Italian submarines in World War Two


Dandolo ( DO, I.16)
Dandolo

TypeOcean going 
ClassMarcello (12) 
Laid down 14 Jun 1937 Cantieri Riuniti dell'Adriatico, Monfalcone
Launched20 Nov 1937
Commissioned25 Mar 1938
End service
Stricken1 Feb 1948
Loss date
Loss position
History In June 1943, was proposed as a transport submarine, code name "AQUILA XI". Stricken on 1st February 1948.
Fate

Commands

CommanderDate fromDate toCommand
C.C. Riccardo Boris16 Dec 193910 May 1941
T.V. Walter Auconi11 May 194125 Feb 1942
T.V. Gaetano Di Meglio26 Feb 194211 May 1942
S.T.V. Sergio Gamba12 May 194223 Jun 1942
C.C. Alberto Campanella24 Jun 194224 Aug 1942
S.T.V. Sergio Gamba25 Aug 194231 Aug 1942
C.C. Alberto Torri31 Aug 194218 Sep 1942
T.V. Giacomo Scano18 Sep 194211 Mar 1943
T.V. Aldo Turcio18 Mar 194331 Dec 1944
C.C. Leone Monteleoni1 Jan 19459 Feb 1946

Patrols and events

 CommanderDateTimePortArr. dateArr. timeArr. portMilesDescription
1Boris, Riccardo5 Jun 19402000Naples17 Jun 19401820Naples1926,4Patrolled 13 miles southeast of Cape Palos, Spain.
  13 Jun 19400725
0940 (e)
37° 00'N, 0° 17'W
(e) 37° 10'N, 0° 10'E
(0) 120° - Cape Palos - 46 miles.
At 0644 hours, the hydrophones had detected an enemy formation. At 0713 hours, it was recognised as three cruisers screened by destroyers. Twelve minutes later, two torpedoes were fired from the bow tubes (533mm) at a distance of 1,600 metres aimed at the third cruiser. They missed. These were the French light cruisers La Galissonière, Jean de Vienne, Marseillaise, escorted by destroyers Brestois and Boulonnais. They were alerted by two of their float planes and took avoiding action. One torpedo passed between La Galissonière and Jean De Vienne, missing the latter by 20 meters ahead.
  13 Jun 19400725+
0625 (e)
37° 00'N, 0° 17'W
(0) 45 miles SE of Cape Palos.
The French cruiser squadron had sent two float planes to scout ahead, HS 35 from La Galissonière and HS 36 from Jean de Vienne. HS 36 sighted the periscope on the port side of the 3rd D.C.T. and dived on it without attacking it as the aircraft was armed with bombs. As HS 35 also closed, she sighted the launching of the two torpedoes and dropped a bomb. The submarine was going deep after firing her torpedoes and had just reached a depth of 20 meters when she was badly shaken by the bomb. La Galissonnière dropped 12 depth-charges and the French Admiral ordered the destroyers of the 5th D.C.T. (Brestois and Boulonnais) to hunt the submarine. They dropped each three grenades without result, the submarine had gone down to 118 meters. At 0702 hours, the destroyer Typhon, who was also escorting the battleship Provence, sighted a bubble attributed to a torpedo launch and dropped six depth-charges without result. Dandolo reported them at 0809 hours (Rome Time) to her starboard side.

Boris, Riccardo21 Jun 19402000Naples21 Jun 19401820Naples1,5Docked?

Boris, Riccardo24 Jun 19401337Naples24 Jun 19401403Naples1,5Undocked?

Boris, Riccardo27 Jun 19400930Naples27 Jun 19401325Naples21Trials.

2Boris, Riccardo27 Jun 19401835Naples16 Jul 19400820Naples2990Sailed with Barbarigo and patrolled in 36°20'N, 01°40'W near Cape Palos and Cape De Gata.
  3 Jul 19401910-2140
(0) Near Cape Palos.
An enemy escort vessel dropped depth-charges on the submarine.

Boris, Riccardo22 Jul 19401100Naples22 Jul 19401130Naples0,8Docked?

Boris, Riccardo28 Jul 19400715Naples28 Jul 19400815Naples0,8Undocked?

Boris, Riccardo6 Aug 19400900Naples6 Aug 19401711Naples29,5Trials.

3Boris, Riccardo8 Aug 19402240Naples10 Sep 19401620Bordeaux4267,2Passage to Bordeaux and patrolled between 36°00'N and 38°00'N. Passed Gibraltar on 16th August 1940.
  21 Aug 19402345
2050 (e)
36° 57'N, 13° 37'W
(e) 36° 56'N, 13° 15'W
At 2030 hours, a tanker estimated at 10,000 tons or more, was observed on a 250° course. The submarine trailed her until 2345 hours, when a single torpedo (533mm, W type) was fired and hit the target. This was the Dutch tanker Hermes (3768 GRT, built 1914) proceeding to England. The torpedo caused a large hole on the port side forward. She was abandoned but, as she did show any sign of sinking, the crew returned on board and brought her to Lisbon. There were no casualties.
  26 Aug 1940200037° 13'N, 21° 43'W
(e) 37° 10'N, 21° 50'W
At 1800 hours, a steamer was observed zigzagging and Dandolo maneuvered to take a position ahead of her for attack. She appeared to be an 8,000-ton armed steamer. At 2000 hours, a single torpedo (533mm, W type) was fired and struck the vessel in the aft hold and she sank in ten minutes. The victim was the British Ilvington Court (5.187 GRT, built 1919) carrying a cargo of iron ore from Freetown to Cardiff. Her crew of forty-six managed to reach Santa Maria Island (Azores) on 29th August.

Boris, Riccardo29 Sep 19400925Bordeaux29 Sep 19401010Bordeaux0,5Docked?

Boris, Riccardo2 Oct 19401010Bordeaux2 Oct 19401030Bordeaux0,5Undocked?

Boris, Riccardo11 Oct 19401615Bordeaux11 Oct 19401900Bordeaux20,5Trials.

4Boris, Riccardo12 Oct 19401540Bordeaux15 Nov 19401815Bordeaux4419,3Sailed for Atlantic patrol between 55°20'N and 56°50'N, and between 20°00'W and 23°55'W.
  20 Oct 1940185553° 12'N, 25° 34'WA steamer proceeding alone was sighted at a distance of 8,000 metres. The submarine attempted to close but was thwarted by the heavy seas and gave up the chase.
  27 Oct 1940175055° 36'N, 21° 46'WOn receipt of a signal from a U-boat, at 1300 hours, reporting a convoy in 56°15' N, 16°15' W, the submarine took an interception course. Nothing was seen and at 0620 hours on the 28th, the chase was abandoned.
  31 Oct 1940213055° 46'N, 22° 04'WDandolo received a signal from Malaspina (timed 1630/31) reporting a convoy in 57°15' N, 21°15' W and altered course to intercept. Heavy seas forced the submarine to abandon the chase.
  1 Nov 1940092755° 52'N, 20° 54'WA lone steamer steering 030° was sighted at 5,000 metres. Because of visibility conditions, C.C. Boris elected to intercept, submerged at full speed on electric motors, but could not catch up.

Boris, Riccardo16 Nov 19400830Bordeaux16 Nov 19400945Bordeaux1,5Docked?

Boris, Riccardo29 Nov 19400830Bordeaux29 Nov 19400945Bordeaux0,5Undocked?

Boris, Riccardo10 Dec 19401400Bordeaux10 Dec 19401445Bordeaux0,5Docked?

Boris, Riccardo15 Dec 19401500Bordeaux15 Dec 19401540Bordeaux0,5Undocked?

Boris, Riccardo17 Jan 19411145Bordeaux17 Jan 19411215Bordeaux0,5Changed moorings?

Boris, Riccardo18 Jan 19411415Bordeaux18 Jan 19411445Bordeaux0,5Changed moorings?

Boris, Riccardo22 Jan 19410945Bordeaux22 Jan 19411720Bordeaux2Trials.

5Boris, Riccardo24 Jan 19411620Bordeaux22 Feb 19411615Bordeaux3794Sailed for patrol (a) between 53°00'N and 54°00'N, and between 17°00'W and 20°00'W (b) between 54°00'N and 55°00'N, and between 20°00'W and 21°00'W (c) between 55°00'N 56°00'N, and between 21°00'W and 22°00'W. Met on her return by the German minesweepers M-2, M-6 and M-21 and Sperrbrecher 16.
  31 Jan 19412155
2015-2020 (e)
49° 04'N, 19° 31'WAt 1918 hours, a 6,500-ton tanker was sighted in 49°23' N, 19°35' W. At 2155 hours, Dandolo had closed to 500 metres to fire two torpedoes (450mm) from the bow tubes. They broke surface and missed. This was the British Pizarro (1,367 GRT, built 1923), a straggler from convoy O.G.51 from Oban to Gibraltar, carrying 1,500 tons of general cargo and 400 tons of mail.
  31 Jan 19412228
2030 (e)
49° 04'N, 19° 31'W
(e) 49° 03'N, 19° 40'W
At 2228 hours, two torpedoes (450mm) were fired from the stern tubes at a distance of 500 metres. This time both hit. Pizarro sank in 5 minutes with twenty-three of her crew. Three explosions had been felt on board Pizarro, but two were muffled and one was "terrific". There were six survivors who were picked up by the steamer MacBrae, another straggler from the same convoy.
  8 Feb 19411400-172053° 37'N, 18° 47'WAt 1400 hours, a steamer was observed zigzagging on a northeasterly course. The submarine attempted to trail her, but the chase would force her to exit her zone of operation. At 1952 hours, a submarine was sighted at 3,500 metres. This was Morosini who would attack this ship shortly after. The target was the Dutch steamer Prins Fredrik Hendrik (1288 GRT, built 1936).
  22 Feb 19410855-0857
(0) 283° of Pointe La Coubre - 14 miles (off Gironde).
The submarine sighted three torpedo tracks, the nearest passing 40 metres across her bows. The German submarine chaser UJ-E and the minesweepers M-10, M-13 and M-25 were sent to hunt, but located nothing. The "attack" was apparently bogus as no British submarines operated in the area. The "torpedoes" were probably porpoises.

Boris, Riccardo30 Mar 19410920Bordeaux30 Mar 19411500Bordeaux4Trials.

Boris, Riccardo7 Apr 19411220Bordeaux7 Apr 19411936Bordeaux49Trials.

Boris, Riccardo8 Apr 19410955Bordeaux8 Apr 19411440Bordeaux28Trials.

6Boris, Riccardo9 Apr 19411540Bordeaux27 Apr 19412011Bordeaux3188Sailed for Atlantic patrol between 35°00'N and 36°00'N, within 30 miles from the Moroccan coast. Patrol interrupted due to defects.
  16 Apr 19410540-055535° 26'N, 7° 14'WA shadow was sighted at 5,000 metres, it was identified as a battleship, escorted by two destroyers, on a 240° course. The submarine could not close the range to carry out an attack, but elected not to make an enemy report as these ships were going to pass outside the patrol areas of Italian submarines. These were most probably the battleship HMS Queen Elizabeth, escorted by three destroyers HMS Velox, HMS Wrestler and HMS Fury (local escort), which had sailed at 2205 hours on the 15th from Gibraltar for Freetown.

7Auconi, Walter13 Jun 19410910Bordeaux13 Jun 19411616Le Verdon54Passage Bordeaux-Le Verdon.

7bAuconi, Walter14 Jun 19410700Le Verdon14 Jun 19412050La Pallice92Passage Le Verdon-La Pallice with Bagnolini, escorted by Sperrbrecher 16 and exercises.

7cAuconi, Walter19 Jun 19412000La Pallice23 Jun 19410710La Pallice813Passage La Pallice-Naples, but developed defects off Cape Villano, and turned back.

