augusta18 Sep 19431650Malta119Passage Augusta-Malta.

Frascolla, Renato3 Oct 19430830Marsa Scirocco (Malta)3 Oct 19431100Sliema (Malta)17Passage Marsa Scirocco-Sliema (Malta).

Bruzzone, Antonio19 Nov 19431700Malta20 Nov 19431000Augusta110Passage Malta-Augusta with the submarines Brin, Squalo and Bandiera escorted by the Italian corvette Chimera.

Ridella, Giuseppe6 Apr 19441009Augusta7 Apr 19441855Taranto266Passage Augusta-Taranto. Refit until September.

Parodi, Eugenio6 Sep 19440907Taranto6 Sep 19441745Taranto44Trials.

Parodi, Eugenio11 Sep 19440845Taranto11 Sep 19441705Taranto48Trials.

Parodi, Eugenio16 Sep 19440900Taranto16 Sep 19441630Taranto41Trials.

Parodi, Eugenio26 Sep 19440904Taranto26 Sep 19441245Taranto22Trials.

Parodi, Eugenio27 Sep 19440817Taranto27 Sep 19441522Taranto50Trials.

Parodi, Eugenio13 Oct 19440715Taranto13 Oct 19441720TarantoExercises.

Parodi, Eugenio15 Oct 19440800Taranto15 Oct 19441615Taranto?Exercises.

Parodi, Eugenio20 Oct 19440730Taranto20 Oct 19441730TarantoExercises.

Parodi, Eugenio24 Oct 19441525Taranto26 Oct 19440900AugustaPassage Taranto-Augusta.

Parodi, Eugenio29 Oct 19440600Augusta29 Oct 19441630Malta114Passage Augusta-Malta, escorted by the torpedo boat Indomito.

Parodi, Eugenio30 Oct 19441600Malta3 Nov 19440314?Oran900Passage Malta-Oran, escorted by the torpedo boat Indomito.

Parodi, Eugenio3 Nov 19441600Oran4 Nov 19440900Gibraltar891Passage Oran-Gibraltar, escorted by the torpedo boat Indomito [mileage is estimated].

Parodi, Eugenio11 Nov 19440900Gibraltar15 Nov 19440221 GMTSunkPassage Gibraltar-Bermuda with convoy GUS-57. At 1530 hours on the 12th, Settembrini was detached to proceed to Horta Fayal Island (Azores) escorted by USS Frament (DE-677). At 0131 hours on the 15th, she collided with the destroyer escort in position 36°11'N, 19°45'W and sank. T.V. Parodi and seven men were saved, forty-two Italians and three Americans were lost. The destroyer escort USS Scott (DE-214) was sent to search for survivors and assist the damaged Frament, one plane of the air sea rescue was dispatched on 16/11 to search for survivors in 36°15'N, 18°22'W (yet Frament gave the position as 36°11'N, 19°45'W).
  15 Nov 1944
0121 (e)
36° 11'N, 19° 45'WThe destroyer escort USS Frament (DE-677) collided with the submarine who sank. Lt. Parodi and seven men were saved, forty-two Italians and three Americans were lost. The American liaison team on board Settembrini at the moment of her loss consisted of: Lt. (jg) Samuel Peter Bifarella, D-V(S), USNR, Radioman third class Caspar George DiMaggio 719 18 91, USN and Signalman second class Daniel D. Esposito 607 71 88, USN.

194 entries. 179 total patrol entries (16 marked as war patrols) and 29 events.

Events

GH 09.03.2021: This table kept here until we make fix the possible missing events in table above