7dAuconi, Walter26 Jun 19412020La Pallice7 Jul 19410710Naples2186Passage La Pallice-Naples. Passed Gibraltar on 2nd July 1941. Long refit. On 6th July, British Naval Intelligence was aware that she had returned to the Mediterranean. On 1st July, U-138 was informed that Dandolo would pass her, eastbound, in the next few days. [U-138 had however already been sunk at that date.]
  29 Jun 19410820-1215
(0) Off Lisbon.
At 0820 hours, the submarine sighted a steamer on a southerly course and took an intercepting course. At 1005 hours, the submarine had initially closed to use her bow tubes, but then elected to turn for a stern shot, when she recognised a vessel with Red Cross markings and broke off the attack. However, shortly after she intercepted an SOS indicating the vessel was the Spanish Earg (?).
  29 Jun 19412208
(0) Off Cape St. Vincent.
At a distance of 7,000 metres, the submarine spotted a destroyer coming toward her and dived to avoid being seen. C.C. Boris decided to delay the passage through the Straits if Gibraltar by one day.
  2 Jul 19410230
(0) Off Cape Tariffa (Morocco).
A destroyer or torpedo-boat was seen silhouetted against the Moroccan coast at a distance of 1,500 metres but Boris decided to continue his route on the surface and was not detected.

Auconi, Walter28 Aug 19410850Naples28 Aug 19411517Naples42Trials.

Auconi, Walter1 Sep 19410900Naples1 Sep 19411202Naples23Trials.

Auconi, Walter3 Sep 19411425Naples3 Sep 19412102Naples32Trials.

Auconi, Walter10 Sep 19410800Naples10 Sep 19411820Naples59Trials.

Auconi, Walter18 Sep 19410900Naples18 Sep 19411630Naples38Trials.

Auconi, Walter19 Sep 19410900Naples19 Sep 19411630Naples30Trials, escorted by the torpedo boat La Masa.

Auconi, Walter20 Sep 19411305Naples20 Sep 19411933Naples56Trials.

8Auconi, Walter23 Sep 19410645Naples4 Oct 19410910Naples1919Patrolled south of Balearic Islands in area between 37°10'N and 37°50'N, and between 01°00'E and 01°20'E. On 25th September, ordered to move 20 miles to the south.
  24 Sep 1941061038° 19'N, 8° 41'EA submarine, similar to Dandolo, was seen but could not be identified.
  29 Sep 1941064537° 17'N, 1° 07'EA destroyer was seen at 1,000 metres followed by two cruisers. The submarine attempted to make a bow attack. Auconi then decided to try a stern shot at 600 metres, but was thwarted by the appearance of a second destroyer and went deep.
  30 Sep 1941031837° 14'N, 1° 01'EFive destroyers were seen and the submarine took avoiding action.
  30 Sep 1941064837° 14'N, 1° 01'E
(0) Approximately.
Dandolo sighted a dark vessel coming at her at high speed. The submarine crash-dived but appeared to have been the subject of a systematic A/S search by four vessels. From 0925 to 1330 houra, Dandolo was severely depth-charged,with patterns from six to eight depth-charges.
  3 Oct 1941062538° 43'N, 9° 35'EAn unknown submarine was observed steering 200°, which was later reported as enemy (apparently none in area). Auconi ordered the gun crew to action station but decided to disengage.

Auconi, Walter20 Oct 19411355Naples20 Oct 19411920Naples40Trials.

Auconi, Walter22 Oct 19410950Naples22 Oct 19411830Naples43Trials.

Auconi, Walter24 Oct 19410905Naples24 Oct 19411323Naples32Trials.

9Auconi, Walter30 Oct 19411700Naples12 Nov 19411145Naples2317,3Sailed for patrol, initially along the Algerian coast, between 02°00'E and 03°00'E, within 10 to 20 miles from the coast. Then ordered between 36°00'N and the Moroccan coast, 02°40'W and 03°20'W (or between 37°40'N and 38°20'N, and between 04°20'E and 04°40'E?), as a sortie of Force H was expected.
  1 Nov 1941133538° 00'N, 7° 37'EA British bomber was sighted at 8,000 metres and the submarine dived.
  4 Nov 19410440-0552
0340 (e)
36° 44'N, 2° 29'EAt 0345 hours, a large steamer was sighted at distance of 8,000 metres and later identified as a 10,000-ton tanker. Although she was identified as French by her markings and by signals exchanged with Algiers, Auconi believed it might be a British tanker disguised as such and, just after 0440 hours, Dandolo opened fire with both her deck guns scoring hits while the target returned fire.

This was the Vichy tanker Tarn (4,220 GRT, built 1939) on passage from Casablanca to Algiers.

Dandolo now fired a salvo of three torpedoes from her bow tubes and scored one hit. The tanker Tarn was damaged and had two men killed.

At 0552 hours, Dandolo tried to finish off Tarn with a stern shot but missed. The tanker managed to reach Algiers at 1100 hours the same day.
  8 Nov 19410745
0700 (e)

(0) Bay of Melilla.
At 0720 hours, a merchant ship was sighted, which was poorly illuminated and did not show any national markings.

At 0745 hours, Dandolo fired a single torpedo from tube no.1 (her last torpedo available in the bow tubes). It appeared to have an erratic run initially, but 80 seconds later a hit was observed under the stern and the vessel sank in three or four minutes.

This was the second error Auconi committed on this patrol, as the target was the Spanish Castillo Oropesa (6,600 GRT, built 1917 [also listed as 5,177 GRT]). In ballast, she had left Barcelona for Melilla and was now awaiting permission to enter harbour to pick up iron ore for Gijon. There were no casualties. This was another embarrassing incident for Italian authorities, who tried to deny that the culprit was an Italian submarine. However, the Spaniards recovered fragments of the torpedo and identified it as of Italian manufacture. Officially, the Italian government refuted the accusations by stating that Italian torpedoes had been sold to Yugoslavia and the Netherlands and arguing this did not constitute a proof of Italian involvement.

Auconi, Walter6 Dec 19411003Naples6 Dec 19411615Naples43Trials.

10Auconi, Walter10 Dec 19411133Naples11 Dec 19410845Messina226,5Supply mission to Bardia via Messina. Phase 1. Uneventful.

10bAuconi, Walter12 Dec 19411605Messina18 Dec 19411800BardiaSupply mission to Bardia (18 tons: 2 tons of fuel, 16 tons of food supplies). Phase 2.
  13 Dec 1941093538° 10'N, 19° 04'EAn unidentified aircraft was seen and the submarine dived.
  13 Dec 1941143035° 50'N, 19° 46'ETwo unidentified aircraft were seen at 4,000 metres and the submarine dived.
  13 Dec 1941162035° 44'N, 19° 58'EA derelict mine was observed but not destroyed.
  15 Dec 1941082034° 05'N, 23° 30'EAn unidentified aircraft was seen flying low and the submarine dived.
  15 Dec 1941100734° 02'N, 23° 16'EAn unidentified aircraft was seen at 4,000 metres and the submarine dived.
  15 Dec 1941113533° 58'N, 23° 42'E
(0) Approximately.
An unidentified aircraft was seen at 5,000 metres, but the submarine remained on the surface as it appeared to be moving away.
  15 Dec 1941114533° 58'N, 23° 42'EAn unidentified aircraft was seen at 3,000 metres and the submarine dived.

10cAuconi, Walter18 Dec 19412150Bardia20 Dec 19410850Suda1384,5Return trip from supply mission to Bardia with fifteen PoWs (six British officers and nine other ranks). British Intelligence was aware of her passage through ULTRA decrypt.
  19 Dec 1941102533° 56'N, 24° 35'EAn unidentified aircraft was seen at 6,000 metres and the submarine dived.

11Auconi, Walter24 Dec 19411700Suda26 Dec 19411830BardiaSupply mission to Bardia (2 tons of fuel, 16 tons of food supplies). Uneventful.

11bAuconi, Walter26 Dec 19412200Bardia31 Dec 19411750Taranto1276Return trip from supply mission to Bardia (with ten Italian soldiers and ten Indian PoWs). Uneventful.
  27 Dec 19410935
0945 (e)
33° 08'N, 24° 46'E
(e) 33° 08'N, 25° 13'E
At 0935 hours, a twin-engine bomber was sighted at 1,500 metres and it made a recognition signal. At first, it was believed to be perhaps a German aircraft. But then as it closed to 200 metres, it was recognised as enemy and the submarine's twin Breda guns which had been manned opened fire but repeatedly jammed so Dandolo escaped by diving ten minutes later. This was a Beaufort of 39 Squadron.
  28 Dec 1941082034° 16'N, 22° 43'E
(0) Approximately.
An unidentified aircraft was seen, the submarine dived and heard distant explosions.
  31 Dec 1941035039° 25'N, 18° 04'EAn unknown vessel was sighted, probably an Italian submarine [Cagni, Millo and Mocenigo were expected to arrive in Taranto at about the same time]. This was probably Mocenigo.

Auconi, Walter26 Jan 19420855Bardia26 Jan 19421707Taranto65,5Trials.

12Auconi, Walter9 Feb 19421150Taranto25 Feb 19421400Augusta2088Patrolled north of Cyrenaica within 8 miles on meridian of 33°50'N 20°30'E with Mocenigo in an adjacent area.
  10 Feb 1942230038° 31'N, 18° 50'EUnknown submarine was sighted on opposite course, believed to be Mocenigo.
  14 Feb 19421034At 1034 hours, Dandolo was informed that a convoy of 22 ships was sighted at 0800 hours in 34°43' N, 21°45' E steering 310°. The submarine was just proceeding to intercept when, at 1100 hours, a signal was received reporting a second convoy at 0900 hours in 35°03' N, 17°55' E on a 105° course. Dandolo proceeded on a course to sight both convoys, but heard only very distant H.E. believed to be the convoy on the starboard side at 60 miles and the one on the port side at 90 miles.
  14 Feb 19421310At 1310 hours, the submarine was informed that a third convoy with a battleship, three cruisers and a number of destroyers was sighted at 1020 hours in 34°43' N, 18°55' E on a 120° course. This was probably Force B with convoy M.E.10. Auconi believed that this convoy would pass through Dandolo's position and at 1436 H.E. were heard from what was believed to be this convoy. At 1900 hours the submarine surfaced in 33°53' N, 20°26' E.
  14 Feb 1942200033° 53'N, 20° 26'EA derelict mine was observed.
  20 Feb 19420415At 0415 hours, the submarine was informed of a naval force located at 0330 hours in 33°03' N, 23°07' E. The submarine submerged for a listening watch, but nothing was detected.
  21 Feb 1942204533° 23'N, 23° 25'EA derelict mine was observed.
  24 Feb 1942061834° 51'N, 20° 40'EAt 0618 hours, the submarine Tricheco was encountered. She was in difficulty after suffering severe weather damage. The previous evening, at 2000 hours, Dandolo had been informed of her predicament and ordered by MARICOSOM to proceed to her assistance. Dandolo and Tricheco proceeded in company at 11 knots to Augusta.
  24 Feb 1942160035° 34'N, 19° 01'EA derelict mine was observed.

Di Meglio, Gaetano12 Mar 19420910Augusta12 Mar 19421141Augusta16Trials escorted by the auxiliary Nuovo Avvenire.

Di Meglio, Gaetano14 Mar 19420430Augusta15 Mar 19420940Cagliari440Passage Augusta-Cagliari.

13Di Meglio, Gaetano16 Mar 19421855Cagliari3 Apr 19420900Cagliari2263Patrolled south of Balearic Islands between 37°00'N and 37°20'N, and between 00°00'E and 01°20'E. Despite several opportunities, the submarine could not carry out any attack.
  20 Mar 19421400The submarine was informed that a force consisting of two aircraft carriers, a battleship and a cruiser had sailed from Gibraltar [these were the aircraft carriers HMS Eagle and HMS Argus, the battleship HMS Malaya and the light cruiser HMS Hermione escorted by the destroyers HMS Whitehall, HMS Wishart, HMS Laforey, HMS Duncan, HMS Active, HMS Anthony and the escort destroyers HMS Blankney, HMS Croome and HMS Exmoor) for Operation PICKET I]. This was amplified by a signal from the submarine Mocenigo, which was received at 2315 hours. Dandolo proceeded to take an intercepting position, but did not hear or see anything and was informed the next afternoon that the force had apparently reverted course to Gibraltar [they actually returned on 23rd March].
  22 Mar 1942122637° 24'N, 0° 04'EDandolo detected with her hydrophones a naval force steering 230°, 16 knots. The submarine could not make visual contact but made an enemy report.
  25 Mar 19421400Dandolo was informed that the British steamer Empire Kestul (sic?) would sail from Valencia to Gibraltar. The submarine took an intercepting position off Cape Palos, but only sighted a Swiss ship believed to be Eiger, arriving from the Balearic Islands, at 0605 hours on the 26th.
  26 Mar 19421100
(0) Off Cape Palos.
Dandolo was informed that the British steamer Etrib (1943 GRT, built 1913) would sail from Valencia to Gibraltar. The submarine remained off Cape Palos in the hope of intercepting the ship and only sighted the French ship Providence at 0340 hours on the 27th and another French vessel at 0526 hours.
  27 Mar 19420705
0603 (e)
37° 30'N, 0° 30'W
(e) 37° 20'N, 0° 44'W
At 0705 hours, an unknown submarine was seen at 700 metres. Dandolo prepared to make a recognition signal, but the submarine turned away and dived at 0607 hours. This was HMS HMS Upright (Lt. J. S. Wraith, RN) on passage from Malta to Gibraltar, she carried only two torpedoes and prudently avoided action.
  28 Mar 1942085037° 07'N, 0° 16'EDandolo detected a naval force with her hydrophones. It was later believed to be five destroyers conducting an A/S search, three of which passed over the submarine. The submarine took evasive action by diving to 70 meters.
  29 Mar 1942123537° 12'N, 1° 04'EAt 1235 hours, Dandolo detected a naval force with her hydrophones. Earlier, she had been informed by a signal from the submarine Brin, that the naval force was returning to Gibraltar and had moved to an intercepting position. The submarine could not immediately make visual contact but, at 1535 hours, she sighted what appeared to be a cruiser at long range.
  30 Mar 19421400Dandolo was informed of an enemy cruiser off La Galite on a 260° course. She was ordered to move 20 miles to the south (off Cape Tenes). This was executed, but no contact was made.

Di Meglio, Gaetano14 Apr 19421500Cagliari14 Apr 19421740Cagliari20Trials.

Di Meglio, Gaetano15 Apr 19420915Cagliari16 Apr 19422047Naples282Passage Cagliari-Naples.

Gamba, Sergio12 May 1942Cagliari23 Jun 1942CagliariRefit at Cagliari.

Campanella, Alberto30 Jun 19420955Naples30 Jun 19421726Naples58Trials.

Campanella, Alberto4 Jul 19420830Naples4 Jul 19421815Naples57Trials and gyrocompass tests.

Campanella, Alberto5 Jul 19421458Naples5 Jul 19422330Naples76Exercises.

Campanella, Alberto7 Jul 19420904Naples7 Jul 19421410Naples36Trials.

Campanella, Alberto8 Jul 19421400Naples8 Jul 19421541Naples23Trials.

Campanella, Alberto9 Jul 19421000Naples10 Jul 19421200Cagliari287Passage Naples-Cagliari.

14Campanella, Alberto13 Jul 19422100Cagliari23 Jul 19420945Cagliari1184Patrolled south of Majorca with Otaria and Emo on a patrol line between 37°40'N and 38°00'N, and between 02°20'E and 02°40'E. Briefly left her area westward to intercept a damaged enemy cruiser (HMS Charybdis) on 20th-21st July.
  19 Jul 1942134537° 27'N, 1° 57'E
(0) Approximate position.
At 1120 hours, Dandolo had been informed of an enemy cruiser and altered course to 225°. At 1345 hours, a Sunderland was suddenly sighted and the submarine quickly dived. Several bombs were heard between 1349 and 1410 hours but the submarine was not damaged.
  21 Jul 19420322
0332B (e)
37° 50'N, 2° 10'E
(e) 37° 48'N, 2° 05'E
At 0015 hours, Dandolo had submerged to carry a listening watch. At 0100 hours, several H.E. were heard and the submarine surfaced . At 0258 hours, nothing had been seen and Campanella decided to dive again. Two minutes later, sounds were heard from two groups of vessels, one bearing 185° and the other in 215°. At 0306 hours, Dandolo surfaced again and proceeded toward the first group at 13.5 knots. At 0317 hours, the lookout on the starboard aft station reported a large dark mass bearing 120° at a distance of 4,000 metres. It was identified as an aircraft carrier. This was HMS Eagle with the light cruisers HMS Charybdis and HMS Cairo, escorted by the destroyers HMS Westcott, HMS Wrestler, HMS Ithuriel, HMS Antelope and HMS Vansittart, returning to Gibraltar from operation INSECT.

At 0322 hours, the range had dropped to 2,000 metres when Dandolo fired a full salvo of four torpedoes from her bow tubes aimed at the aircraft carrier. This was a surface attack and the submarine dived upon firing. After two minutes two explosions were heard within three seconds of each other. In fact all torpedoes had missed. On board HMS Eagle, four underwater explosions were heard, one of them close.

Campanella, Alberto28 Jul 19420853Cagliari28 Jul 19421250Cagliari29Trials.

15Campanella, Alberto11 Aug 19421730Cagliari14 Aug 19420947Cagliari554,5Patrolled north of Tunisia with Emo and Otaria on a patrol line between 37°20'N and 38°00'N, and between 09°20'E and 09°40'E.
  12 Aug 1942180037° 39'N, 9° 45'EAt 1800 hours, an enemy naval squadron consisting of two battleships, an aircraft carrier, a cruiser and five destroyers was sighted at a distance of 9-10,000 metres, on a 090° course. Dandolo got as close as 7,000 meters before being attacked at 1830 hours by a destroyer which dropped four depth-charges causing some damage, notably to the periscope. The submarine escaped by going down to 120 meters. Some 120 depth-charges were heard until 2120 hours.
  13 Aug 19421530As Dandolo was returning to base following the damage incurred the previous day, she was informed at 1530 hours of a damaged aircraft carrier (believed to be HMS Furious). She reverted course in the hope of intercepting it but, at 1645 hours, a new signal came cancelling the previous report and the submarine returned to base.

Campanella, Alberto16 Aug 19421100Cagliari17 Aug 19420830Naples266Passage Cagliari-Naples.

Gamba, Sergio25 Aug 1942Naples31 Aug 1942NaplesRefit at Naples.

Torri, Alberto6 Sep 19420812Naples6 Sep 19421311Naples35Exercises and trials.

Torri, Alberto7 Sep 19421516Naples7 Sep 19422235Naples44Exercises and trials.

Torri, Alberto11 Sep 19420810Naples11 Sep 19421720Naples24Gyrocompass tests.

Torri, Alberto12 Sep 19420857Naples12 Sep 19421135Naples27Exercises and trials.

Torri, Alberto13 Sep 19420915Naples13 Sep 19421305Naples31Exercises and trials.

Torri, Alberto15 Sep 19420954Naples15 Sep 19421300Naples13Used in a propaganda movie.

Torri, Alberto17 Sep 19421013Naples17 Sep 19421830Naples49Exercises and trials.

Scano, Giacomo19 Sep 19421135Naples20 Sep 19420950Cagliari275Passage Naples-Cagliari.

Scano, Giacomo23 Sep 19421354Cagliari23 Sep 19421820Cagliari30Exercises and trials.

Scano, Giacomo25 Sep 19421348Cagliari25 Sep 19421755Cagliari30Exercises and trials.

Scano, Giacomo2 Oct 19421355Cagliari2 Oct 19421740Cagliari40Exercises and trials.

Scano, Giacomo5 Oct 19420811Cagliari5 Oct 19421248Cagliari29Trials.

16Scano, Giacomo10 Oct 19421750Cagliari19 Oct 19421440Cagliari1169Patrolled in Western Mediterranean, 50 miles north of Punta Taska, between 37°30'N and 38°00'N, and between 01°40'E and 02°00'E. Early return due to defects.
  11 Oct 1942085037° 43'N, 6° 08'EA German aircraft was seen at 5,000 metres and closed the submarine. They exchanged recognition signals.
  11 Oct 19421226At 1226 hours, Dandolo was informed that two destroyers had been sighted in 37°45' N, 00°05' E steering 285°. At 1800 hours, she was informed that the two destroyers were now in 37°10' N, 00°45' E steering 090°. Nothing was seen.
  11 Oct 19421825An unknown submarine on a westerly course was observed at 10,000 metres. Dandolo started to close but then turned away.
  19 Oct 1942094537° 08'N, 3° 42'EAt 0945 hours, the submarine Mocenigo was encountered and exchanged recognition signals.

Scano, Giacomo29 Oct 19420850Cagliari29 Oct 19421540Cagliari54Exercises.

Scano, Giacomo31 Oct 19420753Cagliari31 Oct 19421055Cagliari27Exercises.

17Scano, Giacomo7 Nov 19420248Cagliari10 Nov 19421355Cagliari532Patrolled in Western Mediterranean between 37°00'N and 38°00'N, and between 07°00'E and 07°30'E. Early return due to defects.
  8 Nov 1942090537° 14'N, 7° 40'EAn unidentified aircraft was seen at 5,000 metres.
  8 Nov 1942152537° 16'N, 6° 50'EDandolo was at periscope depth when, at 1525 hours, a smoke was sighted on the horizon. She closed to 600 metres and identified the vessel as French and assumed it was Gouverneur Général Lépine (3,509 GRT, built 1923), which was due in Philippeville at 1600 hours (according to the French Calendar no.38). Later, the submarine heard only H.E. and developed defects which forced her to abort her mission.

Scano, Giacomo12 Nov 19420700Cagliari13 Nov 19420835Naples299Passage Cagliari-Naples.

Scano, Giacomo20 Nov 19420909Naples20 Nov 19421355Naples63Trials.

18Scano, Giacomo21 Nov 19421609Naples22 Nov 19421510CagliariSailed for reconnaissance off Djidjelli, Bougie and Philippeville, but diverted to Cagliari due to defects.

18bScano, Giacomo23 Nov 19420106Cagliari5 Dec 19421025Cagliari1982Sailed for reconnaissance off Djidjelli, Bougie and Philippeville. On 2nd December 1942, ordered to Grids 4388 -0988 (between 37°20'N and 37°40'N and 07°00'E and 07°30'E), following the sinking of HMS Quentin by German bombers.
  25 Nov 19422253
(0) Off Bone.
At 2253 hours, two submarines were observed apparently exchanging recognition signals. Dandolo turned away.
  26 Nov 1942013236° 59'N, 5° 42'EAt 0132 hours, two submarine chasers were sighted and the submarine dived two minutes later.
  27 Nov 1942060037° 23'N, 7° 23'EAt 0600 hours, two submarine chasers were sighted and the submarine quickly dived.
  27 Nov 1942203037° 22'N, 6° 58'EAt 2030 hours, two dark shadows were observed at a distance of 2,000 metres which appeared to be large corvettes proceeding at 9 knots. Dandolo was surfaced and immediately fired a stern torpedo and turned to port, firing a second torpedo. Her gyrocompass was not operating and the helmsman could only use the magnetic compass. No hits were heard and, four minutes later, the submarine dived.
  29 Nov 19420525
(0) Off Philippeville.
At 0525 hours, Dandolo witnessed an air raid on Philippeville. Two minutes later, bombs were observed to fall 2,000 metres away and the submarine prudently dived.
  2 Dec 1942032936° 46'N, 7° 58'EAt 0329 hours, a corvette was sighted at 3,000 metres and Dandolo had her torpedo tubes readied but then lost her in a rain squall.
  4 Dec 19422239
2329 (e)
37° 59'N, 8° 10'EAt 2239 hours, a submarine chaser was sighted. Dandolo immediately dived and was shaken by the explosions of six depth-charges which caused some damage. Luckily, the enemy warship did not linger on and left the scene. This was actually the destroyer HMS Eskimo on her way to join the light cruiser HMS Aurora (C.S.12).

Scano, Giacomo13 Dec 19420910Cagliari13 Dec 19421155Cagliari?Trials.

Scano, Giacomo16 Dec 19420940Cagliari16 Dec 19421105Cagliari?Trials.

19Scano, Giacomo28 Dec 19421702Cagliari2 Jan 19431245Cagliari688Patrolled between 37°20'N and Algerian coast, 04°00'E and 05°00'E on a patrol line with Giada and Argo, off Bougie.
  1 Jan 1943050037° 14'N, 5° 14'E
(0) Italian Grid 6852/4.
At 0430 hours, Dandolo observed two dark shadows and closed. At 0500 hours, they were identified as a 10,000-ton merchant vessel escorted by a destroyer on a 134° course. Other shadows were seen at a distance, leading T.V. Scano to believe that they were part of a larger convoy. Four torpedoes were fired from the bow tubes at 2,500 metres. Two hits were heard, but this has not been confirmed.