CommanderDateTimePositionDescription
Alcide Bardi5 Jul 19400515(o) 189° - Cape Colonne 10.3 miles.A dark ship was observed moving northward with three small vessels. A single torpedo (533mm) was fired from No.1 bow tube angled at 030°, at a distance of 3,000 metres. Luckily, it missed. This was the Italian armed merchant cruiser Caralis (3,510 GRT, built 1928) and C.C. Bardi had not been informed of her passage. At this time, the submarine had lost contact with Ruggiero Settimo but they joined again at 0615 hours.
Alcide Bardi7 Aug 1940051535.40 N, 22.20 E
Two large destroyers had first been sighted at 0457 hours. At one point they appeared to be moving away, but they changed course and came back within range. On the spur of the moment, C.C. Bardi decided to fire a single torpedo from a distance of 3,000 metres, aimed at the second unit. It missed. The two vessels were possibly HMS Jervis and HMS Hostile, carrying an A/S sweep in the area of Elephonisi Island.
Alcide Bardi25 Oct 19400950-1055(o) Off Cyrenaica.The French hospital ship Sphinx was sighted.
Alcide Bardi26 Oct 19401818(o) Off Cyrenaica.An unknown submarine was observed at 5,000 metres and she quickly submerged. This was actually Dessié who mistook Settembrini for an Italian torpedo-boat and dived preventively.
Alcide Bardi24 Dec 19400527
0532 (e)
33.03 N, 22.39E
(e) 33.20 N, 22.43 E
At 0519 hours, a submarine was sighted bearing 020° on the port side at a distance of 4,000 metres, proceeding westward. Luigi Settembrini took an interception course and at 0527 hours, having closed to 1,200 metres, fired a single bow torpedo but it missed. Bardi gave the order to prepare for gun action, but then cancelled as the submarine appeared to be similar to Tembien. He took his submarine deep to disengage. This was HMS Otus (Lt. Cdr. E.C.F. Nicolay, RN) who reported being attacked by a MAMELI class submarine.
Alcide Bardi23 Apr 1941024433.26 N, 26.23 E
A cruiser of the LEANDER class on a NNW course was first sighted at 0237 hours at a distance of 4,000 metres. Seven minutes later, the submarine remaining on the surface, fired two bow torpedoes (533mm) as the range had closed to 2,000 metres. They missed. This was perhaps the light cruiser HMAS Perth ?
Alcide Bardi23 Apr 19410246.533.26 N, 26.23 E
A third torpedo was fired at the same cruiser and the submarine immediately submerged. Three explosions were heard after ten minutes, but they were probably the torpedoes hitting the bottom.
Alcide Bardi10 Jul 19410025
0100 (e)
(e) 32.07 N, 24.59 E
Two motorboats were sighted a range of 1,500 metres and the submarine opened fire with her main armament and her Breda machine guns. After the third 102mm round, the gun jammed, however, hits were claimed with the machine guns after 250 13,2mm rounds were fired. The target was apparently a Eureka boat on passage from Tobruk to Mersa Matruh. No mention of damage was made.
Alcide Bardi11 Jul 19410330(o) North of Cyrenaic coast.Two destroyers, proceeding at high speed steering 110°, were observed from a distance of 8-9,000 metres, but they passed out of range.
Alcide Bardi13 Jul 19410436
0600 (e)
(e) 32.03 N, 25.53 E