20Scano, Giacomo4 Jan 19430430Cagliari6 Jan 19430813Cagliari287Patrolled between 37°20'N and 37°40'N, and between 09°20'E and 09°40'E but recalled shortly after arriving in the area. Uneventful.

Scano, Giacomo11 Jan 19431249Cagliari11 Jan 19431527Cagliari23Exercises.

Scano, Giacomo13 Jan 19430857Cagliari13 Jan 19431200Cagliari21,5Exercises.

Scano, Giacomo15 Jan 19431310Cagliari16 Jan 19431108La Maddalena218Passage Cagliari-La Maddalena.

21Scano, Giacomo20 Jan 19430230La Maddalena24 Jan 19431103Cagliari685Patrolled off Cape Bougaroni, between 37°20'N and the Algerian coast, and between 06°00'E and 06°20'E, with Malachite in an adjacent area,
  21 Jan 1943201137° 24'N, 6° 05'EAt 2011 hours, Dandolo observed firing in the distance and apparently an aircraft being shot down. She attempted to close and submerged to listen with her hydrophones, but nothing was detected until 0340 hours on the 22nd.
  22 Jan 1943034937° 25'N, 6° 06'EAt 0340 hours, a shadow was seen. It proved to be a large merchant vessel escorted by two cruisers and destroyers. Nine minutes later, Dandolo fired four torpedoes at a range of 3,000 metres and heard a hit after one minute and 51 seconds and another five seconds later. This has not been confirmed. The submarine was depth-charged and damaged, but escaped by going down to 120 meters. This was probably convoy K.M.S.7 going to Philippeville (seven ships).

Scano, Giacomo31 Jan 19430941Cagliari1 Feb 19431135Naples282,7Passage Cagliari-Naples.

Scano, Giacomo21 Feb 19430825Naples21 Feb 19431125Naples26Exercises.

Scano, Giacomo27 Feb 19430215Naples28 Feb 19430735Cagliari275,9Passage Naples-Cagliari.

Scano, Giacomo27 Feb 19432028Cagliari28 Feb 19430950Cagliari20Exercises.

Scano, Giacomo1 Mar 19430942Cagliari2 Mar 19430815Cagliari30,9Exercises.

22Scano, Giacomo2 Mar 19431645Cagliari5 Mar 19430640Cagliari361,5Sailed for patrol via Point D (38°30'N, 09°50'E) and 40°10'N, 11°30'E to an area between 38°20'N and the African coast, and between 04°40'E and 05°20'E (or 06°00'E?) then ordered back.

Scano, Giacomo5 Mar 19431700Cagliari7 Mar 19430724Naples281,6Passage Cagliari-Naples.

Scano, Giacomo13 Mar 19430816Naples13 Mar 19431120Naples22,8Exercises.

Scano, Giacomo14 Mar 19431320Naples14 Mar 19431450Castellammare di Stabia12Passage Naples-Castellammare di Stabia.

Scano, Giacomo16 Mar 19430831Castellammare di Stabia16 Mar 19431420Castellammare di Stabia28,2Exercises.

Scano, Giacomo17 Mar 19430827Castellammare di Stabia17 Mar 19431139Castellammare di Stabia25Exercises.

Scano, Giacomo18 Mar 19430856Castellammare di Stabia18 Mar 19431334Castellammare di Stabia26,5Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo20 Mar 19430840Castellammare di Stabia20 Mar 19431147Castellammare di Stabia22,2Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo21 Mar 19430836Castellammare di Stabia21 Mar 19431145Castellammare di Stabia18Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo22 Mar 19431311Castellammare di Stabia22 Mar 19431525Castellammare di Stabia19,3Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo26 Mar 19430825Castellammare di Stabia26 Mar 19431144Castellammare di Stabia21,3Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo30 Mar 19430835Castellammare di Stabia30 Mar 19431144Castellammare di Stabia22,2Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo5 Apr 19432400Naples7 Apr 19430840La Maddalena249,5Passage Naples-La Maddalena.

23Turcio, Aldo15 Apr 19431950La Maddalena4 May 19430904La Maddalena1791,5Patrolled between 38°00'N and 38°40'N, and between 06°20 and 07°00'E. On 27th April, was ordered to move to area between 38°00'N and 38°40'N, and between 07°00'E and 07°20'E.
  18 Apr 1943222038° 38'N, 6° 36'EAt 2220 hours, a German aircraft was sighted. No action was taken. Seven minutes later another two aircraft appeared and Dandolo submerged.
  26 Apr 19430408
0310 (e)
38° 23'N, 6° 26'E
(e) 38° 15'N, 5° 52'E
An unknown submarine was seen at a distance of 1,500-2,000 metres, steering 210°. She fired three torpedoes at Dandolo who turned away as two torpedoes passed on the port side and one on the starboard side. Turcio had intended to fire a stern shot, but the smoke emitted by his diesel engines obscured the visibility. This was the Dutch HrMs Dolfijn (Lt. Cdr. H.M.L.F.E. van Oostrom Soede) and she had fired three torpedoes at long range.

Turcio, Aldo5 May 19430959La Maddalena6 May 19430708Naples230Passage La Maddalena-Naples.
  5 May 1943130340° 57'N, 10° 08'EAt 1303 hours, a periscope was sighted. Dandolo attempted to fire a pair of torpedoes but only one left the tube, the second misfired. Range was 1,000 metres and two explosions were heard after four minutes. T.V. Turcio assumed that his torpedo had exploded at the end of her run and that the enemy submarine had done the same.

In fact, no allied submarine operated in the area.

Turcio, Aldo30 May 19430030Naples31 May 19430630La Maddalena230Passage Naples-La Maddalena.

Turcio, Aldo1 Jun 19430500La Maddalena1 Jun 19431130AjaccioPassage La Maddalena-Ajaccio.

Turcio, Aldo16 Jun 19431525Ajaccio18 Jun 19430255Naples302,4Passage Ajaccio-Naples.

24Turcio, Aldo14 Jul 19431330Naples18 Jul 19430730CrotonePatrolled off Augusta (Sicily), operation ZETA. At 2029 hours on the 16th, MARICOSOM ordered her to an area between 36°30'N and 36°50'N, and between 15°07 and 15°50'E. This was countermanded at 2345 on the 16th and she was ordered to Taranto via (1) 37°21'N, 17°00'E. (2) 39°00'N, 28°00? E (sic, should be 17°40'E, this was an error in transcribing the Italian Grid should have been 64 instead of 44) and A.2. At 1045 hours on the 18th, Dandolo was alerted by SUPERMARINA that an enemy submarine was in Grid 4734 (39°00'N, 17°00'E) at 0900 hours on the 18th.
  15 Jul 1943223037° 19'N, 15° 55'EAt 2230 hours, the conning tower of a submarine was seen, this was probably Alagi. Dandolo turned away.
  16 Jul 1943011637° 04'N, 16° 02'EAt 0116 hours, a dark object, believed to be a submarine, was observed. This was probably Alagi. Dandolo submerged.
  16 Jul 1943030737° 04'N, 16° 02'E
(0) Italian Grid 2866/5
At 0257 hours, a naval squadron was sighted at 5,000 metres. They were believed to be two battleships of the KING GEORGE V class escorted by four destroyers. Ten minutes, later, Dandolo fired a salvo of four torpedoes from her bow tubes at a range of 2,000 metres. Two loud hits were heard. This has not been confirmed. T.V. Turcio had also intended to turn and fire his stern torpedoes, but one of the torpedoes exploded after a run of 500 metres and fearing of being discovered, he took his submarine deep.
  17 Jul 1943003537° 15'N, 16° 14'EAn unidentified aircraft was seen and the submarine dived.
  17 Jul 1943030237° 02'N, 16° 14'EAn unidentified aircraft was seen and the submarine dived.
  17 Jul 19432230
1957 or 2203B (e)
37° 22'N, 16° 52'E
(e) 37° 17'N, 16° 53'E
At 2225 hours, Dandolo was suddenly attacked by an aircraft which appeared from the dark part of the horizon. It dropped four bombs and two depth charges. Two bombs hit the base of the conning tower and two bombs missed the stern, while the two depth-charges, estimated at 200 kg, lodged in the cavity of the counter turret. Luckily, those that hit failed to explode or Dandolo would have been destroyed, but the two depth charges prevented the submarine from diving for fear they would detonate. The aircraft was Wellington 'K' (MP617) of 221 Squadron piloted by Flying Officer W. Lewis. It had sighted a large Italian submarine, estimated at 1,000 tons armed with two guns, one fore and one aft. Lewis decided to attack up moon and approached from the port beam releasing five depth charges from a height of only 50 feet, the last depth charge observed to be exploding under the hull abaft while the rear gunner fired off 100 rounds of his machine gun. After the attack, the bomber remained in the area, observing the submarine still on the surface, circling tightly, smoke and fumes pouring from the conning tower. Lewis attempted to contact surface vessels in the area to home them in, but failed to get an answer. At 0020 hours, the aircraft left the scene. Dandolo abandoned her patrol and, at 2322 hours, informed MARICOSOM of her predicament and that she would be off Cape Colonne at 0600 hours.

24bTurcio, Aldo18 Jul 19432030Crotone19 Jul 19430650Taranto591Passage Crotone-Taranto, escorted by the corvette Scimitarra.

Turcio, Aldo9 Oct 19431230Taranto9 Oct 19431850Taranto39Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo20 Oct 19430825Taranto20 Oct 19431430Taranto47Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo25 Oct 19430732Taranto25 Oct 19431255Taranto31Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo2 Nov 19431345Taranto3 Nov 19431030Augusta259Passage Taranto-Augusta.

Turcio, Aldo5 Nov 19431346Augusta5 Nov 19431545Augusta5Supplied with water.

Turcio, Aldo18 Nov 19430710Augusta18 Nov 19430926Augusta5Supplied with water.

Turcio, Aldo18 Nov 19431110Augusta18 Nov 19431920Augusta46Exercises with the escort destroyer HMS Eggesford.

Turcio, Aldo22 Nov 19430920Augusta22 Nov 19431026Augusta3Changed anchorage.

Turcio, Aldo2 Dec 19430650Augusta2 Dec 19431658Augusta60A/S exercises.

Turcio, Aldo6 Dec 19430645Augusta7 Dec 19431755Taranto274Passage Augusta-Taranto with Giada, Brin, Mameli escorted by the torpedo boats Aliseo, Fortunale, Riboty, Abba, corvette Urania and the trawler HMT Grilse with convoy AH.11.

Turcio, Aldo14 Dec 19430930Taranto14 Dec 19431037Taranto0,6Docked.

Turcio, Aldo24 Dec 19430945Taranto24 Dec 19431430Taranto0,6Undocked.

Turcio, Aldo3 Jan 19441215Taranto5 Jan 19441510Pantelleria438Passage Taranto-Pantelleria with Marea, Mameli, Vortice and Speri escorted by destroyer Grecale.

Turcio, Aldo6 Jan 19441450Pantelleria6 Jan 19441510Pantelleria5Weather report mission.

Turcio, Aldo8 Jan 19440650Pantelleria9 Jan 19441905Algiers461Passage Pantelleria-Algiers with Mameli, Marea, Vortice and Speri, escorted by destroyer Grecale.
  9 Jan 19441102
1124 (e)
36° 47'N, 5° 37'E
(e) 37° 21'N, 4° 42'E
(0) German Grid CH 9525.
Goffredo Mameli observed an explosion 250-300 metres to starboard side and, shortly after, another about 250 metres to port. The escorting destroyer Grecale signalled that they were under air attack, but these were actually premature explosions from torpedoes fired by U-616 (OL Siegfried Koitschka). The Italians vessels were unaware that they had been under attack from a U-boat and, for security reasons, were diverted to Algiers.

Turcio, Aldo11 Jan 19440700Algiers13 Jan 19441240Gibraltar559Passage Algiers-Gibraltar.

Turcio, Aldo27 Jan 19440700Gibraltar27 Jan 19441240Gibraltar15Passage Gibraltar-Bermuda with Marea, Mameli, Vortice and Speri, escorted by the destroyer USS Neunzer (DE-150). They turned back as Tito Speri had engine defects.

Turcio, Aldo29 Jan 19440805Gibraltar13 Feb 19441543Bermuda3367Passage Gibraltar-Bermuda with Marea, Mameli, Vortice and Speri escorted by the destroyer escort USS Neunzer (DE-150). During the passage, carried out A/S exercises with Neunzer on 7th February. Escorted in by the tug USS Cherokee (AT-66).

Turcio, Aldo5 Apr 19440835Port Royal5 Apr 19441840Port Royal78Exercises with the minesweeper USS Despite (AM-89).

Turcio, Aldo8 Apr 19440705Port Royal8 Apr 19441845Port Royal85Exercises with the destroyer escort USS Jack W. Wilke (DE-800).

Turcio, Aldo9 Apr 19440652Port Royal9 Apr 19441730Port Royal62Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo13 Apr 19440653Port Royal13 Apr 19441809Port Royal8Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo14 Apr 19440630Port Royal14 Apr 19441855Port Royal61Exercises with TASK GROUP 23.1.

Turcio, Aldo20 Apr 19440705Port Royal20 Apr 19441904Port Royal90Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo21 Apr 19440630Port Royal21 Apr 19441904Port Royal98Exercises with the destroyer escorts USS Mason (DE-529), USS Riley (DE-579) and USS Weeden (DE-797).

Turcio, Aldo23 Apr 19440737Port Royal23 Apr 19441755Port Royal72Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer USS Ingraham (DD-694) and Task Group 23.1.

Turcio, Aldo24 Apr 19440705Port Royal24 Apr 19441713St. George87Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo27 Apr 19440712Port Royal27 Apr 19441713St. George66Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo28 Apr 19440700Port Royal28 Apr 19441904Port Royal87Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer USS Ingraham (DD-694) and Task Group 23.1.

Turcio, Aldo29 Apr 19440715Port Royal29 Apr 19442123Port Royal93Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo11 May 19440705Port Royal11 May 19441805Port Royal72Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo13 May 19440635Port Royal13 May 19441820Port Royal85Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer escort USS George A. Johnson (DE-583).

Turcio, Aldo14 May 19440640Port Royal14 May 19441710Port Royal76Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer escort USS George A. Johnson (DE-583).

Turcio, Aldo15 May 19440705Port Royal15 May 19441850Port Royal86Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer escort USS George A. Johnson (DE-583) and the frigate USS Sandusky (PF-65).

Turcio, Aldo16 May 19440552Port Royal16 May 19441735Port Royal89Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer escort USS George A. Johnson (DE-583).

Turcio, Aldo17 May 19440655Port Royal17 May 19441750Port Royal76Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer escort USS George A. Johnson (DE-583).

Turcio, Aldo18 May 19440653Port Royal18 May 19441902Port Royal89Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo19 May 19440600Port Royal19 May 19441750Port Royal100Exercises with the destroyers USS Bearss (DD-654), USS Mansfield (DD-728) and USS Brush (DD-745).

Turcio, Aldo21 May 19440650Port Royal21 May 19441746Port Royal84Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer escort USS Holton (DE-703).

Turcio, Aldo23 May 19440625Port Royal23 May 19441800Port Royal86Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer escort USS Holton (DE-703).

Turcio, Aldo24 May 19440630Port Royal24 May 19441746Port Royal88Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer escort USS Holton (DE-703).

Turcio, Aldo25 May 19440550Port Royal25 May 19441555Port Royal75Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer escort USS Holton (DE-703).

Turcio, Aldo27 May 19440638Port Royal27 May 19441750Port Royal80Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer escort USS Holton (DE-703).

Turcio, Aldo31 May 1944Time?Port Royal31 May 1944Time?St. George17Passage Port Royal-St George.

Turcio, Aldo6 Jun 19440655St. George6 Jun 19441740Port Royal79Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo7 Jun 19440650Port Royal7 Jun 19441730Port Royal71Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer escort USS Carter (DE-112).

Turcio, Aldo8 Jun 19440640Port Royal8 Jun 19441800Port Royal100Exercises with the patrol vessel USS PC-1597. Also possibly also with the destroyer escort USS Carter (DE-112).

Turcio, Aldo9 Jun 19440605Port Royal9 Jun 19441705Port Royal83Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer escort USS Carter (DE-112).

Turcio, Aldo10 Jun 19440615Port Royal10 Jun 19441753Port Royal97Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer escort USS Carter (DE-112).

Turcio, Aldo11 Jun 19440630Port Royal11 Jun 19441753Port Royal21Exercises with the destroyers USS Charles S. Sperry (DD-697), USS Collett (DD-730) and USS Taussig (DD-746).

Turcio, Aldo12 Jun 19440710Port Royal12 Jun 19441900Port Royal90Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo13 Jun 19440555Port Royal13 Jun 19441709Port Royal80Exercises with the destroyer escorts USS Oberrender (DE-344), USS Lawrence C. Taylor (DE-415) and the destroyer USS Taussig (DD-746), but the latter had to opt out due to a defective sonar.

Turcio, Aldo14 Jun 19440652Port Royal14 Jun 19441740Port Royal71Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo15 Jun 19440647Port Royal15 Jun 19441845Port Royal98Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo16 Jun 19440645Port Royal16 Jun 19441720St. George65Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo18 Jun 19440730St. George18 Jun 19441748Port Royal65Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo19 Jun 19440640Port Royal19 Jun 19441940Port Royal98Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo20 Jun 19440628Port Royal20 Jun 19441850Port Royal95Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo21 Jun 19440810Port Royal21 Jun 19441000St. George17Passage Port Royal-St George.

Turcio, Aldo27 Jun 19440810St. George27 Jun 19441000Port Royal17Passage St George-Port Royal.

Turcio, Aldo1 Jul 19440649Port Royal1 Jul 19441805Port Royal70Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo3 Jul 19440835Port Royal3 Jul 19441045St. George17Passage Port Royal-St George.

Turcio, Aldo8 Jul 19440605Port Royal8 Jul 19440903St. George17Passage St George-Port Royal.

Turcio, Aldo30 Jul 19441232St. George30 Jul 19441340St. George9Trials.

Turcio, Aldo31 Jul 19440605St. George31 Jul 19441715St. George74Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer escort USS Willis (DE-395), USS Janssen (DE-396) and USS Wilhoite (DE-397) from the USS Bogue (CVE-9) group. Possibly other ships from this group were also involved.

Turcio, Aldo1 Aug 19440635Port Royal1 Aug 19441715Port Royal84Exercises with the destroyer USS Haynsworth (DD-700) and the destroyer escort USS Maurice J. Manuel (DE-351).

Turcio, Aldo2 Aug 19440640Port Royal2 Aug 19441720Port Royal72Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo3 Aug 19440530Port Royal3 Aug 19441705Port Royal107Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo6 Aug 19440638Port Royal6 Aug 19441748Port Royal77Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo9 Aug 19440635Port Royal9 Aug 19441535Port Royal66Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo12 Aug 19440635Port Royal12 Aug 19441630Port Royal69Exercises with the destroyers USS Ault (DD-698), USS Haynsworth (DD-700) and the destroyer escort USS Moore (DE-240).

Turcio, Aldo13 Aug 19440625Port Royal13 Aug 19441815Port Royal90Exercises with the destroyers USS Waldron (DD-699) and USS Mannert L. Abele (DD-733).

Turcio, Aldo14 Aug 19440605Port Royal14 Aug 19441640Port Royal81Exercises with the destroyer escorts USS Doyle C. Barnes (DE-353) and USS Silverstein (DE-534).

Turcio, Aldo16 Aug 19440610Port Royal16 Aug 19441740Port Royal84Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo17 Aug 19440625Port Royal17 Aug 19441820Port Royal86Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer escort USS Ulvert M. Moore (DE-442).

Turcio, Aldo18 Aug 19440642Port Royal18 Aug 19441800Port Royal103Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo19 Aug 19440630Port Royal19 Aug 19441717Port Royal82Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer escort USS Ulvert M. Moore (DE-442).

Turcio, Aldo20 Aug 19440632Port Royal20 Aug 19441835Port Royal98Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer escort USS Ulvert M. Moore (DE-442).

Turcio, Aldo23 Aug 19440625Port Royal23 Aug 19441445Port Royal64Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo24 Aug 19440635Port Royal24 Aug 19441750Port Royal85Exercises with the destroyer USS Haynsworth (DD-700).

Turcio, Aldo25 Aug 19440620Port Royal25 Aug 19441700Port Royal80Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo26 Aug 19440810Port Royal26 Aug 19440945St. George17Passage Port Royal-St George.

Turcio, Aldo31 Aug 19440755St. George31 Aug 19441728Port Royal80Passage St George-Port Royal.

Turcio, Aldo1 Sep 19440636Port Royal1 Sep 19441700Port Royal79Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo2 Sep 19440635Port Royal2 Sep 19441630Port Royal77Exercises with the destroyers USS Waldron (DD-699) and USS Mannert L. Abele (DD-733).

Turcio, Aldo3 Sep 19440630Port Royal3 Sep 19441815Port Royal83Exercises with the destroyer USS Van Valkenburgh (DD-656).

Turcio, Aldo4 Sep 19440630Port Royal4 Sep 19441725Port Royal74Exercises with the destroyers USS Waldron (DD-699) and USS Mannert L. Abele (DD-733).

Turcio, Aldo6 Sep 19440620Port Royal6 Sep 19441700Port Royal77Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo7 Sep 19440720Port Royal7 Sep 19441825Port Royal100Exercises with the destroyers USS Purdy (DD-734) and USS Harry E. Hubbard (DD-748).

Turcio, Aldo8 Sep 19440635Port Royal8 Sep 19441727Port Royal86Exercises with the destroyers USS Van Valkenburgh (DD-656) and USS John W. Weeks (DD-701).

Turcio, Aldo9 Sep 19440630Port Royal9 Sep 19441709Port Royal82Exercises with the destroyer USS Harry E. Hubbard (DD-748). A hurricane was anticipated in the next days.

Turcio, Aldo10 Sep 19440640Port Royal10 Sep 19441700Port Royal69Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo11 Sep 19441840Port Royal11 Sep 19441920Port Royal3Changed anchorage. A hurricane was coming from the south.

Turcio, Aldo12 Sep 19441920Port Royal12 Sep 19441940Port Royal3Changed anchorage. CVE exercises were cancelled.

Turcio, Aldo13 Sep 19440628Port Royal13 Sep 19441805Port Royal78Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo14 Sep 19440635Port Royal14 Sep 19441750Port Royal78Exercises with the destroyer escorts USS Lloyd E. Acree (DE-356) and USS Kendall C. Campbell (DE-443).

Turcio, Aldo16 Sep 19440640Port Royal16 Sep 19441750Port Royal100Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo17 Sep 19441250Port Royal17 Sep 19441815Port Royal2Changed anchorage.

Turcio, Aldo19 Sep 19440640Port Royal19 Sep 19441615Port Royal75Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo21 Sep 19440700Port Royal21 Sep 19441725Port Royal73Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo23 Sep 19440647Port Royal23 Sep 19441740Port Royal74Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo25 Sep 19440630Port Royal25 Sep 19441841Port Royal86Exercises with the destroyer escorts USS Woodson (DE-359) and USS Bray (DE-709).

Turcio, Aldo26 Sep 19440700Port Royal26 Sep 19441755Port Royal84Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo4 Oct 19440712Port Royal4 Oct 19441855Port Royal86Exercises. Possibly with the destroyer escort USS Johnnie Hutchins (DE-360).

Turcio, Aldo5 Oct 19440710Port Royal5 Oct 19442020Port Royal104Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo6 Oct 19440745Port Royal6 Oct 19441430Port Royal65Exercises.

Turcio, Aldo13 Oct 19441602Port Royal17 Oct 19440820Portsmouth (N.H.)795Passage Port Royal-Portsmouth (N.H.) for major refit.

Monteleoni, Leone1 Jan 1945date???Bermuda1 Jan 1945date???New London (Conn.)Passage Bermuda-New London (Conn.).

Monteleoni, Leone25 Jan 19451730Portsmouth (NH)27 Jan 19450850New London (CT)180Passage Portsmouth (NH)-New London (CT) escorted by the destroyer escort USS George W. Ingram (DE-62).

Monteleoni, Leone16 Feb 19451320New London (CT)16 Feb 19451945New London (CT)30Trials.

Monteleoni, Leone17 Feb 19451415New London (CT)17 Feb 19451450New London (CT)0,5Changed anchorage.