At 0423 hours, an enemy unit was seen 7-8,000 metres ahead and the submarine proceeded at full speed to the attack. At 0436 hours, the distance had dropped to about 2,000 metres and a torpedo was fired from the surface to the target, now identified as a destroyer, but without success. Luigi Settembrini submerged eight minutes later, as the enemy warship turned toward her. However, the submarine returned to periscope depth when the enemy did not show much aggressiveness, but a second destroyer now appeared on the scene at a distance of 3,000 m. The submarine had remained at periscope depth, when one of the destroyers suddenly increased speed and made straight for the submarine, which was forced to go deep. Bardi had ordered tubes no.5 and 7 to be ready for a stern shot, but was now forced to disengage. At 0504 hours, three depth charges exploded near the submarine and about a minute later another four more exploded but further away . The submarine was slightly damaged but escaped by going down to 90 metres. The destroyers were HMS Hero and HMAS Voyager, on passage from Tobruk to Alexandria. The Australian destroyer had first sighted the Italian submarine, but it was HMS Hero who delivered the attack, dropping six depth charges set at medium depth. The two destroyers did not linger on the scene and resumed their passage.
Alcide Bardi14 Jul 19411407(e) 32.03 N, 25.53 E
A two-funneled steamer was observed. The submarine closed to attack at a distance of 2,000 metres, but the vessel (approximately 4-5,000) tons appeared to be abandoned very near the coast and had perhaps run aground. It was not considered worth of expending a torpedo on her and the attack was aborted.
Alcide Bardi14 Jul 19412104(e) 32.03 N, 25.53 E
A section of destroyers was observed at a distance of 5,000 metres, on a 270° course, at high speed. The range could not be closed and no attack was attempted.
Alcide Bardi15 Jul 19410305(e) 32.03 N, 25.53 E
A pair of destroyers were observed on a 100° course at speed of at least 25 knots. The range could not be closed and no attack was attempted.
Alcide Bardi15 Jul 19410400-044031.58 N, 24.59 E
What appeared to be a small vessel was observed, at a short distance, as the submarine was cruising on the surface. Gun fire was about to be opened, when the gunnery 2nd officer remarked that the target may be an Italian submarine. However, another unit appeared shortly after, very similar to the first one. As it was improbable to be in the presence of two Italian submarines, gunfire was opened with the deck gun targeting the vessel to starboard and the machine guns dealing with the vessel to port at about 600 metres. However, after the fifth round, the 102mm gun jammed and the action was broken off although some hits were claimed, the Breda machine guns having expended 400 13.2mm rounds. These were probably the British Army lighters A-10 and A-11 on their way to Tobruk.
Alcide Bardi15 Jul 1941231031.58 N, 24.59 E
(o) North of Cyrenaic coast near Ras Azzaz.
Two small vessels were observed, similar the ones encountered earlier in the day. Fire was opened with the Breda machine guns from a distance of 1,000 metres. As the deck gun was still not operable, Bardi did not insist and after firing 250 13.2mm rounds, he decided to break off the action. These were probably the Army lighters A-10 and A-11. A-10 was later attacked by Junkers 87 dive-bombers and sunk.
Alcide Bardi16 Jul 19410135-0226(o) North of Cyrenaic coast.A vessel was observed which later proved to be a 600-700-ton tanker and the submarine opened fire with heavy and light machine-guns (the deck gun was still inoperable) and attempted to launch a 450mm torpedo from the bow tube set at a depth of 3 metres, but it misfired. C.C. Bardi ordered a second torpedo to be fired from a bow tube (533mm) also set a depth of 3 metres, but it appeared to pass under the target. The bow tubes were now empty and as the submarine did not carry reloads. Bardi decided to ram the vessel and the shock was violent. The vessel now appeared to be sinking slowly and Luigi Settembrimi circled to pick up survivors but despite shouting to them on the megaphone, no one answered.