Monteleoni, Leone24 Feb 19450356New London (CT)24 Feb 19450155New London (CT)195Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone26 Feb 19451027New London (CT)26 Feb 19451130New London (CT)0,5Changed anchorage.

Monteleoni, Leone2 Mar 19450500New London (CT)3 Mar 19451610New London (CT)104Exercises with the destroyer escorts USS Thornhill (DE-195), USS Cates (DE-763), USS Gandy (DE-764) and USS Earl K. Olsen (DE-765). On 3 March, USS Gandy escorted Dandolo, towed by a tug, when her steering failed.

Monteleoni, Leone17 Mar 19450500New London (CT)23 Mar 19451610Guantanamo (Cuba)1508Passage New London (CT)-Guantanamo (Cuba) escorted by minesweeper USS Eager (AM-224).

Monteleoni, Leone1 Apr 19450718Guantanamo1 Apr 19451434Guantanamo44Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone2 Apr 19450713Guantanamo2 Apr 19451502Guantanamo30Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone3 Apr 19450715Guantanamo3 Apr 19451458Guantanamo30Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone4 Apr 19450716Guantanamo4 Apr 19451710Guantanamo53Exercises with the destroyer USS Henry W. Tucker (DD-875).

Monteleoni, Leone6 Apr 19450712Guantanamo6 Apr 19451652Guantanamo43Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone8 Apr 19450648Guantanamo8 Apr 19451510Guantanamo414Exercises with the escort carrier USS Core (CVE-13) and CorDiv 7.

Monteleoni, Leone14 Apr 19450725Guantanamo14 Apr 19451500Guantanamo29Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone18 Apr 19450735Guantanamo18 Apr 19451548Guantanamo31Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone20 Apr 19450715Guantanamo20 Apr 19451221Guantanamo37Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone21 Apr 19450720Guantanamo21 Apr 19451620Guantanamo52Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone29 Apr 19450716Guantanamo29 Apr 19451630Guantanamo38Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone1 May 19450720Guantanamo1 May 19451545Guantanamo43Exercises with high-speed transport USS Myers (APD-105, ex DE-595).

Monteleoni, Leone2 May 19450718Guantanamo2 May 19451614Guantanamo40Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone3 May 19450740Guantanamo3 May 19451445Guantanamo40Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone9 May 19450915Guantanamo9 May 19451805Guantanamo40Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone10 May 19450645Guantanamo10 May 19451450Guantanamo39Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone15 May 19450625Guantanamo15 May 19451550Guantanamo45Exercises with the destroyer USS Vesole (DD-878). and the minesweeper USS Quail (AM-377). Quail reported scoring thirteen hits in twenty-two runs with hedgehogs,

Monteleoni, Leone16 May 19450701Guantanamo16 May 19451015Guantanamo27Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone18 May 19450625Guantanamo18 May 19451528Guantanamo38Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone19 May 19450635Guantanamo19 May 19451400Guantanamo38Exercises with the destroyer USS Beatty (DD-756).

Monteleoni, Leone27 May 19450620Guantanamo27 May 19451020Guantanamo22Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone28 May 19450640Guantanamo28 May 19451455Guantanamo38Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone29 May 19450633Guantanamo29 May 19451440Guantanamo39Exercises with the destroyer USS Gearing (DD-710) and the high speed transport USS Joseph M. Auman ( (APD-117).

Monteleoni, Leone30 May 19450638Guantanamo30 May 19451506Guantanamo40Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone3 Jun 19450650Guantanamo3 Jun 19451506Guantanamo40Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone5 Jun 19450643Guantanamo5 Jun 19451425Guantanamo30Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone6 Jun 19450659Guantanamo6 Jun 19451541Guantanamo40Exercises. Possibly exercised with the destroyer escort USS Ramsden (DE-382).

Monteleoni, Leone11 Jun 19450700Guantanamo11 Jun 19451720Guantanamo60Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone13 Jun 19451035Guantanamo13 Jun 19451745Guantanamo38Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone15 Jun 19450810Guantanamo15 Jun 19451605Guantanamo40Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone18 Jun 19450827Guantanamo18 Jun 19451640Guantanamo34Exercises with the destroyer escort USS Burrows (DE-105).

Monteleoni, Leone3 Jul 19451015Guantanamo3 Jul 19451735Guantanamo37Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone4 Jul 19450655Guantanamo4 Jul 19451443Guantanamo42Exercises with the destroyer escorts USS Herbert C. Jones (DE-137) and USS J.R.Y. Blakely (DE-140) of CorDiv 9.

Monteleoni, Leone5 Jul 19450640Guantanamo5 Jul 19451410Guantanamo30Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone6 Jul 19450640Guantanamo6 Jul 19451125Guantanamo23Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone8 Jul 19450715Guantanamo8 Jul 19451400Guantanamo33Exercises with the destroyer escorts USS Inch (DE-146) and USS Snowden (DE-246).

Monteleoni, Leone10 Jul 19450638Guantanamo10 Jul 19451512Guantanamo36Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone12 Jul 19450710Guantanamo12 Jul 19451355Guantanamo45Exercises with the destroyer escorts USS Stanton (DE-247) and USS Swasey (DE-248).

Monteleoni, Leone13 Jul 19450639Guantanamo13 Jul 19451424Guantanamo38Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone14 Jul 19450625Guantanamo14 Jul 19451008Guantanamo26Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone16 Jul 19450650Guantanamo16 Jul 19451245Guantanamo35Exercises with the destroyers USS Steinaker (DD-863) and USS Bordelon (DD-881).

Monteleoni, Leone17 Jul 19450650Guantanamo17 Jul 19451245Guantanamo27Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone19 Jul 19451238Guantanamo19 Jul 19451744Guantanamo24Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone21 Jul 19450645Guantanamo21 Jul 19451500Guantanamo38Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone22 Jul 19450635Guantanamo22 Jul 19451439Guantanamo37Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone23 Jul 19450638Guantanamo23 Jul 19451410Guantanamo29Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone23 Jul 19450638Guantanamo23 Jul 19451410Guantanamo29Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone26 Jul 19450645Guantanamo26 Jul 19451350Guantanamo29Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone27 Jul 19450635Guantanamo27 Jul 19451405Guantanamo37Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone28 Jul 19450635Guantanamo28 Jul 19451500Guantanamo32Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone29 Jul 19451150Guantanamo29 Jul 19451745Guantanamo24Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone30 Jul 19450935Guantanamo30 Jul 19451650Guantanamo30Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone12 Aug 19450640Guantanamo12 Aug 19451430Guantanamo31Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone14 Aug 19450640Guantanamo14 Aug 19451420Guantanamo32Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone19 Aug 19450640Guantanamo19 Aug 19451445Guantanamo31Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone21 Aug 19450645Guantanamo21 Aug 19451420Guantanamo30Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone23 Aug 19450730Guantanamo23 Aug 19451450Guantanamo31Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone24 Aug 19450630Guantanamo24 Aug 19451345Guantanamo32Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone26 Aug 19450730Guantanamo26 Aug 19451640Guantanamo42Exercises with the destroyer USS Selfridge (DD-357) and the high speed transport USS Cread (APD-88).

Monteleoni, Leone27 Aug 19450800Guantanamo27 Aug 19451500Guantanamo30Exercises.

Monteleoni, Leone24 Sep 19451320Guantanamo30 Sep 19450800Guantanamo994,5Passage Guantanamo-Port Royal with Atropo and Speri, escorted by the patrol vessel USS PC-1192.

Monteleoni, Leone5 Oct 19451240Port Royal16 Oct 19450950Ponto Delgada1955Passage Port Royal-Ponto Delgada with Onice, Atropo, Speri, Vortice, Marea and Da Procida, escorted by the salvage vessel USS Chain (ARS-20). At 1607 hours on 5th September, she ran aground on a shoal in the narrow channel. Towed away by Chain (ARS-20) at 1840 hours on the same day. Bermuda records them leaving on 4th October.

Monteleoni, Leone21 Oct 19451210Ponto Delgada26 Oct 19450725Gibraltar1002Passage Ponto Delgada-Gibraltar.

Monteleoni, Leone28 Oct 19451310Gibraltar3 Nov 19451045Taranto1310,5Passage Gibraltar-Taranto with Da Procida, Onice, Atropo, Speri, Vortice and Marea, escorted by USS Chain (ARS-20). Met off Taranto by Italian torpedo boats Libra (LB), Ariete (AE) and Cassiopea (CS).

355 entries. 298 total patrol entries (24 marked as war patrols) and 82 events.

Events

GH 09.03.2021: This table kept here until we make fix the possible missing events in table above

CommanderDateTimePositionDescription
Riccardo Boris13 Jun 19400725
0940 (e)
37.00 N, 00.17 W
(e) 37.10 N, 00.10 E
(o) 120° - Cape Palos - 46 miles.
At 0644 hours, the hydrophones had detected an enemy formation. At 0713 hours, it was recognised as three cruisers screened by destroyers. Twelve minutes later, two torpedoes were fired from the bow tubes (533mm) at a distance of 1,600 metres aimed at the third cruiser. They missed. These were the French light cruisers La Galissonière, Jean de Vienne, Marseillaise, escorted by destroyers Brestois and Boulonnais. They were alerted by two of their float planes and took avoiding action. One torpedo passed between La Galissonière and Jean De Vienne, missing the latter by 20 meters ahead.
Riccardo Boris13 Jun 19400725+
0625 (e)
37.00 N, 00.17 W
(o) 45 miles SE of Cape Palos.
The French cruiser squadron had sent two float planes to scout ahead, HS 35 from La Galissonière and HS 36 from Jean de Vienne. HS 36 sighted the periscope on the port side of the 3rd D.C.T. and dived on it without attacking it as the aircraft was armed with bombs. As HS 35 also closed, she sighted the launching of the two torpedoes and dropped a bomb. The submarine was going deep after firing her torpedoes and had just reached a depth of 20 meters when she was badly shaken by the bomb. La Galissonnière dropped 12 depth-charges and the French Admiral ordered the destroyers of the 5th D.C.T. (Brestois and Boulonnais) to hunt the submarine. They dropped each three grenades without result, the submarine had gone down to 118 meters. At 0702 hours, the destroyer Typhon, who was also escorting the battleship Provence, sighted a bubble attributed to a torpedo launch and dropped six depth-charges without result. Dandolo reported them at 0809 hours (Rome Time) to her starboard side.
Riccardo Boris3 Jul 19401910-2140(o) Near Cape Palos.An enemy escort vessel dropped depth-charges on the submarine.
Riccardo Boris21 Aug 19402345
2050 (e)
36.57.5 N, 13.37.5 W
(e) 36.56 N, 13.15 W
At 2030 hours, a tanker estimated at 10,000 tons or more, was observed on a 250° course. The submarine trailed her until 2345 hours, when a single torpedo (533mm, W type) was fired and hit the target. This was the Dutch tanker Hermes (3768 GRT, built 1914) proceeding to England. The torpedo caused a large hole on the port side forward. She was abandoned but, as she did show any sign of sinking, the crew returned on board and brought her to Lisbon. There were no casualties.
Riccardo Boris26 Aug 1940200037.13 N, 21.43 W
(e) 37.10 N, 21.50 W
At 1800 hours, a steamer was observed zigzagging and Dandolo maneuvered to take a position ahead of her for attack. She appeared to be an 8,000-ton armed steamer. At 2000 hours, a single torpedo (533mm, W type) was fired and struck the vessel in the aft hold and she sank in ten minutes. The victim was the British Ilvington Court (5.187 GRT, built 1919) carrying a cargo of iron ore from Freetown to Cardiff. Her crew of forty-six managed to reach Santa Maria Island (Azores) on 29th August.
Riccardo Boris20 Oct 1940185553.12 N, 25.34 W
A steamer proceeding alone was sighted at a distance of 8,000 metres. The submarine attempted to close but was thwarted by the heavy seas and gave up the chase.
Riccardo Boris27 Oct 1940175055.36 N, 21.46 W
On receipt of a signal from a U-boat, at 1300 hours, reporting a convoy in 56°15' N, 16°15' W, the submarine took an interception course. Nothing was seen and at 0620 hours on the 28th, the chase was abandoned.
Riccardo Boris31 Oct 1940213055.46 N, 22.04 W
Dandolo received a signal from Malaspina (timed 1630/31) reporting a convoy in 57°15' N, 21°15' W and altered course to intercept. Heavy seas forced the submarine to abandon the chase.
Riccardo Boris1 Nov 1940092755.52 N, 20.54 W
A lone steamer steering 030° was sighted at 5,000 metres. Because of visibility conditions, C.C. Boris elected to intercept, submerged at full speed on electric motors, but could not catch up.
Riccardo Boris31 Jan 19412155
2015-2020 (e)
49.04 N, 19.31 W
At 1918 hours, a 6,500-ton tanker was sighted in 49°23' N, 19°35' W. At 2155 hours, Dandolo had closed to 500 metres to fire two torpedoes (450mm) from the bow tubes. They broke surface and missed. This was the British Pizarro (1,367 GRT, built 1923), a straggler from convoy O.G.51 from Oban to Gibraltar, carrying 1,500 tons of general cargo and 400 tons of mail.
Riccardo Boris31 Jan 19412228
2030 (e)
49.04 N, 19.31 W
(e) 49.03 N, 19.40 W
At 2228 hours, two torpedoes (450mm) were fired from the stern tubes at a distance of 500 metres. This time both hit. Pizarro sank in 5 minutes with twenty-three of her crew. Three explosions had been felt on board Pizarro, but two were muffled and one was "terrific". There were six survivors who were picked up by the steamer MacBrae, another straggler from the same convoy.
Riccardo Boris8 Feb 19411400-172053.37 N, 18.47 W
At 1400 hours, a steamer was observed zigzagging on a northeasterly course. The submarine attempted to trail her, but the chase would force her to exit her zone of operation. At 1952 hours, a submarine was sighted at 3,500 metres. This was Morosini who would attack this ship shortly after. The target was the Dutch steamer Prins Fredrik Hendrik (1288 GRT, built 1936).
Riccardo Boris22 Feb 19410855-0857(o) 283° of Pointe La Coubre - 14 miles (off Gironde).The submarine sighted three torpedo tracks, the nearest passing 40 metres across her bows. The German submarine chaser UJ-E and the minesweepers M-10, M-13 and M-25 were sent to hunt, but located nothing. The "attack" was apparently bogus as no British submarines operated in the area. The "torpedoes" were probably porpoises.
Riccardo Boris16 Apr 19410540-055535.26 N, 07.14 W
A shadow was sighted at 5,000 metres, it was identified as a battleship, escorted by two destroyers, on a 240° course. The submarine could not close the range to carry out an attack, but elected not to make an enemy report as these ships were going to pass outside the patrol areas of Italian submarines. These were most probably the battleship HMS Queen Elizabeth, escorted by three destroyers HMS Velox, HMS Wrestler and HMS Fury (local escort), which had sailed at 2205 hours on the 15th from Gibraltar for Freetown.
Riccardo Boris29 Jun 19410820-1215(o) Off Lisbon.At 0820 hours, the submarine sighted a steamer on a southerly course and took an intercepting course. At 1005 hours, the submarine had initially closed to use her bow tubes, but then elected to turn for a stern shot, when she recognised a vessel with Red Cross markings and broke off the attack. However, shortly after she intercepted an SOS indicating the vessel was the Spanish Earg (?).
Riccardo Boris29 Jun 19412208(o) Off Cape St. Vincent.At a distance of 7,000 metres, the submarine spotted a destroyer coming toward her and dived to avoid being seen. C.C. Boris decided to delay the passage through the Straits if Gibraltar by one day.
Riccardo Boris2 Jul 19410230(o) Off Cape Tariffa (Morocco).A destroyer or torpedo-boat was seen silhouetted against the Moroccan coast at a distance of 1,500 metres but Boris decided to continue his route on the surface and was not detected.
Riccardo Boris24 Sep 1941061038.19 N, 08.41 E
A submarine, similar to Dandolo, was seen but could not be identified.
Walter Auconi29 Sep 1941064537.17 N, 01.07 E
A destroyer was seen at 1,000 metres followed by two cruisers. The submarine attempted to make a bow attack. Auconi then decided to try a stern shot at 600 metres, but was thwarted by the appearance of a second destroyer and went deep.
Walter Auconi30 Sep 1941031837.14 N, 01.01 E
Five destroyers were seen and the submarine took avoiding action.
Walter Auconi30 Sep 1941064837.14 N, 01.01 E
(o) Approximately.
Dandolo sighted a dark vessel coming at her at high speed. The submarine crash-dived but appeared to have been the subject of a systematic A/S search by four vessels. From 0925 to 1330 houra, Dandolo was severely depth-charged,with patterns from six to eight depth-charges.
Walter Auconi3 Oct 1941062538.43 N, 09.35 E
An unknown submarine was observed steering 200°, which was later reported as enemy (apparently none in area). Auconi ordered the gun crew to action station but decided to disengage.
Walter Auconi1 Nov 1941133538.00 N, 07.37 E
A British bomber was sighted at 8,000 metres and the submarine dived.
Walter Auconi4 Nov 19410440-0552
0340 (e)
36.44 N, 02.29 E
At 0345 hours, a large steamer was sighted at distance of 8,000 metres and later identified as a 10,000-ton tanker. Although she was identified as French by her markings and by signals exchanged with Algiers, Auconi believed it might be a British tanker disguised as such and, just after 0440 hours, Dandolo opened fire with both her deck guns scoring hits while the target returned fire.

This was the Vichy tanker Tarn (4,220 GRT, built 1939) on passage from Casablanca to Algiers.

Dandolo now fired a salvo of three torpedoes from her bow tubes and scored one hit. The tanker Tarn was damaged and had two men killed.

At 0552 hours, Dandolo tried to finish off Tarn with a stern shot but missed. The tanker managed to reach Algiers at 1100 hours the same day.
Walter Auconi8 Nov 19410745
0700 (e)
(o) Bay of Melilla.At 0720 hours, a merchant ship was sighted, which was poorly illuminated and did not show any national markings.

At 0745 hours, Dandolo fired a single torpedo from tube no.1 (her last torpedo available in the bow tubes). It appeared to have an erratic run initially, but 80 seconds later a hit was observed under the stern and the vessel sank in three or four minutes.

This was the second error Auconi committed on this patrol, as the target was the Spanish Castillo Oropesa (6,600 GRT, built 1917 [also listed as 5,177 GRT]). In ballast, she had left Barcelona for Melilla and was now awaiting permission to enter harbour to pick up iron ore for Gijon. There were no casualties. This was another embarrassing incident for Italian authorities, who tried to deny that the culprit was an Italian submarine. However, the Spaniards recovered fragments of the torpedo and identified it as of Italian manufacture. Officially, the Italian government refuted the accusations by stating that Italian torpedoes had been sold to Yugoslavia and the Netherlands and arguing this did not constitute a proof of Italian involvement.
Walter Auconi13 Dec 1941093538.10 N, 19.04 E
An unidentified aircraft was seen and the submarine dived.
Walter Auconi13 Dec 1941143035.50 N, 19.46 E
Two unidentified aircraft were seen at 4,000 metres and the submarine dived.
Walter Auconi13 Dec 1941162035.44 N, 19.58 E
A derelict mine was observed but not destroyed.
Walter Auconi15 Dec 1941082034.05 N, 23.30 E
An unidentified aircraft was seen flying low and the submarine dived.
Walter Auconi15 Dec 1941100734.02 N, 23.16 E
An unidentified aircraft was seen at 4,000 metres and the submarine dived.
Walter Auconi15 Dec 1941113533.58 N, 23.42 E
(o) Approximately.
An unidentified aircraft was seen at 5,000 metres, but the submarine remained on the surface as it appeared to be moving away.
Walter Auconi15 Dec 1941114533.58 N, 23.42 E
An unidentified aircraft was seen at 3,000 metres and the submarine dived.
Walter Auconi19 Dec 1941102533.56 N, 24.35 E
An unidentified aircraft was seen at 6,000 metres and the submarine dived.
Walter Auconi27 Dec 19410935
0945 (e)
33.08 N, 24.46 E
(e) 33.08 N, 25.13 E
At 0935 hours, a twin-engine bomber was sighted at 1,500 metres and it made a recognition signal. At first, it was believed to be perhaps a German aircraft. But then as it closed to 200 metres, it was recognised as enemy and the submarine's twin Breda guns which had been manned opened fire but repeatedly jammed so Dandolo escaped by diving ten minutes later. This was a Beaufort of 39 Squadron.
Walter Auconi28 Dec 1941082034.16 N, 22.43 E
(o) Approximately.
An unidentified aircraft was seen, the submarine dived and heard distant explosions.
Walter Auconi31 Dec 1941035039.25 N, 18.04 E
An unknown vessel was sighted, probably an Italian submarine [Cagni, Millo and Mocenigo were expected to arrive in Taranto at about the same time]. This was probably Mocenigo.
Walter Auconi10 Feb 1942230038.31 N, 18.50 E
Unknown submarine was sighted on opposite course, believed to be Mocenigo.
Walter Auconi14 Feb 19421034At 1034 hours, Dandolo was informed that a convoy of 22 ships was sighted at 0800 hours in 34°43' N, 21°45' E steering 310°. The submarine was just proceeding to intercept when, at 1100 hours, a signal was received reporting a second convoy at 0900 hours in 35°03' N, 17°55' E on a 105° course. Dandolo proceeded on a course to sight both convoys, but heard only very distant H.E. believed to be the convoy on the starboard side at 60 miles and the one on the port side at 90 miles.
Walter Auconi14 Feb 19421310At 1310 hours, the submarine was informed that a third convoy with a battleship, three cruisers and a number of destroyers was sighted at 1020 hours in 34°43' N, 18°55' E on a 120° course. This was probably Force B with convoy M.E.10. Auconi believed that this convoy would pass through Dandolo's position and at 1436 H.E. were heard from what was believed to be this convoy. At 1900 hours the submarine surfaced in 33°53' N, 20°26' E.
Walter Auconi14 Feb 1942200033.53 N, 20.26 E
A derelict mine was observed.
Walter Auconi20 Feb 19420415At 0415 hours, the submarine was informed of a naval force located at 0330 hours in 33°03' N, 23°07' E. The submarine submerged for a listening watch, but nothing was detected.
Walter Auconi21 Feb 1942204533.23 N, 23.25 E
A derelict mine was observed.
Walter Auconi24 Feb 1942061834.51 N, 20.40 E
At 0618 hours, the submarine Tricheco was encountered. She was in difficulty after suffering severe weather damage. The previous evening, at 2000 hours, Dandolo had been informed of her predicament and ordered by MARICOSOM to proceed to her assistance. Dandolo and Tricheco proceeded in company at 11 knots to Augusta.
Walter Auconi24 Feb 1942160035.34 N, 19.01 E
A derelict mine was observed.
Gaetano Di Meglio20 Mar 19421400The submarine was informed that a force consisting of two aircraft carriers, a battleship and a cruiser had sailed from Gibraltar [these were the aircraft carriers HMS Eagle and HMS Argus, the battleship HMS Malaya and the light cruiser HMS Hermione escorted by the destroyers HMS Whitehall, HMS Wishart, HMS Laforey, HMS Duncan, HMS Active, HMS Anthony and the escort destroyers HMS Blankney, HMS Croome and HMS Exmoor) for Operation PICKET I]. This was amplified by a signal from the submarine Mocenigo, which was received at 2315 hours. Dandolo proceeded to take an intercepting position, but did not hear or see anything and was informed the next afternoon that the force had apparently reverted course to Gibraltar [they actually returned on 23rd March].
Gaetano Di Meglio22 Mar 1942122637.24 N, 00.04 E
Dandolo detected with her hydrophones a naval force steering 230°, 16 knots. The submarine could not make visual contact but made an enemy report.
Gaetano Di Meglio25 Mar 19421400Dandolo was informed that the British steamer Empire Kestul (sic?) would sail from Valencia to Gibraltar. The submarine took an intercepting position off Cape Palos, but only sighted a Swiss ship believed to be Eiger, arriving from the Balearic Islands, at 0605 hours on the 26th.
Gaetano Di Meglio26 Mar 19421100(o) Off Cape Palos.Dandolo was informed that the British steamer Etrib (1943 GRT, built 1913) would sail from Valencia to Gibraltar. The submarine remained off Cape Palos in the hope of intercepting the ship and only sighted the French ship Providence at 0340 hours on the 27th and another French vessel at 0526 hours.
Gaetano Di Meglio27 Mar 19420705
0603 (e)
37.30.5 N, 00.30.5 W
(e) 37.20.7 N, 00.44.3 W
At 0705 hours, an unknown submarine was seen at 700 metres. Dandolo prepared to make a recognition signal, but the submarine turned away and dived at 0607 hours. This was HMS HMS Upright (Lt. J. S. Wraith, RN) on passage from Malta to Gibraltar, she carried only two torpedoes and prudently avoided action.
Gaetano Di Meglio28 Mar 1942085037.07.5 N, 00.16 E
Dandolo detected a naval force with her hydrophones. It was later believed to be five destroyers conducting an A/S search, three of which passed over the submarine. The submarine took evasive action by diving to 70 meters.
Gaetano Di Meglio29 Mar 1942123537.12 N, 01.04 E
At 1235 hours, Dandolo detected a naval force with her hydrophones. Earlier, she had been informed by a signal from the submarine Brin, that the naval force was returning to Gibraltar and had moved to an intercepting position. The submarine could not immediately make visual contact but, at 1535 hours, she sighted what appeared to be a cruiser at long range.
Gaetano Di Meglio30 Mar 19421400Dandolo was informed of an enemy cruiser off La Galite on a 260° course. She was ordered to move 20 miles to the south (off Cape Tenes). This was executed, but no contact was made.
Alberto Campanella19 Jul 1942134537.27 N, 01.57 E
(o) Approximate position.
At 1120 hours, Dandolo had been informed of an enemy cruiser and altered course to 225°. At 1345 hours, a Sunderland was suddenly sighted and the submarine quickly dived. Several bombs were heard between 1349 and 1410 hours but the submarine was not damaged.
Alberto Campanella21 Jul 19420322
0332B (e)
37.50 N, 02.10 E
(e) 37.48 N, 02.05 E
At 0015 hours, Dandolo had submerged to carry a listening watch. At 0100 hours, several H.E. were heard and the submarine surfaced . At 0258 hours, nothing had been seen and Campanella decided to dive again. Two minutes later, sounds were heard from two groups of vessels, one bearing 185° and the other in 215°. At 0306 hours, Dandolo surfaced again and proceeded toward the first group at 13.5 knots. At 0317 hours, the lookout on the starboard aft station reported a large dark mass bearing 120° at a distance of 4,000 metres. It was identified as an aircraft carrier. This was HMS Eagle with the light cruisers HMS Charybdis and HMS Cairo, escorted by the destroyers HMS Westcott, HMS Wrestler, HMS Ithuriel, HMS Antelope and HMS Vansittart, returning to Gibraltar from operation INSECT.