The vessel was still afloat and Bardi decided to finish her off with a stern shot (450mm) from 500 metres. Although the torpedo had been set to a depth of 2 metres and appeared to go hit the squarely amidship, no explosion ensued and it must again have missed under. Another torpedo fired from stern set at a depth of 0 metres had the same result. Frustrated, Bardi could only order machine-gun fire to aim at the waterline hoping they would speed up the sinking. A total of 900 13.2mm and 200 6.5mm rounds were fired before the submarine left the scene. The target may have been the British Army lighter A-10 which was reported missing at that time and may have been damaged by Junkers 87.
Alcide Bardi4 Sep 19412335-2352
2345 (e)
36.28 N, 11.05 E
Luigi Settembrini encountered the Italian tug Nettuno towing the sailing vessel Giuseppe Bertolli who were proceeding from Hammamet to Pantelleria. Nettuno opened fire on the submarine mistaking it for British. The submarine replied with her deck gun claiming three 102mm hits (only one actually hit) and with her machine-guns. The crew of the tug abandoned ship in two lifeboats. When the identity was ascertained, they returned to their vessel with one crew member slightly wounded. The tug was still in condition to continue her voyage and the submarine left the scene at 0115 hours on the 5th.
Mario Resio8 Nov 1941
0418 (e)
(e) 36.19 N, 16.22 E
Luigi Settembrini had surfaced for a pause between hydrophone watches when she was missed by four torpedoes fired from HMS Upholder (Lt. Cdr. M.D. Wanklyn, DSO, RN). The British submarine was on the surface when, at 0403 hours, a U-boat was seen at a distance of 4,000 metres by the port lookout Chief Petty Officer Swainston, Coxwain of the submarine. He alerted the Officer of the Watch Sub-Lieutenant J.H. Norman, RNVR who pointed the submarine toward the enemy, ordered the engines stopped and then slow ahead as Wanklyn was summoned to the bridge. Wanklyn did not waste time and at 0405 hours, HMS Upholder had dived. From the periscope, the British Commanding Officer could identify the enemy as a PERLA, SIRENA or ARGONAUTA. At 0418 hours, he ordered the torpedoes fired at a distance of 1,500 yards. A very heavy explosion was heard, but back at periscope depth, it could still be observed apparently stopped but disappeared shortly after. The British submarine later came across what appear to be a patch of oil. Wanklyn claimed the submarine sunk. In fact, Luigi Settembrini was unscathed and not even aware of the attack.
Mario Resio22 Nov 1941215734.20 N, 16.01 E
The conning tower of a submarine in the process of submerging was observed. This was probably Tricheco, which had arrived earlier in the area and belonged to X.Grupsom. Luigi Settembrini may not have been aware of her presence in this specific area, although Guglielmotti, Argo and Tricheco were known to be in the general area. Contact could not be regained. There were no Allied submarine in the area.
Mario Resio24 Nov 19410421-071034.55 N, 16.24 E
The submarine heard the H.E. of fast moving ships and correctly assumed they were enemies, but nothing could be seen. At 0448 hours, the submarine emerged to try to observe the ships and proceeded at full speed steering to 100° and, at 0503 hours, made a signal of discovery. Failing to see anything, Luigi Settembrini submerged to try to regain contact with her hydrophones and heard H.E. bearing 325°, course 135°. These were believed to be fast A/S vessels and contact was finally lost at 0710 hours, with the submarine reverting on a 087° course to regain her patrol area. This was Force K on its way to intercept the Maritza/Procida convoy. The message was acknowledged but the order to recall the convoy, made at 0630 hours, failed to get through and the two German tankers were sunk in the afternoon in 34°40' N, 21°00' E. The two escorts Lupo and Cassiopea managed to escape.
Mario Resio25 Nov 19410804-093634.55 N, 16.24 E
(o) Approximately.
The submarine heard the H.E. of fast moving ships. This was most probably Force K retiring toward Malta.
Mario Resio28 Nov 1941162434.50 N, 16.04 E
The submarine heard the H.E. of fast moving ships but saw nothing.
Mario Resio29 Nov 19410008-021634.50 N, 16.04 E
The submarine heard the H.E. of fast moving ships but again saw nothing.
Mario Resio29 Nov 19411416-160734.50 N, 16.04 E
The submarine heard more H.E. of fast moving ships but without sighting anything.
Athos Fraternale10 Dec 19420500(o) Off Tripoli.The Italian hospital ship Gradisca (13,868 GRT, built 1913) was observed.
Athos Fraternale18 Dec 1942170033.52 N, 16.36 E
The wreck of an Italian S.82 aircraft was sighted at 2,500 metres. The submarine closed to investigate but found no survivors.
Renato Frascolla16 Jul 19431408
1403 (e)
(e) 40.41 N, 18.18 E
(o) 050° - Cape Gallo (of Brindisi) - 10 miles.
A torpedo track was sighted crossing Settembrini's wake 200 metres astern. This was one of six torpedoes fired at her by HMS Tactician (Lieutenant Commander A.F. Collett, DSC, RN). The submarine increased speed and turned to starboard and a second torpedo missed her 15 metres astern. Frascola estimated that they were fired from 2,500 to 3,000 metres. Settembrini successively sighted the torpedo-boat Stocco and the submarine Menotti and informed them of the presence of the enemy submarine.
Renato Frascolla22 Aug 19430310-031538.14 N, 17.15 E
A violent naval bombardment was observed coming from the direction of Crotone. The submarine attempted to close, but lost contact with the enemy force. Jalea also witnessed of the same bombardment.
Eugenio Parodi15 Nov 1944
0121 (e)
36.11 N, 19.45 W
The destroyer escort USS Frament (DE-677) collided with the submarine who sank. Lt. Parodi and seven men were saved, forty-two Italians and three Americans were lost. The American liaison team on board Settembrini at the moment of her loss consisted of: Lt. (jg) Samuel Peter Bifarella, D-V(S), USNR, Radioman third class Caspar George DiMaggio 719 18 91, USN and Signalman second class Daniel D. Esposito 607 71 88, USN.

All Italian submarines