At 0322 hours, the range had dropped to 2,000 metres when Dandolo fired a full salvo of four torpedoes from her bow tubes aimed at the aircraft carrier. This was a surface attack and the submarine dived upon firing. After two minutes two explosions were heard within three seconds of each other. In fact all torpedoes had missed. On board HMS Eagle, four underwater explosions were heard, one of them close.
Alberto Campanella12 Aug 1942180037.39 N, 09.45 E
At 1800 hours, an enemy naval squadron consisting of two battleships, an aircraft carrier, a cruiser and five destroyers was sighted at a distance of 9-10,000 metres, on a 090° course. Dandolo got as close as 7,000 meters before being attacked at 1830 hours by a destroyer which dropped four depth-charges causing some damage, notably to the periscope. The submarine escaped by going down to 120 meters. Some 120 depth-charges were heard until 2120 hours.
Alberto Campanella13 Aug 19421530As Dandolo was returning to base following the damage incurred the previous day, she was informed at 1530 hours of a damaged aircraft carrier (believed to be HMS Furious). She reverted course in the hope of intercepting it but, at 1645 hours, a new signal came cancelling the previous report and the submarine returned to base.
Giacomo Scano11 Oct 1942085037.43 N, 06.08 E
A German aircraft was seen at 5,000 metres and closed the submarine. They exchanged recognition signals.
Giacomo Scano11 Oct 19421226At 1226 hours, Dandolo was informed that two destroyers had been sighted in 37°45' N, 00°05' E steering 285°. At 1800 hours, she was informed that the two destroyers were now in 37°10' N, 00°45' E steering 090°. Nothing was seen.
Giacomo Scano11 Oct 19421825An unknown submarine on a westerly course was observed at 10,000 metres. Dandolo started to close but then turned away.
Giacomo Scano19 Oct 1942094537.08 N, 03.42 E
At 0945 hours, the submarine Mocenigo was encountered and exchanged recognition signals.
Giacomo Scano8 Nov 1942090537.14 N, 07.40 E
An unidentified aircraft was seen at 5,000 metres.
Giacomo Scano8 Nov 1942152537.16 N, 06.50 E
Dandolo was at periscope depth when, at 1525 hours, a smoke was sighted on the horizon. She closed to 600 metres and identified the vessel as French and assumed it was Gouverneur Général Lépine (3,509 GRT, built 1923), which was due in Philippeville at 1600 hours (according to the French Calendar no.38). Later, the submarine heard only H.E. and developed defects which forced her to abort her mission.
Giacomo Scano25 Nov 19422253(o) Off Bone.At 2253 hours, two submarines were observed apparently exchanging recognition signals. Dandolo turned away.
Giacomo Scano26 Nov 1942013236.59 N, 05.42 E
At 0132 hours, two submarine chasers were sighted and the submarine dived two minutes later.
Giacomo Scano27 Nov 1942060037.23 N, 07.23 E
At 0600 hours, two submarine chasers were sighted and the submarine quickly dived.
Giacomo Scano27 Nov 1942203037.22 N, 06.58 E
At 2030 hours, two dark shadows were observed at a distance of 2,000 metres which appeared to be large corvettes proceeding at 9 knots. Dandolo was surfaced and immediately fired a stern torpedo and turned to port, firing a second torpedo. Her gyrocompass was not operating and the helmsman could only use the magnetic compass. No hits were heard and, four minutes later, the submarine dived.
Giacomo Scano29 Nov 19420525(o) Off Philippeville.At 0525 hours, Dandolo witnessed an air raid on Philippeville. Two minutes later, bombs were observed to fall 2,000 metres away and the submarine prudently dived.
Giacomo Scano2 Dec 1942032936.46 N, 07.58 E
At 0329 hours, a corvette was sighted at 3,000 metres and Dandolo had her torpedo tubes readied but then lost her in a rain squall.
Giacomo Scano4 Dec 19422239
2329 (e)
37.59 N, 08.10 E
(e) 37.55, 08.11 E
At 2239 hours, a submarine chaser was sighted. Dandolo immediately dived and was shaken by the explosions of six depth-charges which caused some damage. Luckily, the enemy warship did not linger on and left the scene. This was actually the destroyer HMS Eskimo on her way to join the light cruiser HMS Aurora (C.S.12).
Giacomo Scano1 Jan 1943050037.14 N, 05.14 E
(o) Italian Grid 6852/4.
At 0430 hours, Dandolo observed two dark shadows and closed. At 0500 hours, they were identified as a 10,000-ton merchant vessel escorted by a destroyer on a 134° course. Other shadows were seen at a distance, leading T.V. Scano to believe that they were part of a larger convoy. Four torpedoes were fired from the bow tubes at 2,500 metres. Two hits were heard, but this has not been confirmed.
Giacomo Scano21 Jan 1943201137.24 N, 06.05 E
At 2011 hours, Dandolo observed firing in the distance and apparently an aircraft being shot down. She attempted to close and submerged to listen with her hydrophones, but nothing was detected until 0340 hours on the 22nd.
Giacomo Scano22 Jan 1943034937.25 N, 06.06 E
At 0340 hours, a shadow was seen. It proved to be a large merchant vessel escorted by two cruisers and destroyers. Nine minutes later, Dandolo fired four torpedoes at a range of 3,000 metres and heard a hit after one minute and 51 seconds and another five seconds later. This has not been confirmed. The submarine was depth-charged and damaged, but escaped by going down to 120 meters. This was probably convoy K.M.S.7 going to Philippeville (seven ships).
Aldo Turcio18 Apr 1943222038.38 N, 06.36 E
At 2220 hours, a German aircraft was sighted. No action was taken. Seven minutes later another two aircraft appeared and Dandolo submerged.
Aldo Turcio26 Apr 19430408
0310 (e)
38.23 N, 06.26 E
(e) 38.15 N, 05.52 E
An unknown submarine was seen at a distance of 1,500-2,000 metres, steering 210°. She fired three torpedoes at Dandolo who turned away as two torpedoes passed on the port side and one on the starboard side. Turcio had intended to fire a stern shot, but the smoke emitted by his diesel engines obscured the visibility. This was the Dutch HrMs Dolfijn (Lt. Cdr. H.M.L.F.E. van Oostrom Soede) and she had fired three torpedoes at long range.
Aldo Turcio5 May 1943130340.57 N, 10.08 E
At 1303 hours, a periscope was sighted. Dandolo attempted to fire a pair of torpedoes but only one left the tube, the second misfired. Range was 1,000 metres and two explosions were heard after four minutes. T.V. Turcio assumed that his torpedo had exploded at the end of her run and that the enemy submarine had done the same.

In fact, no allied submarine operated in the area.
Aldo Turcio15 Jul 1943223037.19 N, 15.55 E
At 2230 hours, the conning tower of a submarine was seen, this was probably Alagi. Dandolo turned away.
Aldo Turcio16 Jul 1943011637.04 N, 16.02 E
At 0116 hours, a dark object, believed to be a submarine, was observed. This was probably Alagi. Dandolo submerged.
Aldo Turcio16 Jul 1943030737.04 N, 16.02 E
(o) Italian Grid 2866/5
At 0257 hours, a naval squadron was sighted at 5,000 metres. They were believed to be two battleships of the KING GEORGE V class escorted by four destroyers. Ten minutes, later, Dandolo fired a salvo of four torpedoes from her bow tubes at a range of 2,000 metres. Two loud hits were heard. This has not been confirmed. T.V. Turcio had also intended to turn and fire his stern torpedoes, but one of the torpedoes exploded after a run of 500 metres and fearing of being discovered, he took his submarine deep.
Aldo Turcio17 Jul 1943003537.15 N, 16.14 E
An unidentified aircraft was seen and the submarine dived.
Aldo Turcio17 Jul 1943030237.02 N, 16.14 E
An unidentified aircraft was seen and the submarine dived.
Aldo Turcio17 Jul 19432230
1957 or 2203B (e)
37.22 N, 16.52 E
(e) 37.17 N, 16.53 E
At 2225 hours, Dandolo was suddenly attacked by an aircraft which appeared from the dark part of the horizon. It dropped four bombs and two depth charges. Two bombs hit the base of the conning tower and two bombs missed the stern, while the two depth-charges, estimated at 200 kg, lodged in the cavity of the counter turret. Luckily, those that hit failed to explode or Dandolo would have been destroyed, but the two depth charges prevented the submarine from diving for fear they would detonate. The aircraft was Wellington 'K' (MP617) of 221 Squadron piloted by Flying Officer W. Lewis. It had sighted a large Italian submarine, estimated at 1,000 tons armed with two guns, one fore and one aft. Lewis decided to attack up moon and approached from the port beam releasing five depth charges from a height of only 50 feet, the last depth charge observed to be exploding under the hull abaft while the rear gunner fired off 100 rounds of his machine gun. After the attack, the bomber remained in the area, observing the submarine still on the surface, circling tightly, smoke and fumes pouring from the conning tower. Lewis attempted to contact surface vessels in the area to home them in, but failed to get an answer. At 0020 hours, the aircraft left the scene. Dandolo abandoned her patrol and, at 2322 hours, informed MARICOSOM of her predicament and that she would be off Cape Colonne at 0600 hours.
9 Jan 19441102
1124 (e)
(o) German Grid CH 9525.Goffredo Mameli observed an explosion 250-300 metres to starboard side and, shortly after, another about 250 metres to port. The escorting destroyer Grecale signalled that they were under air attack, but these were actually premature explosions from torpedoes fired by U-616 (OL Siegfried Koitschka). The Italians vessels were unaware that they had been under attack from a U-boat and, for security reasons, were diverted to Algiers.

All Italian submarines